The Arctic Tundra - Mercer Island School District

Report
The
Arctic
Tundra
By Lindsay
Adams, Josh
Peck, Beau
Hibbert
Period 7
ARE YOU READY?
Location
Features
of
the
Arctic
Tundra
• Frost-molded landscapes
• No “true soil” because of the frigid
temperatures and permafrost
• Permafrost is a frozen soil, which is only found in
areas with the average annual temperature is
below around 23°F.
Climate
• Bleak and treeless. It is cold through all months of the year. It never
gets any warmer than 45 or 50° F.
• Very windy with blizzards occurring every other day, during the
winters.
• There is hardly any moisture in the tundra atmosphere and annual
precipitation is never more than 10 centimeters on an average.
• The slight warmth of the summer may melt the surface ice to
expose slimy soil for the brief summer period.
Seasonal Info
• In the arctic tundra there are two seasons: winter and summer
• is a brief period of milder climates when the sun shines almost 24 hours a
day. It has been called "the land of the midnight sun". It lasts only 6 to 10
weeks.
• During the long winter months the sun barely rises and it is dark for most
of the day. Temperatures can go as low as -50 °C during winters, though on
an average, it stays somewhere between -25 °C to -30 °C.
• The highest recorded temperature during the fleeting summers have
never gone beyond 15 °C and tend to hover between 3 °C and 13 °C on an
average.
Things that are unique
• There are several weeks where the sun never
rises. This causes the temperatures to drop to
extremely cold levels.
• The average temperature of the tundra is
around -28°C while extremes can dip to -70°C.
Plants and Animals
• Plant characteristics:
Shallow root system because the permafrost
Small plants (only centimeters tall) living close together, close
to the ground.
Example:
Bearberry-low growing leathery leaves and silky hairs provide
protection from the cold and wind
• Animal Characteristics:
Furry coats, rich deposits of fat, burrow underground for the
cold. Small ears and bodies for minimum exposure. Broad feet
to walk in the snow.
• Animal Example:
Arctic Fox-short ears, short round body with a thick coat to
minimize exposed skin to cold
Activities
• Hiking and backpacking
• Wildlife viewing
• Kayaking and canoeing
Environmental Issues
• Mining and oil drilling are destroying animals
habitat.
• Global warming is melting ice, which is hurting
the delicate balance of the Tundra’s
ecosystem.
Refrences
• http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/exhibits/biom
es/tundra.php
• https://php.radford.edu/~swoodwar/biomes/
?page_id=89
• http://www.cotf.edu/ete/modules/msese/ear
thsysflr/tundra.html

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