UCLA

Report
UCLA
Nanoscale Measurement System
Non-confidential summary of UCLA technology available for
licensing, Case reference: LA2004-660
Ken Polasko
March 18, 2005
Business Development Officer
Office of Intellectual Property Administration
[email protected]
www.research.ucla.edu/oipa
(310) 794-8087
Nanoscale Measurement System
Background
 Construction of hybrid bio-nanosystems relies on measuring
and optimizing forces and displacements at the molecular level.
 The measurement of the forces and displacements involved when attaching
biological material to inorganic material or micro electro mechanical
systems (MEMS) is becoming an increasing import design capability.
Problem
 Conventional force transducers (e.g. load sensors) have been the choice
for the measurement of forces however these sensors do not have the
required sensitivity.
 Conventional force microscopy relies on cantilever torsional modes for
measuring forces along the surface plane, implying in poor
visualization and sensitivity.
 Optical tweezers have been the choice for the measurement of forces
produced by single molecules however this techniques has limited force
range (pN).
Markets
 Force and displacement characterization tools for the
nanotechnology market.
Nanoscale Measurement System
Solution
 Prototype has been fabricated that can detect forces of ~ 0.2 nN and a corresponding
displacement of ~ 40 nm.
 The prototype incorporates a novel illumination system that permits excellent
visualization of biological material.
 The system design permits flexible handling of liquids.
 This system fills the gap between existing tools for measuring forces associated with
biological elements and purely atomic measurement systems.
Nanoscale Measurement System
Technological Status
Research
Discovery
Development
Technical
Feasibility
Integration
Commercialization
Prototype
Production
Nanoscale Measurement System
Nanoscale Measurement System
Inventors and Collaborators

Professor Carlo Montemagno, Department of
Bioengineering & Biomedical Engineering
 Professor Jacob Schmidt, Department of
Bioengineering & Biomedical Engineering
 Professor Toshikazu Hamasaki, Department of
Bioengineering & Biomedical Engineering
 Dr. Sergio Freire, Department of Bioengineering &
Biomedical Engineering
Intellectual Property

Provisional patent filed

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