Exploring Claim 2, 3, and 4 Part 2

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Exploring Claim 2, 3, and 4
This material was developed for the Leadership for the Common Core in Mathematics project through the University of WisconsinMilwaukee, Center for Mathematics and Science Education Research (CMSER). This material may be used by schools to support learning
of teachers and staff provided appropriate attribution and acknowledgement of its source. You may not use this work for commercial
purposes.
This project was supported through a grant from the Wisconsin ESEA Title II Improving Teacher Quality Program
Leadership for the Common Core in Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 2013-2014
Today’s Learning Targets
By the end of the session, participants will:
• Understand the assessment targets in Claim 2,
3, and 4.
• Understand the Depth of Knowledge (DOK)
Levels and the Standards for Mathematical
Practice in Claims 2, 3, and 4.
Leadership for the Common Core in Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 2013-2014
Smarter Balanced Claims
1. Concepts and
Procedures
Students can explain and apply mathematical concepts
and interpret and carry out mathematical procedures
with precision and fluency.
2. Problem Solving
Students can solve a range of complex well-posed
problems in pure and applied mathematics, making
productive use of knowledge and problem solving
strategies.
3. Communicating
Reasoning
Students can clearly and precisely construct viable
arguments to support their own reasoning and to
critique the reasoning of others.
4. Data Analysis and
Modeling
Students can analyze complex, real-world scenarios and
can use mathematical models to interpret and solve
problems.
SBAC 2011, p.17
Leadership for the Common Core in Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 2013-2014
Assessment Target Sort
Label three post-its, one for each Claim (2,3,4)
Select one Assessment Target from the envelope.
Discuss the Target.
Place that Assessment Target under the appropriate
Claim.
Repeat!
Leadership for the Common Core in Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 2013-2014
SBAC Claim 2
Problem Solving: Students can solve a range of complex,
well-posed problems in pure and applied mathematics,
making productive use of knowledge and problem-solving
strategies.
Grades 3-8 Targets
• A: Apply mathematics to solve well-posed problems
arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace.
• B: Select and use appropriate tools strategically.
• C: Interpret results in the context of a situation.
• D: Identify important quantities in a practical situation
and map their relationships (e.g., using diagrams, twoway tables, graphs, flowcharts, or formulas).
Leadership for the Common Core in Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 2013-2014
About Claim 2
Rationale for Claim 2 makes it clear that
evidence for it needs to include demonstration
of actual application of problem solving.
These tasks could present non-routine problems
where a substantial part of the challenge is in
deciding what to do and which mathematical
tools to use.
Leadership for the Common Core in Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 2013-2014
SBAC Claim 3
Communicating Reasoning: Students can clearly and precisely construct
viable arguments to support their own reasoning and to critique the
reasoning of others.
• A: Test propositions or conjectures with specific examples.
• B: Construct, autonomously, chains of reasoning that will
justify or refute propositions or conjectures.
• C: State logical assumptions being used.
• D: Use the technique of breaking an argument into cases.
• E: Distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is
flawed and—if there is a flaw in the argument—explain what it
is.
• F: Base arguments on concrete referents such as objects,
drawings, diagrams, and actions.
• G: At later grades, determine conditions under which an
argument does and does not apply. (For example, area increases
with perimeter for squares, but not for all plane figures.)
Leadership for the Common Core in Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 2013-2014
About Claim 3
The set of Claim 3 tasks may involve more than
one domain.
As evidence, students are expected to produce
evidence of their own reasoning and the
reasoning of others.
Claim 3 tasks may involve assessment targets
from an earlier grade.
Leadership for the Common Core in Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 2013-2014
SBAC Claim 4
Modeling and Data Analysis: Students can analyze complex, realworld scenarios and can construct and use mathematical models
to interpret and solve problems
• A: Apply mathematics to solve problems arising in everyday life, society,
and the workplace.
• B: Construct, autonomously, chains of reasoning to justify mathematical
models used, interpretations made, and solutions proposed for a complex
problem.
• C: State logical assumptions being used.
• D: Interpret results in the context of a situation.
• E: Analyze the adequacy of and make improvements to an existing model
or develop a mathematical model of a real phenomenon.
• F:
Identify important quantities in a practical situation and map their
relationships (e.g., using diagrams, two-way tables, graphs, flowcharts, or
formulas).
• G: Identify, analyze, and synthesize relevant external resources to pose or
solve problems.
Leadership for the Common Core in Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 2013-2014
Abut Claim 4
In Claim 4, a key feature of items and tasks is
that the student is confronted with a
contextualized, or real world situation and must
decide which information is relevant and how to
represent it.
Items in Claim 4 are not yet fully formulated
(well-posed) in mathematical terms.
Leadership for the Common Core in Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 2013-2014
Reflection:
What? So What? Now What?
• Understand the assessment targets in Claim 2, 3, and 4.
• Understand the Depth of Knowledge (DOK) Levels and the Standards for
Mathematical Practice in Claims 2, 3, and 4.
What have you learned? What actions will you take
based on what you have learned about all 4 Claims?
Leadership for the Common Core in Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 2013-2014

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