Wanganui Girls* College

Report
NCEA Achievement 2013
Putting it in context
 We strongly believe that using data to inform decisions is
the key to enhancing success
 We tested our students on arrival at Year 9 using NZCER
STAR
 We informed teachers of the stanine and made class and
subject choices based on these results
 We started triangulating our data to predict Year 11
outcomes (STAR stanine and anecdotal knowledge about
students) and predicted that students on stanine 5 and
above should achieve NCEA level 1
 We could then predict by whole cohort and Maori
students the Year 11 outcomes
 These results and predictions were based on cohort not
personalised to students
 We were challenged during an ERO visit about why we
weren’t aiming for 100%!
 And why weren’t we - we asked ourselves?
 ERO’s advice was that the entry data should guide us with
the number, type and range of interventions needed to
get 100% pass rate for all students
 We were challenged to move beyond our self-fulfilling
expectations – a light bulb moment!
Wanganui Girls’ College 2012 Annual Plan
A Successful School Leaver will have achieved at least NCEA Level 2
A safe, respectful, inclusive and positive learning environment
 The challenge was set!
 So…In 2012 one of our Board of Trustees strategic statements was that “A successful
school leaver will have achieved at least NCEA level 2”
Context / Activity
Extensive school data
compiled, reviewed and
used for 2012 planning
-of suitable options for
students
-allocation of teachers to
classes
-options offered and time
allocated in Junior school
What we know now
Students working at STAR
stanine 5 should achieve
NCEA level 1
Students working at
curriculum level 4 at Year 9
should be able to achieve
NCEA Level 2 (MOE
statement)
2011 Year 9 STAR completed
and results available for SMT
and teachers indicate cohort
is strong in literacy (70%
stanine 5 and above, Maori
72%)
2011/ 2012 Actions
Responsibility
Timeline
Ascertain:
What our current Year 9
and 10 academic profile
is using
-STAR at beginning and
end of Year 9
-PAT maths at start of
Year 9 and Year 10
compiled in school
system
-End of Year 9 and 10
grades compiled in
school system
Academic Dean with
EO re data collation
Academic Dean with
EO re data collation
By term 1
2012
Outcomes
Review of 2012 Year 10 data
show s our current students
are strong in literacy.
The Maths data indicates that
student enter WGC with
stanines below the national
averages.
Following discussions with
HODs and staff Maths will
have four periods per week at
both Year 9 and 10 in 2012.
This will be reviewed in 2012
to see if this has made any
difference.
 In 2011 we had introduced our Academic Mentoring
programme for senior students matching students to
teachers that year; students met with two or three times
a year with their allocated Academic Mentor around goal
setting identifying barriers, checking progress and
support and guidance
 In 2012 we were expanding this and we were also
developing and embedding our SWPB4L work and RJ / RP
work – a huge culture shift for staff
 We focussed on Year 11 as that was our most pressing




need (ERO speak!) and …
individual plans were developed to ensure all student
work begun was completed
the range of standards available for assessment were
used to meet the student needs
parents contacted by AMs to advise students were at risk
of not passing
study leave only after targets were met….
 In term 3 2012 we set up large excel spreadsheet for
each year level and each student was named, the
number of students needing help identified and some
strategies put in place to meet their needs
– the three Ns!
In term 4, just before study leave commenced, a letter was
sent home for every senior student detailing:
 How many credits the student had
 How many credits were still available through external
standards
 Literacy and numeracy and UE progress
 Remaining opportunities for completing outstanding
assessments
For any student deemed ‘at risk’, the letter was followed up
with a telephone call.
 In 2012 the outcome for Level One was 89% pass
rate – the highest in the town!
2013
An even more focussed approach:
 We provide more regular progress updates for SMT, Deans,
HODs and AMs
 We have worked with HOD Learning Centre to develop
alternative pathways where relevant
 We have regular, meaningful contact with parents
 We provide ongoing training for AMs on how to check
progress for specific groups
 We have started to triangulate data in a more effective
way – it is now on a much more personal level rather than
cohort
 Increased accountability for staff as whanau, Form
Teachers, students and AMs are regularly using the
system to track progress
Academic Mentoring Days
 Timetable suspended for whole school and 15 – 20
minute meetings arranged with students, whanau and
AMs
 AMs received extensive training in weeks prior to meeting
including how to use data to set targets; role playing
difficult conversations; how to access information on
NZQA website
 We arranged training, provided by Massey University, on
having professional conversations with colleagues
 AMs negotiated agreed targets based on data provided
 We arranged future checkpoints to monitor targets
 Whanau, students and staff completed online and
physical surveys about the effectiveness of the day
Impressions of ART 13-17
 Initially we didn’t quite grasp the purpose of this project
and we were worried that there were hints of ‘Big
Brother’…
 However, Vivianne went to session in Palmerston North,
and I went to presentation by Rawiri at Wanganui City
College and it all fell into place for us.
 We are very in favour of the idea of pathways; what
works for us is really knowing our students, what their
intentions are and ensuring the courses they are
following fits into the pathway. The joy of a smaller
school!
The spreadsheet
 We do have some concerns about the spreadsheet as we
seemed to be spending a lot of time presenting the data
in a different way just for the sake of ‘the spreadsheet’ –
so we now send Mary and Andrea our own version of the
data.
 The spreadsheet does not have the facility to take into
account outside providers.
 We found it difficult to calculate how many credits a
student should be achieving in a particular week as
courses are evolving and changing specifically because of
the nature of this project.
Gained Across All
Years
Lit L1
10
5
115
24
91
y
34
0
0
133
4
129
0
10
0
122
26
96
40 y
36 y
33 y
63
6
80
0
0
149
0
Kendahl
Maori
12 128580407
39
59
11
59
0
6
135
14
121
Jess
NZ
European/Pakeha
12 125325367
57
45
11
61
0
0
117
4
113
Skylah
Fijian
12 131562605
25
93
4
52
6
0
155
30
125
Siobhan
Maori
12
126181103
22
77
4
60
0
0
141
23
118
Tara
Maori
12 129177275
46
47
15
47
10
6
125
16
109
Holly
NZ
European/Pakeha
12 129555679
24
75
10
39
3
0
127
26
101
Lily-Jo
Maori
12 129172018
47
69
15
45
0
0
129
10
119
Sarah
Maori
12
128191112
48
60
10
54
0
0
124
12
Ella
NZ
European/Pakeha
12 126175107
45
71
9
38
6
0
124
Ashleigh
NZ
European/Pakeha
12 128547672
40
88
3
41
3
6
Tyme
Maori
12 126181833
6
88
22
29
8
Brooke
NZ
European/Pakeha
12 126173691
37
67
8
25
Elise
Maori
12 129554843
44
89
10
Eoana
Maori
13 126517501
31
83
29
First Names
Num L1
36
Credits in 2013
12 129196244
This Year
Maori
Ethnicity
Kahurangi
Gained Across All
Years
Gained Across
All Years
L2 +
115
Credits in 2013
37
Poss Ext
152
Credits in 2013
y
5
46 y
42 y
Poss Total
99
Credits in 2013
42
E Int
141
Credits in 2013
y
M Int
46 y
Credits in 2013
108
A Int
16
Credits in 2013
y
112
56 y
54 y
50 y
N Int
y
Credits in 2013
64 y
64 y
60 y
58 y
NYA Int & Ext
y
Credits in 2013
89 y
74 y
W Int & Ext
149
NSN
Poss Int
Ministry level 2 focus group 17th October 2013
y
y
y
y
y
y
y
y
y
Identifying students
Quantitative data
 Academic data from CM
 Attendance
 Pastoral (SWPB4L)
Qualitative data
 Feedback from teachers and AMs
 Self-referral
Sharing data with staff
 We have regular, calendared staff meetings to discuss and
review academic progress of specific year groups
 Provide ongoing training in using MUSAC to acquire data
 We have a notice board in staffroom which is updated
weekly
Needs of students
The needs depended entirely on individual stories
 Pathways (inappropriate choice of subject – HOD LC)
 Attendance (AM, Dean and Form teacher)
 Pastoral (Dean)
 Academic (AM)
Strategies
 All students in the focus group have additional AMs who
report to the Academic Dean weekly on progress (or lack of
it….)
 Regular contact with home
 Ongoing liaison between AMs and subject teachers
 Holiday Pathways course incorporating study skills and
career planning
 Dedicated section of NCEA notice board for the focus
group – all teachers know who is in the group and the AMs
involved
Current position
This time last year 32% of our students had already gained
Level 2 NCEA
We are currently sitting on 45%
Insights
 Rigorous monitoring works
 Personalising works
 Knowing students works
 Sharing information produces increased sense of
ownership among all staff
Challenges
 Maintaining integrity of assessment conditions
 Teacher concern about losing academic integrity due to
‘credit harvesting’
 MUSAC
 Establishing and maintaining meaningful communication
with our Maori families
Where to now?
 For 2014 AMs have already been given the opportunity to
choose if they wish to stay with their current year level or
move to the next year level with their group
 Our ASTRA programme will contain a more focussed unit
on choosing pathways
 At the end of this year we will review and reflect on our
current programme and adapt and improve our plan
where necessary

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