The NZ Film Audience 2013

Report
Geoff Lealand, Screen and Media Studies,
University of Waikato, New Zealand
[email protected]
Gross New Zealand box office in 2012 :
$NZ173.1m (2010=$176.5m)
Cinema admissions in 2011 : 14 million
(2003 = 18+m)
Average movie attendance: 3.2 visits per
year (2011)
470 screens in 2012. Twelve NZ-produced
features earned 2.2% of domestic box
office
THE AUSTRALIAN BOX OFFICE
Gross Australian box office, 2012 =
$A1,125m
Total cinema admissions, 2012 = 85.9m
(43 Australian-produced films in 2012
earned 4.3% of domestic box office)
Cinema typically attracts a young, upscale
audience with higher than average disposable
income.
Whilst the likelihood of going to the movies is
higher amongst the younger age groups, the
highest growth segment in recent years has
been the older ages.
www.valmorgan.co.nz/audiences Aug 2012
These ‘younger age groups’ are also:
• The least-inclined to go to local (New Zealand) films;
• The most –inclined to spread good and bad word-ofmouth, through social media
• The most-inclined to view films beyond the cinema
(DVD, legal or illegal downloads)
The younger audience is adept at digital
media. They are more likely to pirate
films or watch VOD movies at home and
are keenly influenced by social media. If
a film is bagged on Facebook or Twitter,
it can die a quick death on the big
screen. Michael Eldred, Madman Entertainment (2012)
ARTHOUSE MOVIE AUDIENCES
Typical arthouse movie viewers are more likely than the
general population to be highly educated, affluent,
professional, as well as being light commercial TV viewers.
With the strong success of discerning titles on the
mainstream cinema circuit, the lines are increasingly
blurring between mainstream and Arthouse cinema. The
recent box-office success of movies such as Black Swan,
The King’s Speech and True Grit among others is
evidence of how the repetoire of New Zealand moviegoers
has broadened.
www.valmorgan.co.nz/audiences Aug 2012
Older people are flocking to cinemas. But
they don’t care for special effects. They
want big characters, grown-up dramas
and tales of late-blooming love. And so
Hollywood’s changing its game.
‘How older viewers are rescuing cinema’, The Guardian 8 March
2012
Studios now targeting older
auds…there are signs that the
studios’ ageism is giving way to a
recognition that the market place is
changing.
Dave McNary, Variety, Nov 24 2010
If there’s an encouraging lesson to be
drawn from the recent performance of
independent films in the international
market, it’s that intelligent movies by
strong directors are being embraced by
audiences, while derivative, generic and
poorly executed projects are being
snubbed. Variety, May 14 2013
Figures released by the MPDA show
arthouse cinema is experiencing a
dramatic increase in popularity. Of the
306 films released in New Zealand last
year [2011], 189 were independently
produced for the arthouse market. Just
117 were mainstream releases from
major studios.
www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/culture/6365875/Kiwi-cinema-industry-failing-amidpiracy
THE ARTHOUSE SECTOR IN NEW ZEALAND
is thriving!
THE CINEMAS OF NEW ZEALAND SITE
http://cinemasofnz.info
Currently lists 80 reviews of arthouse/independent cinemas around New Zealand;
anticipating at least 100 by the time all are included.
Includes: boutique cinemas, community-run cinemas; independent multi-screens,
with arthouse screenings; New Zealand-owned ‘mini-chains (Gold Cinemas, Lido
Hamilton and Auckland + Capitol); private cinemas; film clubs/societies.
New (2011-2012) cinemas include: Globe (Napier), Rubys (Wanaka), Cinema
Paradiso (relocated, Wanaka), Cinema 3 (Pukekohe), Monterey (Howick)
Closures include: Metro + Academy (Christchurch), Crooked Mile Talking Pictures
(Hokitika)
THE ARTHOUSE/INDEPENDENT AUDIENCE.1
• 50+ skew/retired/senior citizens + Film Festival crowd
(more diverse); female dominated
• Educated and affluent
• Tending to middle-brow rather than high-brow tastes
(anything with Helen Mirren in it…)
• But also National Theatre on Screen and Opera at the
Met
THE ARTHOUSE/INDEPENDENT AUDIENCE.2
• Have considerable leisure time
• Dislike the multiplex environment
• Regard film-going as a social ritual (eg dining,
‘themed’ events’)
• Multiplexes are now chasing this audience (‘boutique’
screens, ‘Retro Showcase’)
• Estimated now to contribute 30% of the NZ box-office
(Mark Christensen, State Theatre, Nelson, December 2011)
TOP 10 FILMS OF 2012 IN NEW ZEALAND
#6 The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel
(20th Century Fox), $NZ5.375m
Michael Eldred says his target market is
unashameably [sic] the “empty nesters –
baby boomers”, with what one
independent film distributor labels “movies
for your mum” … Boutique operators are
investing heavily in their cinemas to create
an “ambience” to attract their niche
audience ..These people [are] more willing
to take a risk with seeing a film from some
exotic part of the world.
www.stuff/co/nz/dominion-post/culture/6365875/Kiwi-cinema-industry-failing-amid-piracy
OPPORTUNITIES
• DC P has reduced overheads (projectionists, freight)
but cinemas are still beholden to distributors;
• Arthouse cinemas have revived film-going as a
‘special’ ritual eg Roxy (Miramar)
• Arthouse cinemas are part of the tourist experience
(eg Wanaka, Arrowtown)
• New cinemas potentially offer more outlets for local
film
ALSO FILM SCHOLARSHIP?
PROBLEMS AND CONSTRAINTS
• The power structures (and personalities) involved in
film distribution (no locally-owned distributors)
• Prospect of expensive digital upgrades ($100,000$160,000) for small cinemas
• Getting the young audience back to the cinema
(downloading)?
• Is the art house audience the last generation of filmgoers?

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