Slide 1

Report
2nd Public Meeting - Options
March 30, 2010
Agenda
 Overview of Water Issues
 What is a WIRP?
 Purpose of WIRP
 Evaluation Process
 WIRP Objectives
 Options Brainstorming
 Initial Categories of Options
 Closing
Sources of Water Supply
Local Groundwater
35%
Imported Water
from MWD*
65%
* MWD - Metropolitan Water District
Overview of Water Issues
State Water
Project
Colorado River
Aqueduct
Local
Other Imported Water Issues
MWD Water Costs
• In 2009, full service water rates
increased 15% (3 times the previous
year’s increase)
• Over next five years, MWD expects
annual double-digit rate increases
• Bay-Delta solution is expected to cost
billions for MWD alone
Climate Change
• California DWR estimates that future
climate change could reduce SWP
supplies statewide by as much as
15% by 2030
Source Water Quality
Groundwater
 Pumped from the
Raymond Basin
 Contamination issues
 Declining
groundwater levels
 Reduced pumping
rights by 20%
Water Integrated Resources Plan
IRP Definition
“Comprehensive approach to evaluating supply-side
& demand-side resource alternatives with respect
to explicitly defined & often conflicting objectives.”
AWWA, 1994
Main features:
 Open and participatory decision process
 Planning scenarios that consider changing
conditions
 Consideration of institutional context
9
IRP’s in relation to other plans
Strategic
Planning
(IRP’s; conceptual
analysis; policylevel planning;
examining trade-off
among resource
alternatives)
UWMP
(Urban Water
Management Plan
required by State
every 5 years;
compares demand
and supply only)
Master
Planning
(Capital
Improvement
Plans, detailed
facility studies,
operational
analysis)
Prelim
Design
(Environmental
Impact Review,
Project
Implementation)
Mission Statement
The Pasadena Water Integrated Resources
Plan will provide an achievable, long-term
strategy to meet current and future water
needs. The goals of the WIRP are to
sustainably and cost-effectively address
local and regional water supply and
demand issues, reflect community values,
and adapt to changing conditions.
Evaluation Process
Portfolio
Analyses
Supply & Demand
Options
(building blocks)
Build Portfolios
(using themes)
Raw Performance
Score Card
Rank
Portfolios
Define Planning
Objectives &
Performance
Measures
Refine
Analysis
Preferred
Strategy
WIRP Objectives
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Provide a reliable water supply
Maintain affordability, while addressing fairness and equity
Ensure safe, high-quality drinking water
Protect source waters and the environment
Protect cultural and recreational resources
Maximize efficiency of water use
Maintain quality of life and positive economic climate
Reduce risk and maximize opportunities
Ensure public safety
Reduce energy footprint for water operations
Status Quo Approach
Water Supply
How vulnerable to
climate change,
what impact on
water quality, how
much does this cost
Imported
Water
Existing
Groundwater
Planning Horizon
Growth Neutral
New Conservation
Imported
Water
Existing
Groundwater
New Local Supplies
New Conservation
Imported
Water
New Local
Supply
Existing
Groundwater
Ideas from
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st
1
Public Meeting
Reduce percentage or portion of water used for landscaping – currently 50-70 overall
Incentivize water conservation with energy nexus
Real time notification to customers on water usage
Have landlords provide water efficient fixtures, motivate/implement tenant conservation
Educate people about irrigation and runoff – soil types/swales, etc.
Encourage more efficient irrigation, e.g. drip
Convert turf areas
Partner with large educational institutions, landscape changes/public education
opportunity – new paradigm
Landscaping contests, free landscaping to winners, etc.
Explore integration of reclaimed water into City’s supply
Capture what we throw away – sinks, showers, etc.
Look at greywater systems
Evaluate water catchments for rainwater, e.g. natural depressions
Identify areas that are more suitable for groundwater recharge – consider zoning tools to
protect and maximize recharge
Incentivize/rebates for redesign of sites to capture more runoff
Reduce imperviousness, reasonable but meaningful X % per year Encourage new
development to store runoff on site
Partner with other resource agencies to develop options that might otherwise be too
expensive, e.g. solar for desal
Conservation/
Demand
Management
Recycled
Graywater
On-site stormwater
capture/
Porous pavement
Ocean
Desalination
Partnership

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