Slide 1

Report
CCCCIO Fall 2008 Conference
October 29, 2008
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Mark Wade Lieu, ASCCC President, Ohlone
College
Barbara Illowsky, BSI Project Director, De
Anza College
Janet Fulks, Bakersfield College
Karen Wong, Skyline College
Miya Squires, Butte College
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Constructing a Framework for
Success: A Holistic Approach to
Basic Skills
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A chapter for administrators by
administrators
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Explanations of the Basic Skills Funding
Explanations about the action and
expenditure plans
Statewide analysis of the submitted action
plans
Minimum qualifications for faculty
Assigning courses to disciplines
Rubric
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Basic Skills
Students
Non-Basic Skills
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What type of statewide success
do we see amongst students
with basic skills needs?
College Level Performance Indicator
State Rate
1. Student Progress & Achievement
51.2%
2. Completed 30 or More Units
70.4%
3. Fall to Fall Persistence
68.3%
4. Vocational Course Completion
78.2%
5. Basic Skills Course Completion
60.5%
6. ESL Course Improvement
44.7%
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Academic Year
ESL Success
Rate
English
Success Rate
Math
Success Rate
Total Basic
Skills
Success
Rate
01-02
68.7%
59.5%
53.7%
61.2%
02-03
69.8%
60.7%
56.2%
62.7%
03-04
69.8%
60.5%
55.1%
62.2%
04-05
69.7%
59.4%
53.7%
61.3%
05-06
69.9%
58.8%
52.5%
60.6%
06-07
70.6%
59.3%
52.2%
60.5%
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What do you think?
Are the students who assess into a basic
skills course, taking the course?
Are the data accurate?
Are we unable to make changes?
Do we rely too heavily on part-time
faculty?
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California Community Colleges 2006-07
Unduplicated Student Enrollments in Credit and
Noncredit Basic Skills and ESL
ENROLLMENT
% OF TOTAL
ENROLLMENT
BS or ESL (credit)
326,478
12.45%
BS or ESL
(noncredit)
393,004
14.99%
Neither Basic Skills
nor ESL
1,901,963
72.56%
Total
2,621,445
100%
ENROLLMENT
CATEGORY
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Each year between 500,000 and 700,000
students take a basic skills course.
How many move on?
2002-2003 to
2004-2005
Number of 126,307
Students
2003-2004 to
2005-2006
2004-2005 to
2006-2007
122,880
123,682
The number of students completing
coursework at least one level above their prior
basic skills enrollment within the three-year
cohort period.
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A. Less than 10%
B. 15- 30%
C. Approximately 40%
D. Over 60%
E. 80% or more
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Ethnicity
% of Total
Headcount
% of Total
Enrollment in
Credit Basic
Skills & ESL
% of Enrollment
in Non-credit
Basic Skills &
ESL
African American
7.49%
11.24%
6.23%
Asian/
Filipino/Pac
Islander
16.40%
17.00%
19.39%
Hispanic/
Latino
28.79%
41.40%
43.72%
Native American
0.86%
0.92%
0.54%
White
35.40%
22.57%
18.69%
Total
100%
100%
100%
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70-85% assess into basic skills
 27.4% take basic skills classes
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Where are the rest?
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A. Apply advisories to all college level courses.
B. Students will never take advisories, apply
appropriate prerequisites.
C. Assess all students and require them to take the
basic skills courses they assess into, within a
time frame.
D. Use the college as a filter, let anyone register for
anything and allow them the right to fail.
E. Create options that enable students to complete
basic skills work.
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May & June Regional Meetings
Summer Teaching Institute
Fall Regional Meetings
Workshops-to-go
Effective Practices Data Base
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Integrated Reading and Writing
Course One Level Below Transfer
Reading Co/Prerequisite
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2006 Pre-Transfer English &
Reading Placements
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45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
74% of 1752
place in pretransfer
English
English
Reading
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70% of 2519
place in pretransfer
Reading
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2001
Reading Co/Prerequisite
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Service Course
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Text- Based Essay Assignments
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Fall 2006
Concurrent Enrollment
Success
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
Concurrent
Without
English 836
Reading 836
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Integration of Reading and
Writing One Level
Below Transfer
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Fulfills the SLOs and course objectives
of the standalone courses
Five unit integration course versus six
unit standalone reading and writing
courses
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Ideal-- three days a week at 1.5 hours per
class
Faculty possess minimum qualifications
to teach both reading and writing
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Fall 2004-2006
Success and Retention
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
Integrated
Standalone English
Standalone Reading
Retention
Success
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Fall 2003-2005
Subsequent Success in
Transfer Level English
Standalone to
Transfer Level
English
Integrated to
Transfer Level
English
Retention
7 % higher
9 % higher
Success
13 % higher
15% higher
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Support to Initially Create
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Grants to support research and resultant
curriculum development for initial piloting
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Reassigned time
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Scheduling
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Enforcement of Minimum Qualifications
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Faculty with whom to collaborate
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Lower retention and success rates as
we’ve expanded
Classroom allocation for piloting
configuration
Inadequate communication to students
that the course is accelerated
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Data from the Office of Research,
Planning, and Institutional Effectiveness
Adequate time to engage in assessing of
SLOs
Professional development
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Effective Practices Include:
Center for Academic Success (CAS)
 Critical Skills Workshops
 Critical Skills Study Hour Course
 Reading and Writing Center
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Located on the main floor of
the Learning Resource
Center
• Serves up to 5,000
students per
semester, logging
around 48,000
student use hours
•
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Critical Skills are any
specific skills that an
individual student
may need to further
develop in order to
succeed in a specific
course.
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The Critical Skills
term is not intended
to represent broad
Basic Skills.
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Critical Skills Workshops offer onehour, focused instruction in five subject
areas:
 Study Skills
 Reading
 Writing
 Math
 Computer Skills
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Spring 2003
Fall 2003
Spring 2004
Fall 2004
Spring 2005
Fall 2005
Spring 2006
Fall 2006
Spring 2007
Fall 2007
Spring 2008
116
271
261
384
1,255
1,398
1,784
2,020
2,307
2,284
3,223
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0.5 unit EDUC courses are linked to levelappropriate subject-specific courses.
 Examples:
 EDUC 10 w/ HIST 8
 EDUC 110 w/ MATH 108
 EDUC 210 w/ LEAD 219
Areas of skills development needs are
identified via:
 Individual student needs, based on past
classroom experience, learning styles
survey results, study behavior inventory
results, etc.
 Input from content course instructor
“I’ve realized there are lots of things I
can do to be a better student. I’m not
as passive as I was . . . I’m more alert
in class, I ask questions, I talk to the
teacher, and I write more things
down. It was hard to change how I am
at first, but I know it’s helping me in
my classes.”
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Requirements for 0.5 unit credit:
 Three half-hour meetings with CAS faculty
 Eight Critical Skills workshops and
homework assignments
Course is Credit/No Credit, open entry/open
exit.
Course may be repeated three times at each
level.
“This course helped me write papers in
my linked class . . . I’m familiar now
with the use of commas, semicolons,
and colons. I try to use these because I
like to be able to write longer sentences
to communicate my meaning . . . I
reread my papers now and can catch
many errors before bringing them to a
tutor . . . The study hour course helped
me make progress in this difficult area.”
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Fall 2004:
Spring 2005:
Fall 2005:
Spring 2006:
Fall 2006:
Spring 2007:
Fall 2007:
Spring 2008:
9 enrolled
4 completed
26 enrolled14 completed
24 enrolled19 completed
63 enrolled51 completed
63 enrolled51 completed
70 enrolled53 completed
70 enrolled45 completed
49 enrolled37 completed
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Increases FTES
Increases retention and persistence rates.
Enhances students’ ability to think
metacognitively about learning and studying,
increasing transference of learned skills to
future courses (not as prominent in
individualized tutoring).
Exposes students in need of skills
development to the resources and learning
community supported in CAS.
?
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It’s all about the students!
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