Breakfast with the Chiefs

Report
Breakfast with the Chiefs
Re-focusing from Efficiency to Appropriateness:
The Value of Understanding Variation in Healthcare
June 10, 2014
Hospitals and health
system funding need
to shift focus
from improving
efficiency to
reducing variation in
clinical practice
Hospitals and health
system funding need
to shift focus
from improving
efficiency to
reducing variation in
clinical practice
Re-focusing from Efficiency to Appropriateness:
The Value of Understanding Variation in Healthcare

Ontario hospitals have focused on becoming the most
efficient hospitals in Canada



Need (and demand) for health care will increase faster
than our ability (or willingness) to pay for it


Ongoing search for more cost-effective ways to respond to needs
Diminishing returns from efficiency, and greater
awareness of evidence-based health care, will force
attention to appropriateness


Shortest length of stay in acute care
Lowest worked hours per RIW weighted case
E.g. Choosing Wisely Canada
To both:


Reduce costs
Improve quality
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
4
Ontario hospitals
are running out of
opportunities to
further improve
efficiency to
reduce costs
Health Spending per Capita
Total Health Spending per Capita, by Province, 2013f
$8,000
$5,531
$5,775 $5,835
$6,354 $6,474
$6,514 $6,626 $6,633
$6,787
$7,132
Public
Private
$4,000
$0
Que.
B.C.
Ont.
P.E.I.
N.B.
N.S.
Sask.
Man.
Alta.
N.L.
Canada $5,988
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
Note: f: forecast.
Sources: National Health Expenditure Database, CIHI; Statistics Canada.
6
Ontario Has Lowest Public Health
Spending per Capita of all the provinces
Total Health Spending per Capita, by Province, 2013f
$8,000
$5,531
$5,775 $5,835
$6,354 $6,474
$6,514 $6,626 $6,633
$6,787
$7,132
Public
Private
$4,000
$0
Que.
B.C.
Ont.
P.E.I.
N.B.
N.S.
Sask.
Man.
Alta.
N.L.
Canada $5,988
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
Note: f: forecast.
Sources: National Health Expenditure Database, CIHI; Statistics Canada.
7
Proportion of health spending on hospitals
in Canada has declined in the last decade from 35% to 29%
1993
2013 f
19%
15%
29%
35%
11%
10%
11%
11%
15%
13%
15%
16%
Hospitals
Physicians
Drugs
Other Professionals
Other Institutions
Other Expenditures
Note: f: forecast. Source: National Health Expenditure Database, CIHI.
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
8
Per Capita hospital spending is growing
significantly more slowly in Ontario than other provinces.



Change in
Age/Gender
Standardized Per
Capita Hospital
Expenditure 1996
to 2011
From 1996 to
2011, Ontario has
had the lowest %
increase in per
capita hospital
expenditures
In 2011, only
Quebec had lower
per capita hospital
expenditures
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
Province
/Territory
Nunavut
NWT
Nfld. Lab.
Alberta
New Brunswick
Yukon
Nova Scotia
Manitoba
PEI
BC
Saskatchewan
Canada
Ontario
Quebec
2011
1996
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
--1,154
808
604
797
649
723
749
754
683
587
677
696
639
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
3,914
3,078
2,398
1,960
1,822
1,800
1,691
1,670
1,652
1,556
1,548
1,508
1,377
1,318
$ Increase
%
1996 to
Change
2011
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
1,924
1,591
1,356
1,025
1,151
968
921
898
873
961
832
681
680
167%
197%
225%
129%
177%
134%
123%
119%
128%
164%
123%
98%
106%
9
Ontario has lowest number of hospital beds
per 1,000 population of all the provinces


Ontario has
also been
reducing its
hospital
capacity
Now has
lowest
number of
hospital
beds per
1,000
population
of all the
provinces
2012 HospitalHospital
Beds (AllBeds
Types)
1,000 Population
perper
1,000
N.B.
4.63
N.L.
4.62
N.W.T.
3.56
N.S.
3.42
Man.
3.41
Sask.
3.36
P.E.I.
3.36
B.C.
3.03
Alta.
2.90
Total
2.79
Ont.
Y.T.
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
2.34
1.30
10
Enormous variation
in hospital utilization
rates in Canada and
across Ontario; a
potential problem
and a potential
opportunity
Enormous variation
in hospital utilization
rates in Canada and
across Ontario; a
potential problem
and a potential
opportunity
Variations in Health Care in Canada –
Hysterectomy Rates



Within Ontario,
age/gender
standardized
hysterectomy rates
for residents of the
NE LHIN are 3 times
the rates for Toronto
residents
Hysterectomy rate
for SW LHIN more
than twice the rate
for Toronto residents
Per 100,000 Age/Gender
Standardized Population
Hysterectomy Rate
North East, LHIN
Saskatchewan
New Brunswick
Nova Scotia
South West, LHIN
Erie St. Clair, LHIN
Newfoundland and Labrador
Prince Edward Island
Alberta
Waterloo Wellington, LHIN
Nth. Simcoe Musk., LHIN
Yukon Territory
HNHB, LHIN
South East, LHIN
Manitoba
North West, LHIN
Champlain, LHIN
Canada
Northwest Territories
Central East, LHIN
Ontario
Nunavut
Québec
British Columbia
Central West, LHIN
Central, LHIN
Mississauga Halton, LHIN
Toronto Central, LHIN
0
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
100
200
300
400
500
600
13
Variations in Health Care in Canada –
Cardiac Revascularization Rates



Residents of NW
LHIN have double the
revascularization rate
of residents of the
Waterloo Wellington
LHIN
Residents of SE LHIN
(& CW LHIN) have
revascularizations
rates 50% higher than
WW LHIN
Per 100,000 Age/Gender
Standardized Population
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
Cardiac Revascularization Rate
North West, LHIN
North East, LHIN
Yukon Territory
South East, LHIN
Central West, LHIN
Saskatchewan
Manitoba
New Brunswick
HNHB, LHIN
Nth. Simcoe Musk., LHIN
Erie St. Clair, LHIN
Ontario
Canada
Northwest Territories
Champlain, LHIN
Central East, LHIN
Newfoundland and Labrador
British Columbia
Alberta
Nova Scotia
Central, LHIN
Mississauga Halton, LHIN
Prince Edward Island
South West, LHIN
Toronto Central, LHIN
Nunavut
Waterloo Wellington, LHIN
0
50
100 150 200 250 300 350 400
14
Variation in Hospital Care in Ontario
COPD



Rate of
hospitalization for
COPD is 3.6 times
higher for NW LHIN
residents than for
Central LHIN
residents
Rate of
hospitalization for
COPD is 2.5 times
higher for SE LHIN
residents than for
Central LHIN
residents
Hospitalizations per
10,000 Age/Gender
Standardized
Population
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
COPD
North West
North East
South East
Nth. Simcoe Musk.
Erie St. Clair
Champlain
South West
HNHB
Ontario
Waterloo Well.
Central East
Toronto Central
Central West
Miss. Halton
Central
36
32
25
23
21
21
21
19
18
18
17
13
13
12
10
15
Variation in Hospital Care in Ontario
Hip Replacement



Rate of
hospitalization for
hip replacement for
South West
residents is almost
double the rate for
Central West
residents
Similar wait times:
SW wait time is
220 days, CW wait
time is 234 days
Hospitalizations per
10,000 Age/Gender
Standardized
Population
Hip Replacement
South West
North West
Erie St. Clair
North East
Nth. Simcoe Musk.
Champlain
HNHB
South East
Waterloo Well.
Ontario
Toronto Central
Central East
Miss. Halton
Central
Central West
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
11.5
11.1
10.9
10.8
10.7
10.2
10.1
10.0
9.8
9.0
8.3
7.7
7.4
6.7
6.2
16
Admission Through ED: % of ED Chest
Pain Patients Admitted to IP Acute Care



In highest volume
Ontario EDs, % of ED
patients with Chest
Pain admitted to IP
care ranges from 6%
to almost 30%
An ED patient with
chest pain is 5 times
more likely to be
admitted to IP care at
HHS than at SMGH
EDs with > 400 Chest Pain
Visits/Yr in 2012/13
Diagnosis: Chest Pain, CTAS Level: (All), Age
Group: 75+
Halton Healthcare
Hamilton HSC
Trillium Health Partners
Health Science North
Sunnybrook HSC
St. Joseph's HC, Toronto
Thunder Bay Regional
Southlake Regional HC
North York General
University Health Network
Niagara HS
William Osler HC
Quinte Healthcare
London Health Sciences
York Central Hospital
Rouge Valley HS
Queensway-Carleton…
Humber River Regional
Ottawa Hospital
Lakeridge Health
Scarb. Hosp. - General
St. Mary's General, Kitchener
0%
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
10%
20%
30%
40%
17
Admissions Through ED: % of CTAS 1, 2 & 3
COPD ED Patients Admitted to IP Acute Care



% of ED CTAS 31-3
(urgent & emergent )
patients with COPD
admitted to IP care
ranges from 32% to
almost 63% in
highest volume
Ontario EDs
A COPD patient is
twice as likely to be
admitted to IP care at
WOHC than at QHC
EDs with > 600 COPD
Visits/Yr in 2012/13
Diagnosis: COPD, CTAS Level: 1, 2, and 3, Age
Group: (All)
William Osler HC
Trillium Health Partners
Hamilton HSC
Kingston General Hospital
London Health Sciences
Peterborough Regional HC
St. Joseph's HCS, Hamilton
Ottawa Hospital
St. Mary's General, Kitchener
Royal Victoria Hospital Barrie
Toronto East General
Niagara HS
Thunder Bay Regional
Lakeridge Health
Cornwall Community Hospital
Grey Bruce HS
Quinte Healthcare
0%
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
20%
40%
60%
80%
18
Admissions Through ED: % of ED
Paed. Asthma Patients Admitted to IP Acute Care



% of Paediatric ED
patients with Asthma
admitted to IP care
ranges from 7% to
22% in highest
volume Ontario EDs
A paediatric ED
patient with Asthma is
3 times more likely to
be admitted to IP
care at William Osler
than at Halton
Healthcare
EDs with > 200 Paediatric
Asthma Visits in 2012/13
Diagnosis: Asthma, CTAS Level: (All), Age
Group: 00-17
William Osler HC
Trillium Health Partners
Peterborough Regional HC
Hamilton HSC
Southlake Regional HC
York Central Hospital
St. Joseph's HC, Toronto
Grand River Hospital
Niagara HS
Lakeridge Health
North York General
London Health Sciences
Hospital For Sick Children
Quinte Healthcare
CHEO
Humber River Regional
Rouge Valley HS
Grey Bruce HS
Toronto East General
Markham Stouffville Hospital
Scarb. Hosp. - General
Halton Healthcare
0%
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
10%
20%
30%
19
And the issue will
become a bigger
problem as population
grows and ages
Projected % Change in Population by
Age/Gender Cohort 2014 to 2029



Projected
increase in
Ontario
population
from 2014 to
2029 is 18%
Growth of
just over 1%
per year
But growth
is not evenly
distributed
across age
groups
69% increase in
population 65+
140%
120%
15 Yr % Increase
Female
100%
80%
15 Yr % Increase
Male
120% increase
in male
population 85+
60%
40%
20%
0%
-20%
-40%
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
21
Average Annual Per Capita Acute Care
Hospital Cost by Population Age and Gender
$4,000
Female
$3,500
Male
$3,000
Young and
Medium Old
$2,500
$2,000
$1,500
Near Elderly
$1,000
$500
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
90+
85-89
80-84
75-79
70-74
65-69
60-64
55-59
50-54
45-49
40-44
35-39
30-34
25-29
20-24
$15-19

Old - Old
$4,500
10-14

Move from
relatively low
cost use as
‘Near Elderly’
To increasingly
higher cost use
of hospital care
when age past
65 years.
Growth in ‘Old –
Old even more
dramatic
increase in
demand and
costs
$5,000
05-09

Increase in
number of people
over 65 will put
growing pressure
on health system
00-04

22
Other Perspectives on Aging of
Population
Female
$3,500
Male
Baby Boomers
in 15 Years
$3,000
$2,500
$2,000
$1,500
Baby Boomers
Now
$1,000
$500
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
90+
85-89
80-84
75-79
70-74
65-69
60-64
55-59
50-54
45-49
40-44
35-39
30-34
25-29
$20-24

$4,000
15-19

Shift of
fastest
growing age
cohort from
low cost to
high cost
Loss of most
experienced
senior staff
Switch of
baby boomer
from source
of taxation
revenue to
consumers of
tax funded
health care
$4,500
10-14

$5,000
05-09
Aging of baby
boomers in
15 years
means:
00-04

23
Need new models of
payment that reward
providers for
improving quality,
and reducing
unnecessary care
Variations in Health Care, Patient
Preferences & High-Quality Decision Making


“Variations in practice should disturb physicians not
merely because they may indicate wasteful practices
but because of the possibility that such variations do
not optimally serve the best interests of patients.
The health care system should allow variation in
practice, provided that variation is based on patient
clinical differences and preferences rather than on
other factors such as payment method, geography, or
system proclivities.”
Harlan M. Krumholz, MD, SM.
JAMA. 2013;310(2):151
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
25
Reflections on Geographic Variations
in U.S. Health Care

“The key take-home message is that we believe
that there is enormous scope for improving the
efficiency and quality of US health care. The
Dartmouth research suggests that improvements
in both cost and quality can be achieved by
supporting new models of payment that reward
providers for improving quality, managing capacity
wisely, and reducing unnecessary care.”
Jonathan Skinner and Elliott Fisher (5/12/2010)
http://www.dartmouthatlas.org/downloads/press/Skinner_Fisher_DA_05_10.pdf
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
26
Can HSFR, HBAM
and QBP Funding
provide incentives to
best address the
issue of
appropriateness of
care?
How Does the Ontario Health Care
Funding System Address Variation?
MOHLTC HSFR Educational Slides:
 “Prior to developing HBAM, the Ministry and
stakeholders established a set of guiding principles.
The principles stated that HBAM was to:







Provide an evidence-based distribution of funding to LHINs
within the government’s budget limits
Recognize provider characteristics that are accepted to affect
the cost of providing care
Maintain patient freedom to choose their health service
providers
Ensure stability in funding from year to year
Facilitate health sector integration
Encourage quality improvement in health outcomes
Be simple to understand and communicate”
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
28
HBAM Service Models
HBAM service models compare actual weighted
activity for a community with the “expected”
weighted activity
 MOHLTC HBAM Educational Slides:


“What does “Expected” mean in HBAM?
• The term “Expected” is used in a statistical sense, referring to an
“Average”
• “Expected” service is an average level of service based on case
mix, age, SES and rurality specific to the patients to which an
organization provides service
• In this context, “Expected” does not mean optimal”
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
29
2008 MOHLTC Presentation of Strength
of HBAM
“The model’s strength comes from its focus on individual
health care needs and it’s about the entire population of
Ontario. We associate the appropriate costs with those
services and then we get a good picture about what is going
on with the entire population.”
“Some of the highlights of the model, so that you can begin
to understand how we do it: We create a profile of every
last Ontarian; all 12.5 million Ontarians have a profile that is
built through the information sources we have that we can
identify, where individuals get their care.”
“We also have people in this profile who have blanks. There
are lots of us in Ontario who don’t use the health care
system. It’s important to understand where the needs
are and where they’re not. We also look at that.”
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
30
2012/13 HBAM Acute Service Model
Results – ED and Acute Care

Despite significant variation in utilization rates, HBAM Service Model Results
show service provided in almost all LHINs is within 1% of expected
LHIN Name
Erie St. Clair
South West
Waterloo Well.
HNHB
Central West
Miss. Halton
Toronto Central
Central
Central East
South East
Champlain
Nth. Simcoe Musk.
North East
North West
2012/13 ED Weighted Activity
Ratio of
Actual Expected Actual to
Expect.
13,820
13,594 101.7%
23,897
23,988
99.6%
11,717
11,891
98.5%
29,001
28,744 100.9%
11,221
11,217 100.0%
16,828
16,993
99.0%
24,896
24,788 100.4%
23,540
23,685
99.4%
25,254
25,446
99.2%
12,339
12,369
99.8%
24,954
25,091
99.5%
10,341
10,337 100.0%
17,586
17,471 100.7%
8,911
8,687 102.6%
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
2012/13 Acute Care Weighted
Activity
LHIN Name
Actual
Erie St. Clair
South West
Waterloo Well.
HNHB
Central West
Miss. Halton
Toronto Central
Central
Central East
South East
Champlain
Nth. Simcoe Musk.
North East
North West
77,641
154,608
71,953
210,901
67,016
109,450
314,437
148,713
146,589
73,448
168,891
50,151
95,224
39,570
Expected
77,297
153,519
72,519
210,095
67,529
110,174
313,699
149,280
147,069
72,791
168,803
50,319
95,679
39,748
Ratio of
Actual to
Expect.
100.4%
100.7%
99.2%
100.4%
99.2%
99.3%
100.2%
99.6%
99.7%
100.9%
100.1%
99.7%
99.5%
99.6%
31
Rehab Beds per 1,000 Population
Aged 65 and Older


Large variation
in availability
of rehab beds
per population
across LHINs
Efficiency in
acute care
very
dependent on
access to
post-acute
services
Toronto Central
Erie St. Clair
Champlain
North West
Ontario Average
Miss. Halton
South West
HNHB
North East
Central West
Central East
South East
Waterloo Well.
Nth. Simcoe Musk.
Central
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
4.71
2.34
1.29
1.29
1.27
1.18
1.09
0.98
0.93
0.92
0.81
0.76
0.71
0.46
0.41
32
HBAM 2012/13 Inpatient Rehabilitation
Service Model Results

Most LHINs actual
rehab activity was
within 1% of HBAM
expected


Toronto Central provided
slightly less activity than
expected
Central East (with one
fifth the beds per
population as Toronto
Central) provided 6%
more activity than
expected
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
LHIN Name
Central Total
Central East Total
Central West Total
Champlain Total
Erie St. Clair Total
HNHB Total
Miss. Halton Total
North East Total
North West Total
NSM Total
South East Total
South West Total
Toronto Central Total
Waterloo Well. Total
Grand Total
Actual
Expected
Actual
Rehab
Rehab Wtd
Over
Wtd
Cases
Expect.
Cases
4,012
4,003
100%
3,450
3,259
106%
835
830
101%
4,250
4,231
100%
2,224
2,235
100%
3,486
3,482
100%
3,239
3,167
102%
1,430
1,470
97%
646
661
98%
846
937
90%
1,011
1,043
97%
2,464
2,498
99%
7,248
7,311
99%
1,194
1,211
99%
36,335
36,338
100%
33
HBAM Service Model – Person Profile
Original Description:
 “A person profile is created for each Ontario
resident”
Necessary for a true population-based model
 Requires mechanism to assign every person to a
category reflecting their need for care


“Population Risk Adjustment Grouper” (e.g. Johns
Hopkins Aggregates Diagnosis Groups, used by ICES)
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
34
HBAM Service Model – Person Profile
Revised Description:
 “A person profile is created for each Ontario resident
that received care funded by the Ontario Health
Insurance Plan (OHIP) in an Ontario hospital.”
 No longer looks at entire population, only hospital
patients
 Compares intensity of service per patient


If admit patients who would not be admitted in other hospitals,
can reduce average intensity of service and thus will be
characterized as providing less ‘service’ than expected.
More likely to be characterized as under servicing the
‘population’
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
35
% of ED TIA Patients Admitted to IP Acute
Care – 2012/13 Hospitals > 200 Visits
Admission of TIA
patients presenting
at ED varies from
8% to 38% in
highest volume
hospitals
 Other hospitals
admit 80% of TIA
ED patients

Diagnosis: Transient Cerebral Ischaemic Attack,
CTAS Level: (All), Age Group: (All)
Grand River Hospital
Thunder Bay Regional
North York General
Hamilton HSC
Sunnybrook HSC
Halton Healthcare
York Central Hospital
St. Joseph's HCS, Hamilton
Brant Community HCS
Trillium Health Partners
William Osler HC
Peterborough Regional HC
Quinte Healthcare
Rouge Valley HS
University Health Network
Royal Victoria Hospital Barrie
Markham Stouffville Hospital
Southlake Regional HC
London Health Sciences
Lakeridge Health
Hotel-Dieu Grace, Windsor
Niagara HS
Ottawa Hospital
Queensway-Carleton…
Humber River Regional
0%
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
10%
20%
30%
40%
36
Also an issue of
inadvertently
perverse
incentives within
QBP funding
HQO COPD Expert Panel – Incentives
for Inappropriate Utilization


“The Expert Panel recognized that in defining COPD
patient groups largely based on utilization and disposition
there is the potential for perverse incentives to be
created when these groups are assigned “prices” in a
funding methodology. The cost of an average admitted
COPD patient is often more than 10 times the cost of
treating and discharging a COPD patient in the ED. If
prices for the QBP funding system reflect these costs,
care must be taken to ensure hospitals are not
incentivized to admit greater proportions of patients
for a higher payment.
The QBP funding system can potentially mitigate these
risks through bundling payment across the ED and
inpatient settings, and setting policies around
appropriateness.”
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
38
Variation in Admissions via ED for
Selected QBPs

What drives variation in propensity to admit ED
patients?

Severity of illness, comorbidities, availability of ambulatory
and community resources, home support, physician practice,
...or funding system incentives?
Diagnosis: COPD, CTAS Level: (All), Age Group:
(All)
William Osler HC
North York General
Trillium Health Partners
Hamilton HSC
Hamilton HSC
Sunnybrook HSC
Kingston General Hospital
St. Joseph's HC, Toronto
London Health Sciences
Trillium Health Partners
Peterborough Regional HC
University Health Network
St. Joseph's HCS, Hamilton
Niagara HS
Ottawa Hospital
Thunder Bay Regional
St. Mary's General, Kitchener
William Osler HC
Royal Victoria Hospital Barrie
London Health Sciences
Niagara HS
Scarb. Hosp. - General
Thunder Bay Regional
Rouge Valley HS
Hotel-Dieu Grace, Windsor
Ottawa Hospital
Lakeridge Health
Humber River Regional
Cornwall Community Hospital
Hotel-Dieu Grace, Windsor
Quinte Healthcare
Lakeridge Health
Grey Bruce HS
St. Mary's General, Kitchener
0%
20%
40%
60%
Diagnosis: Transient Cerebral Ischaemic Attack,
CTAS Level: (All), Age Group: (All)
Diagnosis: Congestive Heart Failure, CTAS
Level: (All), Age Group: (All)
80%
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
Grand River Hospital
Thunder Bay Regional
North York General
Hamilton HSC
Sunnybrook HSC
Halton Healthcare
York Central Hospital
St. Joseph's HCS, Hamilton
Brant Community HCS
Trillium Health Partners
William Osler HC
Peterborough Regional HC
Quinte Healthcare
Rouge Valley HS
University Health Network
Royal Victoria Hospital Barrie
Markham Stouffville Hospital
Southlake Regional HC
London Health Sciences
Lakeridge Health
Hotel-Dieu Grace, Windsor
Niagara HS
Ottawa Hospital
Queensway-Carleton…
Humber River Regional
0%
50%
100%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
39
Need for HBAM
and QBP funding
to more effectively
address issues of
variation in clinical
practice
Getting funding models to
address variation and incent best practices


Need to return to first principles
A true population-based service funding methodology:



would be based on population need and
would incent appropriate system responses to need
A true quality based procedure funding methodology:

would be based on best practices related to both:
•
•




aligned with best practice evidence
transparent and easily understood
Masking (or ignoring) variation in populations’ use of health services is:



would be based on best practices for the full episode of care
would incent adoption of these evidence-based best practices
Incentives in funding methodologies should be:


Admission decisions and
processes of care
keeping us from addressing significant, potentially inappropriate variations in clinical practices
Leaves us focusing on cost reduction through increasingly elusive improvements in efficiency
It is time to review the current Ontario approaches to health system funding
reform with consideration of a return to and/or a more comprehensive adoption of:


the original, population need-based concept of the HBAM service model
the original evidence based best practice model of QBP funding model
© 2012 Hay Group. All rights reserved
41
Questions
?
Comments

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