Active Learning

Report
Behavior: BIPs and FBAs
day1
SPED 586: Methods
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Review FBAs
• What was the behavior?
• How did the teacher identify and define that
behavior?
• What was the intervention that the teacher
chose to use?
• Why did they choose that intervention?
• What was the effectiveness?
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Setting up FBAs
• Setting events and antecedents
• Consequence-based
• Behavior Support Plans: The teaching plan
3
Setting Events and Antecedents
• Set the student up for academic and behavioral success
• Consider these antecedents
–
–
–
–
–
Classroom arrangements
Seat assignments
Arrival and dismissal procedures
Short instructional time
Quick activities
• Consider these setting events
– Breakfast
– Hallway interactions
– Family issues
• Let the student know you understand and that you
care. Change expectations for the child.
4
Consequence-based Interventions
• Work to stop or reduce consequences
– Peer humiliation and ridicule
– Sensory responses
– Teacher reprimands and attention to inappropriate behav
• Work to increase positive consequences
– Attention to appropriate behavs
– Free time
• Consequences work for those who have minimal or
short-term behavioral concerns
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Building a Behavior Support Plan
The plan should
1. indicate how staff, family, or support
personnel will change and not just focus
on how the person of concern will change
2. be directly based on the functional
assessment information
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Building a Behavior Support Plan
The plan should
3. be technically sound
4. Be a good fit with values, resources, and
skills of persons responsible for
implementation
1. (O’Neil, et al., 1997)
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1. Indicate how staff, family, or support personnel
will change and not just focus on how the person
of concern will change
• Changes to:
– Physical setting
– Curriculum
– Medication
– Schedule
– Methods of instruction
– Rewards and punishers
» (O’Neil, et al., 1997)
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2. Be directly based on the functional
assessment information
• List summary statements in BIP
– Foundation for plan
– All intervention procedures must be consistent
with this statement
• Competing behaviors model
– BIP indicates what person should not do
– BIP indicates what person should do
» (O’Neil, et al., 1997)
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3. Be technically sound
• Make problem behaviors
–Irrelevant
• Reduce aversive features of task
• Increase activity and interest
» (O’Neil, et al., 1997)
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–Inefficient
• Physical effort required to perform
behavior
• Number of times behavior must be
performed before reinforcement
• Time delay between first problem
behavior and reinforcement
» (O’Neil, et al., 1997)
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–Ineffective
• Extinction of problem behavior
» (O’Neil, et al., 1997)
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Competing Behavior Model
The link between the FBA and the BIP
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Diagram functional assessment
summary statements
Setting Event Antecedent Problem Consequence
Little sleep
Difficult
Vomiting
Escape task
task
Negative
Interactions
Biology
lecture
Talking out
Peer attention
(O’Neil, et al., 1997)
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Define alternative behaviors and
contingencies associated with those
behaviors
Desired Consequence
Do the work
Praise
More tasks
Setting Event
Little sleep
Antecedent
Problem
Difficult Vomiting
task
Consequence
Escape task
Replacement
Ask for a break
(O’Neil, et al., 1997)
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Setting Event Antecedent Problem
Consequence
No setting
Independent
Whine, talk Teacher
Events assignment out, refuse attention
Identified
to work,
tantrum
(O’Neil, et al., 1997)
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Desired Consequence
Work w/
little attn
Setting Event
Antecedent
Problem
None identified Independent
Whine, talk out
work
refuse, tantrum
More work
Consequence
Teacher attention
Replacement
Ask for help/
teacher attention
(O’Neil, et al., 1997)
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Interventions:
Replacement behaviors
•
•
•
•
•
Should be as normal and typical as possible
Useful class-wide
Useful behavior/skill for student to learn?
Useful in multiple settings?
Age and developmentally appropriate?
– Chandler & Dahlquist, 2002
Replacement behaviors should be…
• Acceptable to
– Student
– Family
– Teachers
– Administrators
– Team members
– School and greater community
– Chandler & Dahlquist, 2002
Replacement behaviors should be …
• Efficient
– Less time
– More reinforcement
– Produce function more frequently
– More immediate reinforcement
• Incompatible with challenging behaviors
– When appropriate
– Chandler & Dahlquist, 2002
Crises Plans and Interventions
• Some behaviors threaten the safety of
students and adults in the classroom or school
environment
• If violence is an issue you need to make a
crisis plan to be enacted when the problem
arises. Liken this plan to that of a tornado or
fire (Kerr & Nelson, 2006).
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Crisis Plan do’s and don'ts (Kerr and Nelson, 2006)
Do’s
Don’ts
• Keep your communication simple,
clear, and brief (two sentence
max)
• Ask only 1 question at a time
• Stick to the current issue
• Stay calm
• Turn off high sensory items
• Watch body language
• Acknowledge what you have
heard
• Reconvene in a low-stress time
and place
• Try to argue out false or
delusional beliefs
• Give unsolicited advice
• Interrupt the other person
• Talk down or try to explain a basic
principle to the other person
• Name call
• Generalize (always or never)
• Yell and shout
• Link the behavior to a mental
illness symptom
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Case Study review
• Who was involved?
• What is the behavior that is of concern?
• What background info is linked to this concern? Is
this background appropriate to the investigation?
• What did observations reveal?
• What did interviews with stakeholders reveal?
• What would you rather the student do?
• Hypothesize the function.
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Upcoming Events
• ED: Cases 8 and 10
• Begin reading Gersten et al Reading Practice
Guide (due 9-28)
• Outline Unit Plan (draft due 10-12; final due
12-7)
• Aggressive behavior next week (start reading
power point)
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