Chapter 5

Report
Chapter 5
Motivation and Emotion:
Driving Consumer Behavior
BABIN / HARRIS
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
Learning Outcomes
LO1
Understand what initiates human behavior.
LO2
Classify basic consumer motivations.
LO3
Describe consumer emotions and demonstrate how they
help shape value.
LO4
Apply different approaches to measuring consumer
emotions.
LO5
Appreciate the fact that not all consumers express
emotions in the same way.
LO6
Define the concept of schema-based affect.
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
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LO1
Understand what initiates human
behavior.
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
LO1
Motivations
• The inner reasons or driving forces
behind human action as consumers are
driven to address real needs.
• Human motivations are oriented toward
two key groups of behavior:
– Homeostasis – the body naturally reacts in a
way so as to maintain a constant, normal
blood stream.
– Self-improvement – changing one’s current
state to a level that is more ideal.
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
5-4
LO2
Classify basic consumer
motivations.
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
Exhibit 5.1: An Illustration of
LO2 Consumer Motivations According to
Maslow’s Hierarchy
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Exhibit 5.2: Utilitarian and Hedonic
LO2 Motivations Lead to Consumer
Behaviors
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LO2
Consumer Involvement
Represents the
degree of personal
relevance a
consumer finds in
pursuing value
from a given
consumption act.
Types:
–
–
–
–
–
Product
Shopping
Situational
Enduring
Emotional
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LO2
Exhibit 5.3: Typical High and Low
Product Involvement
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Involvement
Is this high involvement or irrational
behavior?
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LO3
Describe consumer emotions
and demonstrate how they help
shape value.
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
LO3
Emotions
• Psychobiological reactions to
appraisals.
– Psychobiological because they
involve psychological processing and
physical responses.
– Create visceral responses – certain
feeling states are tied to behavior in a
very direct way.
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
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LO3
Exhibit 5.4: Visceral Responses to
Emotions by Consumers
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LO3
Krispy Kreme Creates Visceral
Responses To Emotions
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LO3
Cognitive Appraisal Theory
• Describes how specific types of
thoughts can serve as a basis for
specific emotions.
• Cognitive appraisals:
– Anticipation
– Agency
– Equity
– Outcomes
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
5-15
LO3
Emotion Terminology
• Mood – a transient (temporary and
changing) and general affective
state.
– Mood-congruent judgments – the
value of a target is influenced in a
consistent way by one’s mood.
• Affect – represents the feelings a
consumer has about a particular
product or activity.
.
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning
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LO3 Exhibit 5.5: Bad-Mood Consumers
Seek Out Employees With Bad Moods
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LO4
Apply different approaches to
measuring consumer emotions.
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
LO4
Measuring Emotion
Autonomic measures
Self-report measures
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Don’t Worry Be Happy! Know
How to Keep the Score
Anderson Windows
knows affecting
consumer emotions
is a key competitive
advantage.
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
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Mood
Saying “no” will ruin her mood!
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LO4
Exhibit 5.6: A Short-Form PANAS
Application
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LO5
Appreciate the fact that not all
consumers express emotions in
the same way.
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
Emotions
What is this consumer feeling?
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
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LO5 Differences in Emotional Behavior
Emotional
involvement
Emotional
expressiveness
Emotional
intelligence
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LO5
Exhibit 5.7: Emotional Intelligence
Consists of Many Elements
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LO6
Define the concept of schemabased affect.
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
LO6
Exhibit 5.8: Illustration of Emotion
Aiding Learning
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Nostalgia
Going retro - Nostalgia creates
positive feelings.
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To Know It Really Is To Feel It!
Translating words
into another
language does not
always translate
emotions.
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
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LO6
Schema-Based Affect
Emotions become stored as
part of the meaning for a
category.
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
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LO6
Exhibit 5.9: A Typical Car
Salesperson Schema
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LO6
Exhibit 5.10: Examples of
Schema-Based Affect
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LO6
Emotional Contagion
• Represents the extent to which an
emotional display by one person
influences the emotional state of a
bystander.
• Emotional labor – workers have to
overtly manage their own emotional
displays as part of the requirements
of the job.
© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.
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