POETRY POWER POINT #1

Report
An Introduction
POETRY BASICS
 Poetry: A type of literature that expresses
ideas, feelings, or tells a story in a specific
form
 Form: the appearance of the words on the
page
 Line: a group of words together on one line
of the poem
 Stanza: a group of lines arranged together
Identify…
“A Word is Dead”
By Emily Dickenson
STANZA 1
A word is dead
When it is said,
Some say.
How many lines?
I say it just
Begins to live
That day.
Stanza 2
KINDS OF STANZAS
Couplet
=
Triplet (Tercet) =
Quatrain
=
Quintet
=
Sestet (Sextet) =
Septet
=
Octave
=
a two line stanza
a three line stanza
a four line stanza
a five line stanza
a six line stanza
a seven line stanza
an eight line stanza
POINT OF VIEW IN POETRY
 Poet
 The author of the poem
 Speaker
 The “narrator” of the poem
 Addressee
 Person or thing the speaker is addressing
 Reader
 Person reading the poem aloud
RHYTHM
 The beat created by the sounds
of the word in a poem
 Rhythm can be created by
using:
 Meter
 Rhyme
 Alliteration
 Refrain
METER
 A pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables
 Meter occurs when the stressed and unstressed
syllables of the words in a poem are arranged in a
repeating pattern
 When poets write in meter, they count out the
number of stressed (strong) syllables and unstressed
(weak) syllables for each line. They then repeat the
pattern throughout the poem.
METER cont.
 Foot – unit of meter
 A foot can have two or
three syllables
 Usually consists of one
stressed and one
unstressed syllables
 Types of feet
 The types of feet are
determined by the
arrangement of
stressed and
unstressed syllables
METER cont.
TYPES OF FEET
Iambic – unstressed, stressed
Trochaic – stressed, unstressed
Anapestic – unstressed, unstressed, stressed
Dactylic – stressed, unstressed, unstressed
FREE VERSE POETRY
 Unlike metered poetry,
free verse poetry does
NOT have any
 Free verse poetry is
very conversationalsounds like someone
repeating patterns of
stressed and
unstressed syllables
 It usually does NOT
have rhyme
talking to you.
 A more modern type of
poetry.
FREE VERSE - EXAMPLE
“I Dream'd in a Dream”
by Walt Whitman
I dream’d in a dream I saw a city invincible to the attacks of
the whole of the rest of the earth,
I dream’d that was the new city of Friends,
Nothing was greater there than the quality of robust love, it
led the rest,
It was seen every hour in the actions of the men of that city,
And in all their looks and words.
Walt Whitman is not
around to ask what
he meant in this
poem….
What is your
interpretation?
Did he mean a real
city or perhaps
friendship?
BLANK VERSE POETRY
 Written in lines of iambic pentameter, but does NOT use
end rhyme.
Excerpt from Macbeth
by William Shakespeare
Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,
To the last syllable of recorded time;
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more: it is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.
RHYME
 Words sound alike
because they share the
same ending vowel and
consonant sounds
 A word always rhymes
with itself
LAMP
STAMP
 Share the same short “a”
vowel sound
 Share the combined
“mp” consonant sound
END RHYME
A word at the end of one line rhymes with a word
at the end of another line.
Hector the collector
Collected bits of string.
Collected dolls with broken heads
And rusty bells that would not ring.
INTERNAL RHYME
A word inside a line rhymes with another word on the
same line.
From “The Raven”
By Edgar Allan Poe
Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary.
NEAR RHYME or EYE RHYME
An “imperfect” rhyme or close rhyme.
 The words
EITHER share the
same vowel sound or
consonant sound
BUT NOT BOTH!
ROSE
LOSE
 Different vowel
sounds (long “o” and
“oo” sound)
 Share the same
consonant sound
RHYME SCHEME
 A pattern of rhyme (usually uses end rhyme but not always)
 Use the letters of the alphabet to represent different rhyme sounds so that
you can visually see the pattern.
“The Germ”
By Ogden Nash
A mighty creature is the germ,
Though smaller than the pachyderm
His customary dwelling place
Is deep within the human race.
His childish pride he often pleases
By giving people strange diseases.
Do you, my poppet, feel infirm?
You probably contain a germ.
ONOMATOPOEIA
Words that imitate the sound they are making.
The rusty spigot
sputters
utters
a splutter,
spatters,
scatters,
spurts,
finally stops sputtering
and splash!
gushes rushes splashes
clear water dashes.
Match the line to its sound
A plate being dropped on the floor
A balloon being burst
A gun being shot
Someone eating crisps
A light being switched on
A fierce dog
A small bell being rung
TINKLE
BANG
POP
SMASH
CRUNCH
GROWL
CLICK
ALLITERATION
Consonant sounds repeated at the beginning of words.
 Think tongue twisters
Consonance
 The repeating consonant sounds in a line or
If Peter Piper picked
a peck of pickled
peppers, how many
pickled peppers did
Peter Piper pick?
lines of poetry (can be anywhere in the words)
“Silken, sad, uncertain, rustling”
Assonance
 The repeating vowel sound in a line or lines
of poetry
Lake, fate, base, fade
(all share the long “a” sound)
I am the shadow
REPETITION
Using the same word or
phrase more than once
in a poem.
 Does not include
pronouns or
conjunctions
 Can sometimes be
called the refrain if it’s
a stanza that repeats
By the classroom wall,
I am watching you,
And I know it all.
Don’t try to run
Or hide from me.
There isn’t a thing
I cannot see.
Don’t cheat on a test,
Or lie to a friend,
I know the truth
From beginning to end.
I am the shadow
By the classroom wall,
I am watching you,
And I know it all . . .
And I know it all.
And I know it all.
I’m watching you,
And I know it all.

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