African Drumming

Report
African
Drumming
Djembe
 A type of hand drum from West
Africa.
 The word Djembe comes from the
saying “everyone gather
together.”
 The drum is used for all kinds of
celebrations and events that bring
people together.
Djembe
 The shell of the drum is shaped like a goblet and
made of wood.
 The drumhead is traditionally made from goatskin
that is attached to the shell with metal rings and
rope.
Djun-Djuns
 West African bass drum played
alongside the Djembe.
 They are played with sticks and have a
powerful low pitched sound.
Djun-Djuns
 The shell of the djun-djun is made from wood and
shaped like a cylinder.
 Djun-djuns have two skins-one on top and one on
bottom. They are made out of cow hide.
Balafon
 Type of xylophone played with mallets from
West Africa.
 The balafon is made of slates of hardwood
cut into different sizes.
 The different sizes of slates create different
pitches
Balafon
 The pieces of wood are tied to a frame made of
wood or bamboo.
 Dried gourds are attached underneath to increase
volume, sound quality, and resonance.
N’Daaga
 N’Daaga is a rhythm
from Senegal.
 It’s mainly played by
the Wolof people in
Senegal’s capital city,
Dakar.
N’Daaga
 This is one of the first rhythms that many
Senegalese children learn to dance to.
 The N’Daaga is played in 3/4 time with a
“waltz” feel.
N’Daaga
Stick Drums:
N’-Daa-ga N’-Daa-ga N’-Daa-ga Let’s all play the
Low Xylophones:
N’-Daa-ga N’-Daa-ga N’-Daa-ga Let’s all play the
C G
G C G
G C
G
G C C C C
Hand drums:
Se-ne-gal drum Se-ne-gal drum
High xylophones:
Se-ne-gal drum Se-ne-gal drum
G
Other percussion:
G
G
C G G
G
C
Play N’-Daa-ga from Se-ne-gal N’-Daa-ga
Lamba
 Lamba is the song of the djeli.
 The song showcases the rhythms and
melodies of the djeli music from Guinea.
 Djelis are the traditional musicians and
history keepers of West Africa. Many can
recite long histories from memory.
 Dejelis inherit their musical status through
their families.
Lamba
Lamba
 Lamba started as a tune on the balafon.
Later, drums and other instruments were
added to the music
 Lamba has become a popular song
performed by the djelis for every occasion.
 In the song, the djelis give thanks for the gift
of music.
 The swing feel in Lamba is similar to the
swing feel found in jazz music.
Lamba
Stick Drums:
Play Lam-ba Yea, Play Lam-ba Yeah, Play Lam-ba this way on the drums yeah
Low xylophones:
Play Lam-ba Yea, Play Lam-ba Yeah, Play Lam-ba this way on the drums yeah
C C
C D C
C
C E
C
C C D C C C
C
E
Hand drums:
High xylophone:
Play the Lam-ba now Let’s all play the Lam-ba now Let’s all
Let’s play Lam-ba right now
C
Other xylophones:
C
C
C
D
C
Let’s play Lam-ba right now
C
C
C
C
D
C
It is the song of the Dje-li
It is the song of the Dje-li
EG G
E G G E E A
E
E A
A E
A E
Macrou
 The Macrou is a rhythm traditionally from the Susu
ethnic group.

The
Susu
are
.
located in
the western
coastal
region of
Guinea
which is
where the
rhythm
comes from.
Macrou
 The Macrou is a rhythm and dance that is most often
times played at the time of a full moon.
 Young people from different villages gather and
participate in the social event.
 The Macrou is usually played with the Yankadi at the
same ceremony.
 Often referred to as a “dance of seduction,” the
Macrou is more of social gathering where people get to
know each other.
Macrou
 The ceremony typically begins with the Yankadi which
is has a slow swing feel. Dancers move in slow
sweeping movements while singers face each other.
 The call of a whistle indicates the change to the
Macrou.
 The Macrou changes to a fun, up-tempo pattern.
 The dance moves are high energy with interactive
group dancing that allows people to make new
friends!
Macrou
Stick Drums:
Mac-rou beat
Low xylophones:
Hand drums:
play it now!
Mac-rou beat play it now!
beat
play the beat
play the
F
F
F
G
F
G
Su-su peo-ple from Gui-nea play this!
High xylophones:
Call it the Mac-rou
A C
Other xylophone:
Call it the Mac-rou
F A D
A
Play the beat now play it
F
C
F
C
G
D
C
F
A
D
Play the beat now play it
F
C
F
C
G
D
Didadi
 Didadi is a song, rhythm, and dance from
the Wassoulou region of Mali.
Didadi
 Didadi is played to accompany Wassoulou music
and for many other occasions like weddings,
holidays, and welcoming guests.
 Traditionally Didadi is performed by young people
at harvest festivals in Mali.
 Drummers play the Didadi rhythm on drums, and
dancers compete to win the title “Best Didadi
Dancer” at the Didadi games!
 The xylophone part is the vocal part that is typically
sung with the drum pattern.
Didadi
Stick Drums: Now let’s play Di-da-di on the drums
Low xylophones: Now let’s play Di-da-di on the drums
E
G
G
G G G E
A
A
Hand drums: Play the beat Play the Di-da-di Yeah!
High xylophones:
Here is the Di-da-di
G
C E
G
G E
from the coun-try Ma-li
G
C
E
A A E
Takamba
 Takamba is a style of rhythm
and dance performed by the
Tuareg and Sanghai people of
Niger and Mali.
Takamba
 The word Takamba comes from an abbreviated
version of the Songhai phrase “Ganu mate kan ni ga
ba.” Which translates to “Dance the way you like to
dance.”
 Takamba features a graceful dance performed by
men and women, seated or standing.
 The dance is characterized by slow, wave-like
movements of the shoulders and arms from right to
left. As the mover their arms, the dancers roll their
eyes in a sweet, playful way.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=npPnpINBrps start at 2:35
Takamba
Stick Drums:
Now let’s play ta-kam-ba like this
Play Ta-kam-ba
Low xylophones:
Now let’s play ta-kam-ba like this Play Ta-kam-ba
G
G
G
D D D
G
Hand drums: Play Ta-kam-ba
High xylophones:
G
B
B
A
Play Ta-kam-ba
Lis-ten to the Ta-kam-ba
G
F D F G
D
A
D
It is played on the drum the Ta-kam-ba is so fun
Miyaabele
 Miyaabele is from Senegal
Miyaabele
 Miyaabele is a Fulani folk song.
 Fulanis are an ethnic group found throughout West
Africa. Fulanis are traditionally nomadic herders.
 The Miyaabele is performed in 3/4 time which makes
it feel like a beautiful African waltz!
Miyaabele
Low Drums with sticks: Mi-yaa-bele
Low Xylophones:
Mi-yaa-bele Mi-yaa-bele Let’s all play the
Mi-yaa-bele
Mi-yaa-bele
C
C
E
G
E
G
Hand drums:
Is Fun to play
Is fun to play
High xylophones:
Is Fun to play
Is fun to play
E
E
Other xylophone:
G C E
G
C E
Let’s play the mi-yaa-be-le
G
E
C C
C
E G
Yankadi
 The Yankadi is a rhythm traditionally from the Susu
ethnic group.

The
Susu
are
.
located in
the western
coastal
region of
Guinea
which is
where the
rhythm
comes from.
Yankadi
 The Yankadi is a rhythm and dance that is most often
played at the time of a full moon.
 Young people from different villages gather and
participate in the social event.
 The Macrou is usually played with the Yankadi at the
same ceremony.
 Often referred to as a “dance of seduction,” the
Yankadi is more of social gathering where people get to
know each other.
Yankadi
 The ceremony typically begins with the Yankadi which
is has a slow swing feel. Dancers move in slow
sweeping movements while singers face each other.
 The call of a whistle indicates the change to the
Macrou.
 The Macrou changes to a fun, up-tempo pattern.
 The dance moves are high energy with interactive
group dancing that allows people to make new
friends!
Yankadi
Low Drums with sticks:
Gui-nea
Low Xylophones:
Called Yan-ka-di
E
Gui-nea
Gui-nea
Called Yan-ka-di
G E A
E
G E
Hand drums:
play the beat from the Susu
High xylophones:
play the beat from the Su
su
E
A
Other xylophone:
C
G
C
E
D
From Gui-nea
From Gui-nea
C
C
E
G
E
G
A
Makossa
 Makossa is a celebration rhythm played in Burkina
Faso.
Makossa
 Makossa’s purpose is to make people dance and
have fun!
 The xylophone part comes from a song about a
dancer named Aisha. The song goes like this:
Oh Wey, Oh Wey!
Come to our place,
Aisha!
She really knows how to dance
Aisha!
Makossa
Stick Drums:
This song is Ma-kos-sa
It comes from Af-ri-ca
This song is Ma-kos-sa It comes from Af-ri-ca
Low Xylophones:
D
F
G
D
D
A
F
F G
Play the beat we call Ma-kos-sa
Hand drums:
High xylophones:
D A F
Play the Song Ma-kos-sa Bur-kin-a fa-so YEA
D
D
D
A
G
F D
D D C E C

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