Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS)

Report
Positive
Behavioral
Interventions
and Supports
(PBIS)
November 3, 2013
Sandy DeMuth
Georgia Department of Education
NAEHCY Conference
Learning Objectives
• Define key features of PBIS
• Describe how schools in GA
implement PBIS
• Identify where PBIS is being
implemented in GA
• Locate resources to learn
more about PBIS
Positive Behavioral
Interventions &
Supports (PBIS)
Building a Positive
School Climate
"You can design and create, and build the most
wonderful place in the world. But it takes people to
make the dream a reality."
Walt Disney
Build Effective
Environments
•Positive behavior is more
effective than problem
behavior
•Preventative, teaching, and
reinforcement-based
strategies to achieve
meaningful behavior changes
•Effective interventions for
problem behavior
Starting point…
• Educators cannot “make” students learn or behave
• Educators can create environments to increase the
likelihood students learn and behave
• Environments that increase that likelihood are
guided by a core curriculum and implemented with
consistency and fluency
PBIS is…
• A problem solving framework
• Culturally contextualized
• Creation of a continuum of environmental
evidence-based supports based on
student needs
PBIS is not...
• Not a specific practice, package or curriculum
• Not limited to any particular group of
students
Designing School-Wide Systems for Student Success
Academic Systems
Behavioral Systems
Intensive, Individual Interventions
•Individual Students
•Assessment-based
•High Intensity
1-5%
Targeted Group Interventions
•Some students (at-risk)
•High efficiency
•Rapid response
Universal Interventions
•All students
•Preventive, proactive
5-10%
80-90%
Intensive, Individual Interventions
•Individual Students
•Assessment-based
•Intense, durable procedures
1-5%
5-10%
Targeted Group Interventions
•Some students (at-risk)
•High efficiency
•Rapid response
80-90%
Universal Interventions
•All settings, all students
•Preventive, proactive
Intensive
Math
Continuum of Support
for ALL
Science
Targeted
Spanish
Reading
Universal
Soc Studies
Soc skills
Basketball
Label behavior…not
people
Dec 7, 2007
10
An Essential Shift in Thinking
The central question is not:
“What about the student is causing the performance
discrepancy?”
But
“What about the interaction of the curriculum, instruction,
learners and learning environment should be altered so that
the students will learn?”
11
Essential Features at the School Level
• Teams of educators
within the school
(administrator)
• Data-based decision
making
• Instructional Focus
– Teach & Practice
• Acknowledge student
mastery of social skills
– Positive Feedback
How Do Schools Typically
Respond to Problem Behavior?
• Reactive/Consequence Strategies
• Office referral, detention, suspensions, etc.
• Consequences will not teach the “right way”
• Consequences may actually reinforce the behavior of
concern
• Restrictive and segregated settings
• Individual counseling and therapy
• Implement packaged programs
Traditional Discipline versus PBIS
Traditional Discipline
PBIS
• Goal is to stop undesirable behavior
• Goal is to stop undesirable behavior
through the use of punishment
• Focuses on the student’s problem
behavior
by:
o Replacing with a new behavior or
skill
o Altering environments
o Teaching appropriate skills
o Acknowledge appropriate behavior
more frequently
The Critical Elements
of School-Wide PBIS
PBIS
1. The PBIS Team-Principal
2. Clear Expectations & Rules
3. Teaching Behavior
4. Data Entry and Analysis
5. Recognition (Feedback)
6. Effective Discipline Process
7. Faculty Commitment
8. Implementation
9. Classroom
10.Evaluation
A brief review of some of the critical elements of PBIS that are addressed in a 3-day school training. Not all elements are addressed in this presentation.
15
School-wide Expectations
“Core values are timeless
and do not change, while
practices and strategies
should be changing all the
time.”
Jim Collins
16
Core Values
•
•
•
•
•
•
Excellent customer service
Taking care of our people
Giving back
Doing the "right" thing
Respect for all people
Entrepreneurial spirit
Establishing Core Values is Best Practice in the Business Community
17
PBIS
Developing Expectations
1. Identify core values and
expectations for all
students/staff in all settings
2. Select 3 to 5
3. State in positive terms
More than just writing slogans on the walls…
Grace Snell Middle-Gwinnett County
19
Cowan Road Middle: Griffin-Spalding County
Clear, concise
rules reduce
mixed
messages
22
Rules
• Examples of expected behavior – what to
do, NOT - what not to do!
• Specific and observable
• Positively stated
• 3-5 for each expectation
• Rules must be enforceable and worth
acknowledging!
Mixed message?
Teacher Observed Wearing
Flip Flops at school
It is not enough to just post the words on the walls of
the school or just publish in agendas…….
25
Why teach behavior?
• For a child to learn something new, it needs to be
repeated an average of 8 times.
• For a child to unlearn an old behavior and replace
with a new behavior, the new behavior must be
repeated an average of 28 times
(Harry Wong)
27
Rationale: 6,551 tardies are impacting instruction. Many or few? Many
Expectation to be addressed: Be Prepared
Rule not followed by many: Students must be in seat before tardy bell.
Lesson: AP will have someone film him crawling from one class to another with a
backpack, stopping at his locker and still making it to his seat under 5 minutes. Film
will be shown in homerooms and reinforced with group acknowledgement.
5 minutes to
get to class
**Many of the high schools we train report over 10,000 documented tardies.
Mary Persons High School-Monroe County
7000
6000
5000
4000
201112
201213
3000
2000
1000
0
All Tardies
Acknowledging Appropriate Behavior
• Tied to specific behaviors
• Delivered soon after the behavior
• Age appropriate (actually valued
by student)
• Delivered frequently
• Gradually faded away
32
“What the Worlds Greatest Managers Do Differently”
(Buckingham & Coffman 2002, Gallup)
1. Know what is expected
2. Have the materials and
equipment to do the job
correctly
3. Receive recognition each
week for good work.
4. Have a supervisor who
cares, and pays attention
5. Receive encouragement to
contribute and improve
6. Can identify a person at work
who is a “best friend”
7. Feel the mission of the
organization makes them feel
like their jobs are important
8. See the people around them
committed to doing a good job
9. Feel like they are learning new
things (getting better)
10. Have the opportunity to do
their job well.
33
A Review of the
10 Critical
Elements of
School-wide
PBIS
Anything less is
experimentation!
1.The PBIS Team-Principal
2.Clear Expectations & Rules
3.Teaching Behavior
4.Recognition (Feedback)
5.Data Entry and Analysis
6.Effective Discipline Process
7.Faculty Commitment
8.Implementation
9.Classroom
10.Evaluation
Intensive
Math
Continuum of Support
for ALL
Science
Targeted
Spanish
Reading
Universal
Soc Studies
Soc skills
Basketball
Label behavior…not
people
Dec 7, 2007
35
Tier II – Small Group
• At-risk students
• Screen
• Data decision rules
• Informal assessment process to match intervention to student need
• Small group Social Skill instruction
• Self-management
• Academic Support
• Part of a continuum – must link to universal school-wide PBIS
system
Tiers III & IV - Individualized Supports
• When small group is not sufficient
• When problem is intense and chronic
• Driven by Functional Behavioral Assessment
• Connections to Mental Health and Community Agencies
• Part of a continuum – must link to universal school-wide
PBIS system
Over 18,000 schools in the
U.S. implementing PBIS.
Since 2008, 29% of
Georgia’s Districts have
been trained and more
than 200 implementing.
DJJ schools and GNETS
I can . . .
• Define key features of PBIS.
• Describe how schools in GA implement PBIS.
• Identify where PBIS is being implemented in GA.
• Locate resources to learn more about PBIS.
Ginny O’Connell-State Coordinator of PBIS
Sandy DeMuth - PBIS Specialist
[email protected]

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