Building a Healthier New Brunswick

Report
Building a Healthier New Brunswick
Conference
Welcome
• Jeffrey Vega, President, New Brunswick
Tomorrow
Living a Healthier Life
in New Brunswick
• Jim Cahill, Mayor, City of New Brunswick
The Evolution of
Healthier New Brunswick
• Eric Jahn, MD, Senior Associate Dean for
Community Health, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson
Medical School
Evolution of Healthier New Brunswick
• Established in 2001 as Healthier New Brunswick 2010
• Established as a community based community owned
initiative to improve the health and health care of New
Brunswick
• Detailed community health assessment by Rutgers
Center for State Health Policy
• Organizing activities around four coalitions.
•
•
•
•
Get Fit! New Brunswick Coalition
Lead Poisoning Coalition
Domestic Violence Awareness Coalition
Mental Health and Substance Abuse Coalition
5
Health Care Access
• Early conversations dominated by the need for access to
health care
– Health fairs provided a venue for increased screening and
immunizations
– Provided imperative for expansion of the Eric B. Chandler
Community Health Center
6
Successes – A Quick Glance
• Get Fit! Coalition
– Get Fit with Mt. Zion
– New Jersey Partnership for Healthy Kids – New Brunswick
– Second Ward Community Block Club / CHEC – Healthy Harvest
Community Gardening Project
– Lincoln Annex’s Nutrition and Fitness Program
– Youth Services System – Healthy U
– Parent Nutrition Education Project
– Families on the Move – Club You Belong
– Rutgers University / Johnson & Johnson Fitness and Nutrition
Camp
– Albus Cavus Walking / Bike Path Project along the Raritan River
• Mental Health and Substance Abuse
– Mental Health Awareness, Wellness, and Prevention Workshop
– Praise God Not Drugs
Successes – A Quick Glance (continued)
• New Brunswick Domestic Violence Awareness Coalition
– Healthy Relationships Mural at the New Brunswick Hub Teen Center
– Annual March/ Rally Against Domestic Violence established
– ROSE (Regaining Ones Self Esteem Fund) assisted New Brunswick
women with reconstructive surgery
• New Brunswick Lead Coalition
– Get the Lead Out Project
– Safe Harvests Gardening Project
• Special Projects of the HNB Initiative
– New Brunswick Community Interpreter Project
– Caregivers Health Literacy Project
– Community Health Screenings
8
The Importance of Healthier New Brunswick
A Health Care Provider’s Perspective
 Access to health care is important but not sufficient for
many to obtain health
 The process has provided a space to convene, problem
solve and implement solutions to improve health and
health care.
 Allowed for sharing of agendas and collaboration.
 Has improved resources available to our patients.
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Leveraging and Connecting Resources
10
HEALTHIER NEW BRUNSWICK
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Reassessing Our Approach to
Strengthen Success
• Jeffrey Vega, President, New Brunswick Tomorrow
“Study the past if you would
define the future.”
– Confucius
13
After 14 Years of Success,
We Stepped Back to Assess!
 Victim of Our Own Success – Fragmentation
 The City, Johnson & Johnson, NBT and the Rutgers
RWJ Medical School convened regularly with
Moderator
 If Not Just Access To Healthcare, Then What Else?
14
What Does This Mean For The Community?
Amplify Our Thinking And Our Approach To
Produce Better Health Outcomes!
Some Existing Examples
1. Access to Health Care – Remains Very Important!
2. Social Determinants – Community Development in Esperanza
Neighborhood Project, Unity Square and Georges Road Gateway Project.
Community Food Alliance, Domestic Violence Awareness Coalition
3. Physical Environment – Complete Streets, Bike Lanes, New Brunswick
Ciclovia
4. Individual Behaviors – Access to RWJ Fitness Center & Nutrition
Classes
16
HEALTHIER NEW BRUNSWICK
“If everyone is moving forward
together, then success takes care
of itself.”
– Henry Ford
18
The Role of Corporate Philanthropy/
Social Responsibility
• Bonnie Petrauskas, Executive Director,
Corporate Contributions, Johnson & Johnson
What is Corporate Social Responsibility ?
“Corporate social responsibility is a commitment to
improve community well-being through discretionary
business practices and contributions of corporate
resources.”
—Philip Kotler & Nancy Lee “Corporate Social Responsibility,” Wiley 2007
•
•
•
•
Discretionary – not mandated by law
Is not focused on the bottom line
Goes beyond cash only
Community well-being includes human condition & environmental
issues
20
Recent Years Have Experienced a New Approach—
Closer Alignment with Corporate Objectives
• 1990s experienced a shift from allocating funds to as many
organizations as possible for the short term—to making longterm commitments to specific social issues and initiatives in
alignment with business goals
• Mid 2000 reflected a focus on a few strategic areas that fit
with corporate values
– Increase in in-kind contributions
– Shared distributions channels with partners
– Greater emphasis on evaluation
• Now, greater engagement with partner organizations; shared
responsibilities; fewer but more comprehensive initiatives
21
Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy -2014 Giving in Numbers
• Data from 261 of the world’s largest companies
• Giving grew for 64% of companies between 2010
and 2013
• 76% of companies are measuring and tracking the
societal outcomes and/or impacts of their
investments and started to use the data to inform
their program.
• Non-cash giving has increased in recent years
• Community & Economic Development are the
fastest growing program areas with total
contributions increasing 34% from 2010 to 2013
22
Grant Sizes Grow While Number of Recipients Per
Grantmaker Decline from 2010 to 2013
• The median number of
nonprofit partners per
corporate grant maker
declined each year from
2010 to 2013
Grant Sizes and Recipients Per Grantmaker (FTE)
• Grant sizes increased
each year as companies
focused societal
investment dollars on
strategic community
partners
Medians, inflation adjusted. N=38. Source: Stroik, Michael. Emerging Trends in Corporate Contributions. CECP Summit, 2014.
23
Education & Health are the Most Popular Program
Areas Supported by Corporations
Community &
Economic
Development
14%
Culture & Arts
5%
Other
15%
Education,
Higher
12%
Civic & Public
Affairs
5%
Total
Education:
28%
Environment
3%
Education, K-12
16%
Disaster Relief
3%
Health & Social
Services
27%
Average percentages.. N=181. Source: Stroik, Michael. Emerging Trends in Corporate Contributions. CECP Summit, 2014.
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Our Credo
We believe our first responsibility is to the doctors, nurses and patients, to mothers and fathers and all others who use our products and
services. In meeting their needs everything we do must be of high quality. We must constantly strive to reduce our costs in order to maintain
reasonable prices. Customers’ orders must be serviced promptly and accurately. Our suppliers and distributors must have an opportunity to
make a fair profit.
We are responsible to our employees, the men and women who work with us throughout the world. Everyone must be considered as an
individual. We must respect their dignity and recognize their merit. They must have a sense of security in their jobs. Compensation must be fair
and adequate, and working conditions clean, orderly and safe. We must be mindful of ways to help our employees fulfill their family
responsibilities. Employees must feel free to make suggestions and complaints. There must be equal opportunity for employment, development
and advancement for those qualified. We must provide competent management, and their actions must be just and ethical.
We are responsible to the communities
in which we live and work and to the
world community as well.
We are responsible to the communities in which we live and work and to the world community as well. We must be good citizens — support
good works and charities and bear our fair share of taxes. We must encourage civic improvements and better health and education. We must
maintain in good order the property we are privileged to use, protecting the environment and natural resources.
Our final responsibility is to our stockholders. Business must make a sound profit. We must experiment with new ideas. Research must be
carried on, innovative programs developed and mistakes paid for. New equipment must be purchased, new facilities provided and new products
launched. Reserves must be created to provide for adverse times. When we operate according to these principles, the stockholders should
realize a fair return.
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Johnson & Johnson
Corporate Contributions
• Community strategic intent is to
strengthen the health and vitality of
communities where our employees
live and work with a focus on
collaborative networks
• 3 Focus Area:
– Health & Wellness: Preventing Disease
– Academic Excellence: Preparing
Students for College & Career
– Addressing Community Livability
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Our Approach to Giving
•
Alignment with our strategic plan
•
Involvement of employees & management
–
Local & Regional Contributions / CSR Committees
–
Management Committee
–
Employee Volunteerism
•
Enduring partners that deliver communitybased solutions to health challenges
•
Beyond financial resources - strategic thought
partners
–
Business Acumen
–
Innovation
–
Metrics and Evaluation
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Benefit of a Partnership Approach
• Community partners are experts in their fields and in the needs of
their communities
• Have the greatest insights into….
– Needs of underserved populations
– Approaches that stand the greatest chances of success
• Partnerships combine the strengths of both public and private
sectors- leverage resources & multidisciplinary approaches
– Public sector brings reach into multiple parts of government and health care
delivery systems
– Private sector can contribute financial resources, business acumen, strategic
capabilities and a tolerance for risk essential in driving innovative solutions
• 26 Grant Partners in New Brunswick
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Together, we aim to
make life-changing,
long-term
differences in
human health that
contribute to the
health and vitality of
communities
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Keynote Speaker
Melita Jordan, CNM, MSN, APRN C
• Senior Executive Director, New Jersey Department of Health
• Adjunct Faculty, Drexel University School of Public Health,
Department of Community Health and Prevention
Panel Discussion
Healthier New Brunswick:
A Collective Impact Approach
•
Moderator: Jennifer Bradshaw,
Public Information Officer,
City of New Brunswick
Panel Discussion
Healthier New Brunswick:
A Collective Impact Approach
•
•
•
Framework for Collective Impact: Bonnie Petrauskas
Sharing Metrics for Evaluating Impact:
Maria Pellerano and Eric Jahn, MD
Connecting Community-Based Strategies:
Jaymie Santiago and Jeffrey Vega
Panel Discussion
Healthier New Brunswick:
A Collective Impact Approach
•
•
•
Framework for Collective Impact: Bonnie Petrauskas
Sharing Metrics for Evaluating Impact:
Maria Pellerano and Eric Jahn, MD
Connecting Community-Based Strategies:
Jaymie Santiago and Jeffrey Vega
Defining Collective Impact
Stanford Social Innovation Review introduced concept
in 2011 after looking at collaborative efforts that had
achieved substantial impact on large scale social issues
• Structured collaborative effort
• Process and results are emergent rather than predetermined
• Necessary resources and innovations often exist but have not
been recognized
• Learning is continuous
• Adoption happens simultaneously among many different
organizations
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Five Conditions of Collective Impact
Backbone Function
Common
Agenda
Mutual Reinforcing
Activities
Continuous
Communication
Shared Measurement
• An organization that serves as the key contact for the
initiative and coordinates organization and efforts
• Shared vision for change
• Joint approach to addressing priorities
• Activities, while differentiated, are coordinated through
a mutually reinforcing plan of action
• Consistent and open communication among many players
• Build trust, assure mutual objectives and create common
motivation
• Collecting data to ensure efforts remain aligned and
participants hold one another accountable
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Cascading Levels of Collaboration
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Community Assets Contribute to a
Collective View and Voice for HNB
• Builds on diverse partnerships that promote health
and wellness
• Creates awareness of community health improvement
efforts, priorities and available resources
• Minimize the duplication of efforts around community
health services
• Provides partners with a shared understanding of
how their individual efforts contribute to a broader
community goal
37
Panel Discussion
Healthier New Brunswick:
A Collective Impact Approach
•
•
•
Framework for Collective Impact: Bonnie Petrauskas
Sharing Metrics for Evaluating Impact:
Maria Pellerano and Eric Jahn, MD
Connecting Community-Based Strategies:
Jaymie Santiago and Jeffrey Vega
Sharing Metrics for Evaluating Impact
The Need to Develop
a Shared Data Measurement Set
• Provide an understanding and appreciation of the
total impact of community efforts
• Ensure that efforts remain aligned and participants
hold one another accountable
Sharing Metrics for Evaluating Impact
New Brunswick Specific Data
• New Brunswick has a demographic composition
different from Middlesex County making it difficult to
use Middlesex County figures
• New Brunswick more closely aligns with similarlysized urban areas in New Jersey
Sharing Metrics for Evaluating Impact
Moving Forward Together
• Develop core set of indicators designed to help
measure success of health and wellness efforts,
including:
– Health outcomes
– Social determinants of health
– Our collective impact work
• Helps tell the story moving forward
Panel Discussion
Healthier New Brunswick:
A Collective Impact Approach
•
•
•
Framework for Collective Impact: Bonnie Petrauskas
Sharing Metrics for Evaluating Impact:
Maria Pellerano and Eric Jahn, MD
Connecting Community-Based Strategies:
Jaymie Santiago and Jeffrey Vega
Connecting Community Based Strategies
Many of the strongest predictors of health and
well-being fall outside of the health care setting.
 Social, economic, and environmental factors all influence
health.
 When all sectors (e.g., housing, transportation, labor,
education) promote prevention-oriented environments,
they all contribute to health.
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Connecting Community Based Strategies
Healthier New Brunswick brings our work together
to improve the health and well-being of all
New Brunswick Residents.
 Partnerships are necessary. Partners play a variety of
roles and, at their best, are trusted members of the
communities and populations they serve.
 A wide range of actions contribute to and support healthy
communities.
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Connecting Community Based Strategies
Making the connection:
Two Key Forums:
 New Brunswick Tomorrow’s HEALTH TASK FORCE: Convenes
diverse partners and promotes strong cross-sector participation
in planning and implementing community health efforts.
 Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School’s ALLIANCE
FOR A HEALTHIER NEW BRUNSWICK: Convenes partners in
specialized areas of need (e.g. tobacco cessation, asthma, etc.)
to inform the community about the range of preventive services
they should receive and their benefits.
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New Brunswick Tomorrow Health and Youth Resource Guide
• Stay informed with access to a directory of services, health
and policy groups here in New Brunswick, wellness events
and community activities, and information specific to topics
like disease management, and enrollment to youth services.
Connecting Community Based Strategies
Other connections:
 THE NEW BRUNSWICK COMMUNITY FOOD ALLIANCE:
nurtures the development and maintenance of a sustainable,
localized food system and food-secure city of New Brunswick in
which all of its residents are hunger-free, healthy and benefit
economically from the food systems that impacts their lives.
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Q&A
Campaign Unveiled
• Jim Cahill,
Mayor, City of New Brunswick
Introducing
Campaign Tool Kit: Resource Tools
for a Healthier New Brunswick
• Jaymie Santiago,
Director of Program Operations, New Brunswick Tomorrow
Tool Kit Elements
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Branding Guidelines
“About the Campaign” Brief
“To Do” List
Health Task Force and Alliance Meeting Dates
Community Poster
To Come: Health and Youth Resource Guide
and Mobile App
Luncheon
In Action!

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