Slide 1

Report
City of Seattle
CDBG Program
Presented to the
National Community Development Association
June 24, 2010
Distribution of CDBG Funds
(millions of $)
Admin &
Planning, $1.3
Housing, $2.8
Economic
Development,
$5.4
Human Services,
$5.0
Presenters
• Judy Summerfield
– Manager, Survival Services, Human Services Department
• Debbie Thiele
– Multi-Family Lending Manager, Office of Housing
• Stephen H. Johnson
– Interim Director, Office of Economic Development
Seattle Department of Human Services & Seattle Office of Housing
Ending & Preventing Homelessness
2009 Housing Development & Supportive Services Investments
60
Local Housing Development
Local Services Funding
50
Other Federal Housing
Other Federal Services Funding
54%
CDBG Housing
40
CDBG Services Funding
30
20
34%
56%
55%
10
-
42%
41%
17%
Prevention
Local Funding
Other Federal
CDBG
Total
29%
39%
15%
18%
6%
Intervention
Permanent Housing
Prevention
$1,932,545
$1,868,947
$791,218
Intervention
$14,217,397
$7,411,956
$3,705,025
Permanent
Housing
$12,358,815
$8,917,938
$1,423,778
$4,592,710
$25,334,378
$22,700,531
Total, In Millions
Total
$28,508,757
$18,198,841
$5,920,021
$52,627,619
Funding Sources
• Local funding: 2009 sources include City of Seattle General
Fund, the Seattle Housing Levy, and a development bonus
program.
• Federal funding: Federal sources include Community
Development Block Grant (CDBG), Emergency Shelter Grant
(ESG), HOME, Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS
(HOPWA), McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Funding.
CDBG Homelessness Prevention
Key funding for Seattle Prevention Strategy
• Housing Stability Case Management
• Connections to benefits and services
(PeoplePoint)
• Rental Assistance
• Legal Action Center
• Using HMIS
CDBG Homelessness Intervention
• CDBG meeting immediate needs and
moving people to housing
– Shelter and transitional housing outcomes
– day centers - connections to services
– early venture in rapid re-housing for
families
System Change in Prevention
• Historically two programs
– emergency rent assistance
– eviction prevention
• System Needed
– duplication between programs
– program consistency not easily evaluated
– not coordinated
Homelessness Prevention cont.
• RFP defined one program
• Combined HPRP, CDBG and local GF
• Consistent program descriptions and rules
across city contractors
• Well attended meetings/trainings with
contractor case managers
• HMIS to evaluate homelessness prevention
Homelessness Prevention cont.
• Targeting people more likely to become
homeless
• Improved Access
– Expanded reach to young adults and
immigrant and refugee communities
– 2-1-1 coordinated referrals
Housing Development:
$ Seattle Housing Levy: Voter approved 5 times!
$ Commercial and Residential Bonus Programs
$ HOME
$ Low Income Housing Tax Credits
$ State Housing Trust Fund, King County
$ Average: 24% of Total Development Cost
Housing: Choosing Borrowers
• Policy Documents
King County Combined Funders Notice of
Funding Availability for Homeless Housing
• NOFA 2x per year
• Timeframes aligned with
other capital funders
• Combined Homeless
Housing NOFA
• Service & Operating
RFP
City of Seattle
King County
Housing: The Rubik’s Cube
Sources and Uses
McKinney, Document
Recording Fees, Mental
Health Tax, United Way,
Seattle O&M, HSD,
Section 8, Vets and
Human Services Levy,
State O&M, Trust Fund,
Bonus, Housing Levy,
General Fund, Tax Credits,
HOPWA, HOME, CDBG!
Housing: Capital Coordination
• Reserve Levels
• Acquisition and
per-unit Costs
• Developer Fee
• Bidding and Contracting
• Section 3, Relocation,
Wages
• Construction Oversight
• Draw Reviews
• Retainage
Neighborhood Business District Program
• Neighborhood marketing and promotion
o Buy Local campaign, events, social media, farmers markets
• Business attraction and retention
o Business mix to serve residential needs
• Clean and safe initiatives
o Graffiti removal, dumpster free alleys, lighting, off-duty cops
• Physical improvements
o Streetscape, façade improvements, art
• Building a strong business focused organizational
capacity to sustain the effort
o Business Improvement Area (BIA) formation
Business Services: Financing
• Micro enterprises
• Home-based
businesses
• Micro businesses
• Small businesses
• Neighborhood-based
businesses
• Small businesses
• Medium-sized
businesses
• Energy efficiency
projects
• Higher risk
• Smaller projects
• Less sophisticated
borrowers
• Lower risk
• Larger projects
• More sophisticated
borrowers
RVCDF
OED Programs
and Partners
• Medium-sized
businesses
• Large capital
projects
CCD
ShoreBank
Enterprise
Cascadia
GSF /
NDC
NMTC
Recovery
Zone Bonds
• OED deploys a complex array of financing products that serve a broad
range of businesses, from micro-enterprises to large capital products
Workforce: Post-Secondary Attainment
1.7%
Professional
degree
2.4%
Master’s
degree
2.8%
$1,228
Bachelor’s
degree
3.7%
5.1%
$1,522
$978
$736
Associate’s
degree
$645
Some college, no
degree
5.7%
$591
High school
graduate
9.0%
Less than High
school
-9.00%
-4.50%
Unemployment Rate in 2008
0.00%
$426
$0
$500
$1,000
$1,500
$2,000
Median Weekly Earnings in 2008
Tale of Two Pipelines
100%
96%
Percent of students
87%
72%
70%
75%
57%
50%
44%
50%
22%
25%
8%
0%
Start of
Grade 9
Start of
Grade 10
Cleveland HS
Start of
Grade 11
Start of
On-Time
Going
Entering
Grade 12 Graduates directly to 2nd year of
college
college
Bellevue HS
Source: Graduation data from OSPI or Class of 2008; college data from Fouts & Associates for Class of 2004
4 Building Blocks of a Successful Adult Education
We are focusing on stimulating new completion
programs for working adults that can be taken to scale
Compressing the classroom time
Improve PSE performance:
What are the elements of
success that support
persistence and completion
of students who have
seldom found success in
traditional postsecondary
programs?
Reducing the complexity of
registration, course selection, and
class scheduling
Building support services into the
program
Including soft skills instruction,
labor market information, and job
placement support

similar documents