summary-of-performance-leadership

Report
Summary of Performance
Valecia Davis, Coordinator
Office of Special Education
• The reauthorized Individuals with Disabilities
Education Act (IDEA) was signed into law on Dec. 3,
2004, and the provisions of the act became effective
on July 1, 2005. It included several changes to
transition services for students with disabilities.
• The changes included:
• Exception to requirements for evaluation before a change
in eligibility; and
• Requirement of a summary of performance.
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• An evaluation is not required before the
termination of a child's eligibility if the
termination of eligibility is:
• Due to graduation from secondary school with a
regular high school diploma; or
• Because the child exceeds the age of eligibility
for a free and appropriate public education
(FAPE) under State law.
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• For a child whose eligibility under IDEA
terminates under circumstances described
above, an LEA must provide the child with a
summary of his or her academic achievement
and functional performance, including
recommendations on how to assist the child
in meeting postsecondary goals.
34 C.F.R. §300.305(e)(3)
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The intent of the SOP is to provide crucial
information to those individuals who may assist
the student in the future, providing that
information when it is most timely makes sense.
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The SOP is a document:
• For students transitioning to postsecondary
education or training, employment, and independent
living;
• Serves as a link between high school and postsecondary experiences; and
• Is a primary resource by which postsecondary
agencies determine eligibility for services and
accommodations for students with disabilities.
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• Summarizes the student’s academic achievement
and functional performance in the context for how
the student will transfer into a postsecondary setting;
• Summarizes the student’s strengths, assessments,
evaluation results, and other data;
• Includes recommendations for assisting the student
in meeting his or her postsecondary goals;
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• Includes recommendations of potential supports
and/or accommodations;
• Is completed during the student’s exit year in lieu of
an exit evaluation; and
• Is a separate document from the Individualized
Education Program (IEP) which condenses and
organizes key information that should follow the
student after he/she exits high school.
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The SOP is required for students that:
• Exit with a Standard High School Diploma;
• Exit due to exceeding the age of eligibility; or
• Are participating in the district General
Education Development (GED) Option
Program.
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The SOP is not required for students that
exit special education:
• With a GED (Adult Basic Education route);
• With an alternative diploma (MOD or
Certificate of Completion); or
• Whose eligibility for services under Part B has
not terminated (this includes students that
drop out of school).
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• The SOP should be completed no later than
the final year of a student’s education.
• The process may begin at any time because
there is not standard timeframe for
developing an SOP.
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• The process should begin in enough time for
the LEA, parents, and student to develop a
document that is available when the student
needs it.
• Educators could choose to prepare an SOP
earlier for students who are:
•
•
•
•
Transferring to another school;
Meeting with the Disability Coordinator at a college;
Applying for Vocational Rehabilitation Services; or
Visiting an Adjustment Training Center.
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When developing the SOP for and with the student,
consider the following criteria for content in SOP.
• Information that facilitates the transfer of critical
information that leads to effective and successful
participation in all postsecondary settings/domains:
work, education, community, and home.
• Information that incorporates achievements and up-todate academic, personal, career, and employment
levels of performance.
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• Student goals are included and are provided as much
as possible in the student’s own language or terms (so
that he or she will recognize and remember) and are
based on current or recent assessment findings.
• Information is based on direct, firsthand input from the
student and other transition team members and
stakeholders: teachers, parents, siblings, adult service
providers, etc.
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• Data and information, including disabilities, are written
in functional terms rather than school system jargon.
• Accommodations are presented in functional terms,
preferably in the student’s own language
• Content includes information specifically requested by
(or which typically is required or used by) the student,
adult service providers, postsecondary education and
training personnel.
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• Information is written and/or presented (in some cases,
it could include photographs or illustrations) in ways
that are easily understood and are immediately useful
for students, adult service providers, postsecondary
education personnel, and/or employers.
• Artifacts, documentation, and other items that are
attached are identified within the SOP content,
preferably in a highly visible space.
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• Signatures by the student and other team members
verify that the contents have been explained and
agreed upon.
• Information that presents an accurate depiction of the
student, even if additional space is needed—the form
should fit the student, not the other way around.
(Leconte, P.J., 2006)
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• IDEA left it up to states and districts to create
their own SOPs.
• There are two types of SOPs:
• Teacher-Directed SOPs
• Example: Mississippi adopted form created by the
National Transition Documentation Summit
• Student-Directed SOPs
• Example: Oklahoma State Department of Education
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Recommended Summary of
Performance Document
• IDEA allows states and districts to develop their
own SOP policies and forms.
• Mississippi Department of Education, Office of
Special Education adopted the national template
developed by the National Transition
Documentation Summit © 2005, which included
representation from the
• Association on Higher Education,
• Council for Exceptional Children’s Division on
Career Development and Transition (CDT)
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• Division on Learning Disabilities (DLD),
• The National Joint Committee on Learning
Disabilities (NJCLD),
• Council on Education Diagnostic Services (CEDS),
• The Learning Disability Association (LDA), and
• The National Center on Learning Disabilities
(NCLD).
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The National Transition Documentation Summit
worked collaboratively to develop a model
template that would:
• Bridge the documentation gap between IDEA,
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and ADA;
• Meet the needs of students and adult service
providers; and
• Was accepted by postsecondary institutions and
employers.
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The national template identified five (5)
components in the SOP.
•
•
•
•
Background Information
Student’s Postsecondary Goals
Summary of Performance
Recommendations to Assist the Student in
Meeting Postsecondary Goals
• Student Input
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The background information section provides a
range of demographic information related to the
student and requires the student to provide the most
up-to-date identification/contact information.
• The background information must be updated prior to
the student existing high school.
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• Indicator 14 of the State Performance Plan/Annual
Performance Report (SPP/APR) requires states to
report outcomes of of students with disabilities one
year after exiting high school.
• Information in this section will provide contact
information that can be used to find the student posthigh school.
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The background information section request that a
copy of the student’s most recent formal and
informal assessment reports that document the
student’s disability and provides information to assist
in post-high school planning is attached to the SOP.
• It is important to include the evaluation data because
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and ADA require
documentation of the disability that validates
functional limitations and the need for
accommodations.
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The postsecondary goals
• Should indicate the post-school environment(s) the
student intends to transition to upon completion of
high school;
• Should be documented on the student’s most
current Individualized Education Plan (IEP); and
• Should reflect what the student intends to
accomplish after existing secondary education.
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• As with the IEP, the SOP should include
postsecondary goals based upon ageappropriate transition assessments related to
training, education, employment and, where
appropriate, independent living skills.
• The goals serve as the foundation of the
document and sets the direction for the focus of
the contents of the remaining sections of the
SOP.
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The Summary of Performance includes
three critical areas:
• Academic,
• Cognitive and
• Functional levels of performance.
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As with the IEP, the Summary of Performance
should identify:
• How the student’s disability affects involvement
and progress in the general curriculum;
• A detailed description of the student’s academic
and functional performance; and
• The strengths of the student.
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• All parts of this section will not be relevant to all
students.
• It may be appropriate to document some areas as “not
applicable.”
• Professional judgment should be used to
determine where one documents a specific skill.
• Describe the student’s strengths and needs.
• Test scores can be included, but repeating test scores
and/or stating “see attached report” will result in a
missed opportunity for the student to increase his/her
understanding of his/her strengths and needs.
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• Next to each specified area, document the student’s
present level of performance and the
accommodations, modifications and assistive
technology that were essential in high school to
assist the student in achieving progress.
• Suggestions should be specific and objective and must
reflect the data available.
• Specific learning strategies can be listed in this
column, even though learning strategies are not formal
accommodations or modifications.
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The Supplementary Aids and Services page of
the student’s IEP may serve as a resource for
identifying the accommodations, modifications,
and assistive technology that ensured
educational benefit from high school
experiences.
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Describes any essential accommodations,
assistive technology, supportive services, or
general areas of need that students will
require to enhance access in a post-high
school environment, including higher
education, training, employment,
independent living and/or community
participation.
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• Consider the information documented in the previous
sections of the SOP.
• Write any recommendations for assisting, supporting,
and/or accommodating the student in meeting the
student’s postsecondary goal.
• Anticipate the student’s needs in the student’s desired
postsecondary setting(s).
• Identify what supports will help the student meet those
needs.
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• Understand that employers and postsecondary
education personnel have different expectations and
obligations then secondary school personnel.
• Be selective in the recommendations so that
expectations are not created for accommodations or
supports that colleges and employers are not required to
provide.
• Explain to students and parents that the
recommendations are not legally binding.
• Recommendations need to be supported by multiple
sources of data.
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The student’s contribution can help:
• Educators complete the SOP.
• The student to better understand and discuss the
impact of his/her disability on academic and functional
performance in the postsecondary setting.
• The student evaluate what accommodations work best.
• Postsecondary personnel to more clearly understand
the student’s strengths and the impact of the disability
on this student.
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Student-Directed Summary of
Performance
• An emphasis is placed on giving students an opportunity
to practice self-determination.
• Self-determination is defined as
• “a combination of skills, knowledge, and beliefs that enable
them to engage in goal-directed, self-regulated,
autonomous behavior.
• An understanding of oneself as capable and effective are
essential to self-determination.
• When acting on the basis of these skills and attitudes,
individuals have greater ability to take control of their lives
and assume the role of successful adults in our society.”
(Field. S.& Hoffman, A., 2007)
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The four (4) components to an SD-SOP are
as follows:
•
•
•
•
My Summary of Performance
My Perception of My Disability
School’s Perception on My Disability
School-Produced Summary of My Academic
Achievement and Functional Performance
(Sample Document from the Oklahoma State Department of Education)
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• My Summary of Performance is based on the
student’s interest, strengths, and preferences
their desired for postsecondary goals for one
year after high school.
• Recommendations for accommodations and
supports that will assist the student in achieving
the goals should be provided by school staff and
other service providers.
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To complete My Perception of My Disability,
students need to
• Describe their primary and secondary disabilities;
• Describe how they feel their disability affects their
performance;
• Describe what supports are helpful; and
• Identify any accommodations that were helpful
within in high school.
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• School personnel and other service providers will
complete Section 3 no later than the student’s junior
year of high school.
• They should describe how the student’s disability
affects their performance and what accommodation
have been helpful.
• The description of the accommodations should
include how it was used, in what situations, and to
what degree.
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• School personnel and other service providers
will complete Section 4 and review annually to
determine assessment needs.
• Recent formal and informal assessment should
be attached to the SD-SOP.
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• After completion of the SD-SOP, the student will
present it to their IEP Committee during their exit IEP
meeting.
• During the student’s high school career, he/she will use
the information learned from the SOP to add to their
IEP meeting discussions and to help plan for ongoing
class and program selection.
• Student may consider using the SOP to discuss job site
accommodations with their employers.
(Martin, Van Dycke, S’Ottavio, and Nickerson, 2007)
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• A well constructed and comprehensive SOP is a
blueprint that provides past evidence of
academic accommodations that have been
utilized and the extent to which such
accommodations has been effective.
• The focus of the documentation presented to the
postsecondary level should be on the current
limitations imposed by the student’s specific
impairment.
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• Secondary personnel, parent(s), and student(s)
need to be aware that postsecondary level
institutions have different expectations and
obligations than secondary schools.
• It has to be clear that the specific accommodations
or supports are just recommendations that do not
limit the independent decision-making of personnel
at the postsecondary level.
(Shaw, S. F., Keenan, W. R., Madaus, J. W., and Banerjee, M. 2010)
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• Section 504 and ADA require students to selfidentify and provide documentation of their
disability in order to be eligible for accommodations
and services in postsecondary settings.
• Students with disabilities must have opportunities to
make choices and decision and to practice self-advocacy
skills to prepare to transition after high school.
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• Postsecondary schools provide supports based on
what is reasonable rather than what is
appropriate or least restrictive.
• Support services and accommodations are based on
providing access to content and reduction of barriers
to learning rather than promoting achievement.
• Example: Student may receive a note-taker in a
postsecondary setting instead of a tutor.
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• Documentation of disabilities varies widely
between postsecondary schools and students must
be aware of those requirements as they apply to
the different schools.
• Most postsecondary schools do provide some level
of support, but the type and scope of this support
varies widely among institutions.
(Kochhar-Bryant, C. A. and Izzo, M. V., 2006)
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Confidentiality and the SOP
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It is recommended that:
• Student should not share their SOPs unless they need to
negotiate accommodations (Izzo and Kochhar-Bryant,
2006).
• Students that decide to disclose their disabilities and seek
accommodations from employers must decide what SOP
information they will share.
• Employers’ concerns usually relate to documenting the
existence of a disability in order to determine reasonable
accommodations, but most do not have specific disability
documentation guidelines (Shaw, 2006).
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• The SOP may be protected by developing specific
school release form for the the SOP that releases
it directly to the student who has reached age of
majority.
• Students/parents should provide access to the
SOP, or portions of it, only to those who need the
information in order to provide postsecondary
disabilities, accommodations, and modifications.
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• National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance
Center (NSTTAC)
• http://www.nsttac.org/content/summary-performanceresources
• Zarrow Center for Learning Excellence
• https://www.ou.edu/content/education/centers-andpartnerships/zarrow/presentations.html
• Association on Higher Education and Disability
• http://www.ahead.org/resources/idea/introduction
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• Dukes, L., Shaw, S., & Madaus, J. (2007). How to compete
a summary of performance for students exiting to
postsecondary education. Assessment for Effective
Intervention, 32(3), 143-159.
• Field, S., & Hoffman, A. (2007). Self-Determination in
secondary transition assessment. Assessment for Effective
Intervention, 32(3), 181-190.
• Izzo, M., & Kochhar-Bryant, C. (2006). Implementing the
SOP for effective transition: Two case studies. Career
Development for Exceptional Individuals, 29, 100-107.
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• Kochhar-Bryant, C. (2007). The summary of performance
as transition passport to employment and independent
living. Assessment for Effective Intervention, 32(3), 160170.
• Kochhar-Bryant, C., & Izzo, M. (2006). Access to post-high
school services: Transition assessment and the summary of
performance. Career Development for Exceptional
Individuals, 29, 70-89.
• Lamb, P. (2007). Implications of the summary of
performance for vocational rehabilitation counselors. Career
Development for Exceptional Individuals, 30, 3-12.
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• Leconte, P. (2006). The evolution of career, vocational, and
transition assessment: Implications for the summary of
performance. Career Development for Exceptional
Individuals, 29, 114-124.
• Madaus, J., Bigaj, S., Chafouleas, S., & Simonsen, B.
(2006). What key information can be included in a
comprehensive summary of performance? Career
Development for Exceptional Individuals, 29, 90-99.
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• Martin, J., Van Dycke, J., D'Ottavio, M., & Nickerson, K.
(2007). The student-directed summary of performance:
Increasing student and family involvement in the transition
planning process. Career Development for Exceptional
Individuals, 30, 13-26.
• Shaw, F., Keenan, W., Madaus, J., & Banerjee, M. (2010).
Disability documentation, the americans with disabilities act
amendment act, and the summary of performance: How are
they linked? Journal of Postsecondary Education and
Disability, 22 (3), 142-150.
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Valecia Davis
[email protected]
Desma McElveen
[email protected]
Tanya Bradley
[email protected]
Office of Special Education
Division of Technical Assistance
(601) 359-3498
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