Train Plan Training

Report
RAILWAY INDUSTRY
TRAIN PLANNING
LEVEL 2 TRAINING
Module 2 - Who, What Why?
Train Planning
Five things to think about
Do WE know WHAT we do ?
Do WE understand WHY we do it ?
Do WE know WHO we do it for ?
Do our CUSTOMERS know WHAT we do ?
Do our CUSTOMERS understand WHY we do it ?
Putting the Railway into perspective
Vital statistics -
• 20,000 miles of track
• 34,000 train movements per day
– 92% passenger 8% freight
• 2,500 stations
• Currently 20 (Franchised), 9 (Open Access) TOCs, and 5
principal FOCs
Network Rail
• Manages development and delivery of the timetabling process
• Maintains and renews the network
• Manages signalling
• Prohibited from being a train operator
Train Operating Companies
• Currently 20 franchised passenger operators
• 9 “Open Access” operators not operating under
“franchise” conditions
• That is without any Tax-payer support
• All services shown in the National Rail Timetable
(last ‘officially’ printed edition May 2007, now free
on Network Rail web site).
• Generic term includes 5 principal Freight
Operators
Train Operating Companies
• Three broad categories of train services
• Long distance ‘Inter City’
• Regional
• Commuter and suburban
(Some TOCs cover all categories)
• Lease Rolling Stock from ROSCOs
• Operate over Network Rail infrastructure
What is NR Operational Planning ?
• The activity concerned with planning and
documenting the allocation of network capacity
to all Railway Undertakings.
• Specifically within Network Rail it is the
department dealing with
– Timetable Planning
• Track Access
– Engineering Planning
• Engineering Access
Operational Planning
• Works to processes set down in legislation
and overseen by the ORR, DfT, etc
• Impacts on Network Rail’s revenue stream
–225,000 train paths every week
–Selling un-used or ‘white space’, is a key activity
• Has a major impact on TOCs income and
costs
• Plans access to the infrastructure for
maintenance and renewal of the network
Network Rail Planning Inputs
• Network Code – Part D
• Track Access Agreements
• Geographic/diagrammatic maps of the network e.g. Sectional
Appendix
• Requests for Access
• (Bids)
• Maintenance and renewal strategies
• i.e what we need to do the job
Network Rail Planning Outputs
• Responses to access requests
• Published Train Service Schedules (TSDB)
• Working Timetables (WTT)
• Public Timetables (NRT)
• Weekly/Daily Amended Train Notices (WATN/DATN)
• Weekly Operating Notice (WON)
• i.e what we produce
Network Rail Planning ‘Tools’
• Rules of the Route
• Rules of the Plan
• TrainPlan/ITPS
• Bplan
• Capacity Management system - Railsys
• Possession Planning System - PPS
• i.e what we use to produce a plan
TOCs
• Inputs
• Network Code
• Access Agreements
• Franchise requirements (SLCs/PSRs)
• Outputs
• Timetable specification
• Supporting pocket timetables, etc
• Meeting customers’ needs
• Tools
• Rules of the Route/Plan
• Voyagerplan/TrainPlan
• Bplan
• Therefore very much the same …………………….
W here does Operational Planning sit
within N etwork Rail?
Ops & Customer Services
Other Train
Planning
Centres
Major Projects
& Investment
Operational Planning
PCAT
Train
Planning
Centre
OPSU
Route Directors
General
Managers
NAU
Customer
Relations
Executives
Engineering
National
Delivery
Service
Territory
Maintenance
Directors
TPC Organisation
Train Planning Centre Manager
Capacity Allocation
Manager
Network Trains
Manager
Informed Traveller
Manager
Schedule Integrity
Manager
SNFC (Leeds only)
Sample TOC Organisation Chart
Head of Planning &
Access
Timetable
Production
Manager
Amended
Access
Manager
Timetable
Planning
Manager
Timetable
Production
Assistant
Timetable
Planning
Assistant
Timing
Managers
(STP)
Planning
Assistants
(STP)
Service
Planning
Assistant
Module 2 Syndicate Questions
Q1.
With which external bodies/customers does
NR Operational Planning work and in what
way ?
Q2.
Who are the customers of a Train Operator’s train
plans ?
Q3. (a) Why is pleasing the customer so important
(b) What does a customer want from a supplier ?

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