Slide 1

Report
Washington State
Department of Ecology
March 2011 SOSC Report
2010 Spill review
Washington 2010 Spills
Reported Spills: 3,742
Spills with Response: 3,694
Field Response: 932 (25%)
Percentage of Spills by Product Type
Spills by Product Type
Breakdown by Oil Type
Unknown 3.9%
Crude Oil 0.2%
Sewage/manure
3.2%
LNG 0.4%
Other 7%
Air pollutant 0.8%
Unknown
12.3%
Drug Lab 2.7%
Gasoline/Av gas
12.1%
Vegetable Oil
1.1%
Other Oil 9.0%
Waste Oil
1.7%
Chemical/Hazmat
9.2%
Oil = 66%
Waste Water 6%
Natural
Phenomenon 1%
Bunker Oil
0.6%
Transformer Oil
0.4%
Fuel Oil
1.1%
Lube/Motor Oil
9.7%
Pesticide 0.2%
Pesticide
Natural
Phenomenon
Waste Water
Chemical/Hazmat
Drug Lab
Air Pollutant
Other
Diesel 27.5%
Mineral Oil
8.9%
Includes pesticides, herbicides, insecticides and fungicides
Includes algae and natural decomposition
Includes bilge waste, wastewater, mud and silt
Includes poison gases, flammable materials, chlorofluorocarbons, fertilizers, antifreeze, batteries, lead, mercury and other
heavy metals
Includes methamphetamine labs and waste dump sites
Includes chemical air releases, odor complaints, smoke, exhaust and dust
Includes medical wastes, waxes, lard, garbage and debris
Hydraulic 13.2%
Jet Fuel 1.9%
Data source: Ecology Environmental
Reports Tracking System (ERTS).
Percentage reflects 2010 data for spills
with impacts to surfaces including water,
soil, impermeable, air etc.
Number of Reported Incidents by Source Type (2010)
Abandoned Drums/Cylinders,
66
Fire/Burning, 83
Agriculture, 36
Natural Phenomenon, 36
Above/below Ground
Storage Tanks, 93
Drug Lab, 105
Transportation (truck, car, rail,
air), 812
Wastewater/Sewage, 107
Oil Handling (refinery, pipeline,
retail), 183
Private Property, 227
Commercial/Industrial, 612
Public agency/municipality, 233
Unknown/Other, 539
Vessels, 610
Data source: Ecology Environmental
Reports Tracking System (ERTS). 2010
data for spills with impacts to surfaces
including water, soil, impermeable, air
etc.
Recent Lessons Learned
• Field response rate down 10% (35 – 25%)
• Partially due to FTE reduction
• Responses more complex
• Incident Management Team depth

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