Learning Plus

Report
Assessment and
Evaluation
in Regina Public Schools
Agenda
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Assessment for learning
SMART Goals
Regina Public School’s Benchmark program
Report Cards
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assessment.rbe.sk.ca
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Traditional Instruction-Assessment model:
Pretest - teach - teach - teach - posttest - assign grades
Instruction-Assessment Model with Data Analysis:
Pre-assess - analyze results - plan for differentiated instruction
- teach - monitor, reflect, and adjust - teach - post-assess
Assessment for learning - using assessment results to improve
student achievement
The Assessment Cycle
Analyzing the Data
Monitoring and Assessing Results
Creating Action Plans
Setting Goals
What is Assessment for learning?
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Classroom assessments are used to inform
students about their growth in achievement and
permits them to feel in control of that growth
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It is about using the results effectively to promote
maximum student learning
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an example of assessment for learning is the writing benchmarks program
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Where am I now? Where am I to go? How will I know when I
get there?
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Assessment is not something that is done to
students and apart from instruction; assessment
must be and must be seen to be something that
is done with students as an integral part of the
learning process. O’conner (2002)
Our Goal: Students who are
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Informed
Analytical
Actively involved in learning
Personally invested – they “buy in” to what we
are doing
Know where they are, where they
want to go and how to get there!
Tips for High Quality
Assessment for learning
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Have clear expectations – What is it we are to learn
and why?
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Student friendly - students understand what they are to do
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Clear purpose – students know why we are doing this
Motivational – students enjoy it, they “buy in”
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Give Accurate feedback –
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we give descriptive and
helpful feedback
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Use a variety of types of assessment
techniques (rubrics, portfolios, exit slips, peer evaluation, learning logs, selfevaluation, checklists, anecdotal records, etc.)
My experiences with assessment and
feedback…
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Think about the BEST feedback you have received in
your lifetime – in or out of the classroom at any age
level! What are the characteristics or circumstances
that made that feedback great for you?
Now think of your worst experience with feedback –
What were the characteristics or circumstances that
made it so awful?
Write your ideas on a sheet of paper and be ready to
share and discuss.
Feedback
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As the number one user of assessment data is
the student, feedback must be frequent,
descriptive, supportive and linked to future
opportunities to demonstrate mastery.
Strategies for Meaningful Feedback
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Offer descriptive feedback instead of grades, on
in-class work as well as homework.
Make clear what work will be included in the final
grade from the outset.
Teach students to self-assess, keep track of learning
and set goals
Teach students focused revision. Have them practice
on other people’s work and their own
Engage students in self-reflection and sharing what
they know.
Dr. Richard Stiggins says:
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Gather dependable evidence
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Encourage students to try and learn
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Have clear learning targets
Give accurate descriptive feedback
Students need to take responsibility for their
own learning
Students must master basic standards
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Dr. Richard Stiggins, 2006
Assessment for Learning
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Show students what good work looks like
Compare their work to that standard
Work towards closing the learning gaps
We must work to instill confidence in students.
Our job is to help students believe
they’re capable learners
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We must help students discover gifts that they
didn’t believe they had
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We can make success irresistible to our
students
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Wayne Hulley, 2006
Students need and deserve the
confidence that their work and
loyalty will payoff with positive
results….
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Assessment for learning is entirely about
delivering that confidence.
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Stiggins, 2006
Physician’s Creed
First, do no harm
Educator’s Creed
Above all, do nothing to
diminish hope!
Wayne Hulley, 2006
S.M.A.R.T. Goals are:
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Specific -
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Measurable -
distilled down to one thing, an outcome to attain
How will we know when we achieved the desired results? Goal
can be measured qualitaatively and quantitatively
Attainable  Results Oriented 
doable, given our capacity (time, resources)
aimed at specific outcomes that are tangible and
observable. Describes outcomes not processes
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Time-bound -
a time frame to achieve the goal, How will we know we are finished?
An Example of a SMART Goal
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Within the next two years, 70% of
all students will score at the
adequate level (level 4) and above
on system and school writing
benchmarks.
SMART Goals
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Each school is required to have an academic goal and an
aboriginal goal.
The academic goal must be related to either literacy or
numeracy
Individual teacher goal supports school goals which in turn
supports the system goals/priorities and the Continuous
Improvement Plan
Benchmark program
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The goal of the benchmark program is to promote higher literacy
and achievement
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Oral Running Records - Grade 1, 2
Writing Benchmarks - Grade 4, 8, 10
Math Problem Solving - Grade 3, 6, 9, A30
Science - Grade 7, 10
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Other assessments this year:
 CAT 3 test - Grade 5, 9, 12
 Sask. Learning AFL Writing - Grade 5, 8, 11
Report Cards
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Go out at the end of November, March and June
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Elementary teachers are to write 3 to 4 sentences
about each student’s progress in Language Arts, Math
and Personal and Social Skills
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Task: Open up the report card folder and fill out one
report card for an imaginary student. High School
teachers open up Gradekeeper.
Assessment.rbe.sk.ca
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Visit this website to get:
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Up to date info on our assessments and
benchmarks
Download rubrics
Post a question on our message board
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The End

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