Presentation Helping Career Development Practitioners Through

Report
Helping Career Development Practitioners
Through Training, Certification, and Credentialing
Presented by:
Deirdre Pickerell, Roberta Neault,
Sareena Hopkins, Dale Furbish, and Kay Brawley
Agenda
Setting the
Scene
Exploring
Competency
Frameworks
Getting
Started
Sharing Case
Examples
SETTING
THE SCENE
Opening Thoughts
What is happening in
your region/jurisdiction?
• Is training/certification/credentialing a big deal or off the radar?
• Why?
What is your personal experience
with certification/credentialing?
• Have you pursued it?
• Why or why not?
Some Thoughts on CDP Training
Inconsistent terminology
A “Competent” Practitioner . . .
Knowledge
Skills
Attitudes
EXPLORING COMPETENCY
FRAMEWORKS
Global Career Development Facilitator
(GCDF)
• Developed in US (1997)
• 12 core competencies
• 15 country-specific credentials
Bulgaria
Canada
China
Cyprus
Germany
Greece
Hong Kong
Hungary
Japan
South Korea
Macedonia
New Zealand
Romania
Taiwan
United States
Source: http://www.cce-global.org/GCDF
GCDF Competencies
Helping Skills
Labor Market Information and Resources
Assessment
Diverse Populations
Ethical and Legal Issues
Career Development Models
Employability Skills
Training Clients and Peers
Program Management/Implementation
Promotion and Public Relations
Technology
Consultation
Source: http://www.cce-global.org/GCDF
Educational & Vocational Guidance
Practitioner (EVGP)
•
•
•
•
Adopted by IAEVG (2003)
11 core competencies
10 specialized competencies
3 pre-approved training providers
• Life Strategies Ltd.
• Canadian Career Development Foundation
• Alberta Works
Source: www.iaevg.org/iaevg/nav.cfm?lang=2&menu=1&submenu=6
EVGP Core Competencies
Demonstrate ethical behavior / professional conduct
Demonstrate advocacy / leadership
Demonstrate awareness / appreciation of clients’ culture
Integrate theory / research into practice
Skills to design, implement and evaluate programs / interventions
Demonstrate awareness of personal capacity / limitations
Ability to communicate effectively
Knowledge of updated information on trends / issues
Social and cross-cultural sensitiveness
Skills to cooperate effectively
Demonstrate knowledge of lifelong career development process
Adapted from: http://www.iaevg.org/iaevg/nav.cfm?lang=2&menu=1&submenu=6
Career Professional
Competencies (CDANZ)
Professional Knowledge
Helping Skills
Relationship Management
Professional Practice and Development
Source: www.cdanz.org.nz/career-professionals/career-competencies/
Careers Industry Council of Australia (CICA)
Core Competencies
Career Development Theory
Labour Market
Advanced Communication Skills
Ethical Practice
Diversity
Information and Resource Management
Professional Practice
Source: http://www.cica.org.au/uploads/cica_prof_standards_booklet.pdf
Career Development
Standards & Guidelines
Core Competencies
•
•
•
•
Professional Behaviour
Interpersonal Competence
Career Development Knowledge
Needs Assessment and Referral
Specializations
• Assessment
• Facilitated and Individual Group
Learning
• Career Counselling
• Information and Resource
Management
• Work Development
• Community Capacity Building
Source:
http://career-dev-guidelines.org/career_dev/index.php/the-standards-guidelines
Competency-Based CDP Training (CCDF)
Career Development Foundations
Career Development Theories
Career Development Process
Assessment
Career Service Challenges
Ethics
Using LMI in Career Development
Facilitating Learning
Work Search
Community Capacity Building
National Employment
Counseling Competencies (NECA)
Counseling Skills
Individual and Group Assessment Skills
Group Counseling
Development and Use of Employment-Related Information
Computer Related Skills
Employment Plan Development, Implementation and Case Management
Placement Skills
Community Relationship Skills
Workload Management and Intra-Office Relationship Skills
Professional Development Skills
Common Themes
GETTING STARTED
Career Education Benchmarks (NZ)
Year 7 and 8
Secondary
Leadership
Student
Career Mgmt
Competencies
Programme
Delivery
Leadership
Tertiary
Employer/
Industry
Engagement
Student
Student
Career Mgmt Career Mgmt
Competencies Competencies
Transition to
Programmes
Organization
Information
Secondary
and
Engagement
Systems
School
Services
Student
Engagement
Source: http://www.careers.govt.nz/educatorspractitioners/planning/career-education-benchmarks/benchmarks/
Career Management Professional
Program (Canada)
12
Courses
3
Specializations
•
•
•
•
•
2 weeks, 20 hours
Asynchronous, facilitated online training
Partnership with Yorkville University
Mapped to Canadian S&Gs
Pre-Approved CEUs
• CDP Essentials (10 courses)
• GCDF-CA (11 courses)
• EVGP (7 courses)
CCDF Competency-Based CDP Training
(Canada)
Format
Focus
Partnerships
PreApproved
• 18-45 hours per course
• Blended delivery
• Participant needs/realities (e.g., culture)
• Workplace application (i.e., professional and
organizational development)
• Governments
• First Nations and Inuit organizations
• Post-secondary institutions
• IAEVG
• GCDF
Working Ahead, Moving Forward™
(US)
12 weeks, 2 reading breaks
• Asynchronous, facilitated online training
• Approved GCDF-US training
Participants will
• Understand the history, scope, ethics and theory of
Employment Counseling, Career and Workforce
Development
• Become familiar with the varied roles of career
development facilitators
• Define and describe the 12 GCDF competencies
• Be prepared to assemble their GCDF applications
3 Options for Credentialing
Develop
New
Program for
an Existing
Credential
Establish a
New
Credential
for Your
Existing
Program
Align
Existing
Program to
an Existing
Credential
Aligning Existing Program
to Credentials
Challenges
• Mapping can be awkward
• Investment of time and
money can be substantial
• Clear communication of
course content may be
difficult
• Learning systems and
requirements may be
unfamiliar
• Connecting across
international borders is
challenging
Benefits
• Establish/enhance
credibility of your
program
• Provide quality assurance
to students
• Promote sector
professionalism
Developing a New Program
Challenges
• Investment of time and
money can be substantial
• Starting from scratch
• No existing course
content/resources
• Need to identify
qualified instructors
• May need to pilot
program / go through
institutional review
• Marketing an “unknown”
program is difficult
Benefits
• Provide clear alignment to
credential
• Use existing framework to
structure program
• Establish credibility of
your program
• Provide quality assurance
to students
• Promote sector
professionalism
SHARING
CASE EXAMPLES
Closing Thoughts
What do you see as the benefits of
training, certification, and credentialing?
What are some
challenges and frustrations?

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