BRANDING NOVA SCOTIA*S EMERGING WINE REGION

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Girlonwine.com
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CANADIAN WINE REGIONS
CANADIAN WINE INDUSTRY
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Young industry
Search for identity
Experimenting with which grapes grow best
Ontario and BC have so far gained the most
recognition
WINE INDUSTRY BY CANADIAN PROVINCE
Full Economic Impact in CAD (2011)
$3,338,197
3,500,000
3,000,000
2,500,000
2,000,000
1,500,000
1,000,000
500,000
0
$2,011,060
$804,685
$196,286
Ontario
British
Columbia
Quebec
Nova Scotia
1 CAD = approx. 1 USD
GROWTH IN CANADIAN WINE INDUSTRY
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Between 2007 and 2011, wine consumption in Canada increased by
over 14%.
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The number of wineries in Canada went from 374 in 2005 to 476 in
2011.
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The total impact of wine related tourism in Canada in 2011 was $1.2
billion.
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The number of wine-related tourists in 2011 was estimated at 3 million.
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Wine tourism generated an estimated $475.9 million in 2011.
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Selling an average bottle of Canadian wine generates about $21.36 in
business revenue, $3.99 of tax revenue, and $5.41 in wages.
NOVA SCOTIA WINE INDUSTRY
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History can be traced back to the 1611, which is when
earliest vines are believed to have been planted by
settlers
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Very young industry that has only really developed since
the 1980s
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Winery Association of Nova Scotia founded in 2002
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Nova Scotia Wine Standards adopted in 2005
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Wines of Nova Scotia logo signifies a quality wine made
of 100% Nova Scotia grapes that meets the NSWS
standards
NOVA SCOTIA WINE INDUSTRY
In 1980, there was only one Nova Scotia winery. Today
there are 13 grape wineries and 6 fruit wineries
operating commercially.
• Over 22 grape growers in 2011
• More than 518 acres under vines
• 1,264 tonnes of grapes produced in 2011
• Seven regions across the province
NOVA SCOTIA’S WINE REGIONS
NOVA SCOTIA GEOGRAPHY
• Varied geography: rolling hills, rivers, and cliffs
• Geography and climate has been compared to
Scotland
• Mainland peninsula + Cape Breton island
• Surrounded by water
• Most of the wineries located in the Annapolis Valley
• Bay of Fundy also a popular tourist destination, which
can tie in with wine tourism
NOVA SCOTIA’S CLIMATE
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Cool climate (at the limit for vines)
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Coastal breezes from the ocean and moderating influence from the Bay of Fundy
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Many vineyards in valley, which has warmer temperatures, lower precipitation,
and the longest growing season
NOVA SCOTIA WINE COUNTRY
NOVA SCOTIA WINE COUNTRY
NOVA SCOTIA WINE
• Excels when it comes to sparkling wines and aromatic
whites
• Cool climate leads to high acidity grapes
• Hardy grapes work best
• Hybrid grapes developed to resist cold weather have
seen the most success
THE MAIN GRAPES
WHITE:
L’Acadie Blanc
Seyval
Vidal Blanc
New York
Muscat
• Chardonnay
• Riesling
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RED:
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Maréchal Foch
Leon Millot
Lucie Kuhlmann
Baco Noir
Pinot Noir
L’ACADIE BLANC:
NOVA SCOTIA’S SIGNATURE GRAPE
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Hardy white wine variety resistant to cool temperatures
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Medium vigor and productivity; good disease resistance
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White wine that can be rich and full, characteristics of
crisp apple and citrus
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Sometime sees oak fermentation and/or maturation
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Hybrid made in 1953 by Ollie A Bradt at the Vineland
Research Centre
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Jancis Robinson’s Wine Grapes: “An extremely complex
Vitis riparia, Vitis labrusca, Vitis vinifera, Vitis aestivalis,
Vitis lincecumii, Vitis rupestris, Vitis cinerea and Vitis
berlandieri hybrid.”
THE BRANDING PROBLEM
Unknown Grape Varieties  Tidal Bay Brand
TIDAL BAY
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Committee of local winemakers collaborated to create a set of standards
for a style-based appellation
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Discussions began in 2009
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An Ontario winemaker, Peter Gamble, was brought on board as a
consultant
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The first wines that conformed to the guidelines were released in 2011
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The appellation was officially launched in June 2012
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The appellation is recognized by the Winery Association of Nova Scotia,
but is not entrenched in law quite yet
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Set to be made law in 2013
THE TIDAL BAY WINERIES
• Annapolis
Highland
• Avondale Sky
• Benjamin
Bridge
• Blomidon
Estate Winery
• Domaine de
Grand Pré
• Gaspereau
Vineyards
• Jost Vineyards
• Luckett
Vineyards
• Petite Rivière
Vineyards
• Sainte-Famille
Wines
TIDAL BAY WINE PROFILE
“Nova Scotia in a glass”
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Made entirely from Nova Scotia grapes
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Blend of white grapes – the blend varies per
producer but can include l’Acadie Blanc,
Ortega, Seyval Blanc, Vidal, Geisenheim
Riesling, and New York Muscat
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Fruit forward style but with crisp acidity
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Relatively low in alcohol (around 9 - 11%)
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Approved by an independent tasting
committee
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Designed to be paired with local seafood
TIDAL BAY WINE PROFILE
“Stylistically, Tidal Bay is a fresh,
crisp, off-dry, still, white wine with a
bright, signature Nova Scotia
aromatic component. The wines
show vibrant, expressive fruit on the
nose, along with a brisk minerality
and a refreshingly crisp palate.”
WHAT THEY ARE SAYING
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Representative of the best style of wine that
can be made in Nova Scotia (promote what
you do best)
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Provides a common branding and
marketing
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Brand allowed the participating wineries to
collectively gain more exposure than they
could have individually
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Positive reaction from consumers
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Customers without a lot of wine knowledge
or knowledge of particular grapes are able
to ask for Tidal Bay
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Industry and tourism in general is growing
NOVA SCOTIA: ROOM TO GROW
A recent Winery Association of Nova Scotia study found that:
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The Nova Scotia wine and grape industry contributed $140 million to the Nova
Scotia economy in 2011, including tax revenues of $25.4 million and wages of
over $30 million.
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The industry supports 854 full-time jobs.
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The total economic impact is estimated at $196.3 million for the Nova Scotia
economy in 2011.
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Nova Scotia wineries generated 650,000 9L equivalent case sales in 2011.
NOVA SCOTIA: ROOM TO GROW
• 100,000 tourists visited Nova Scotia wineries in 2011.
• The tonnes of grapes produced in Nova Scotia has
risen dramatically, from next to nothing in 1992 to
more than 1200 tonnes in 2011.
• The Winery Association of Nova Scotia claims that a
bottle of Nova Scotia wine produces 15 times the
economic impact that a bottle of imported wine does.
NOVA SCOTIA: ROOM TO GROW
Based on figures from the, the Winery Association of Nova Scotia recently launched a
“Room to Grow” campaign.
They claim that Nova Scotia wine is “first class industry”, because it is:
• Growing
• Bucking the trend of industry globalization
• Rooted in place
• A catalyst for other local industries (i.e. tourism)
• A high visibility, prestige industry
• Environmentally responsible and sustainable
LOOKING TOWARD THE FUTURE
• Winemakers producing Tidal Bay can’t currently keep
up with the demand
• All the grapes in the province are used
• Wineries are continually increasing production
• Wineries are seeing more and more visitors each year
• Scott Brison, a politician (Liberal MP) in the area,
recently launched a campaign suggesting that Nova
Scotia should recruit wine expertise from Spain,
Portugal, and Italy
QUESTIONS?

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