ppFirst1 - Alcoholics Anonymous (Great Britain) Ltd

Report
Alcoholics
Anonymous
as a Resource
for Health &
Social Care
Professionals
Introduction
The AA Preamble
What is AA ?
A fellowship
Shared
experience of
alcoholism
Helping others
to recover
What is AA ?
Requires a
desire to stop
drinking
Selfsupporting
No dues
or fees
What is AA ?
Neither sectarian,
denominational
nor political
Noncontroversial
AA’s Primary Purpose
To stay sober
To help others achieve
sobriety
Our aim
To inform about Alcoholics
Anonymous
The 12 Step Recovery
Programme
How we can help
AA in Great Britain has over 60 years
experience.
A resource to help patients suffering
from alcoholism
Recovery is available free.
Some history
1935: AA started in USA
Has grown around the world to 160
countries with 2,100,000 members
in 110,000 groups
1947: started in Great Britain
40,000 members in 4800 groups in GB
and Continental Europe
How AA views alcoholism
A progressive illness
A spiritual, emotional and
physical illness
A physical addiction and a
mental obsession
How AA views alcoholism
Loss of power to control
drinking
A way of prevention remains
undiscovered
AA helps
Those who are already
alcoholics and want to stop
drinking
To learn how to live a normal,
happy life without alcohol
AA as a service
Personal, subjective experience
shared with another
Totally confidential and anonymous
We help ourselves by trying to help
others
An informal person-to-person
approach
Who runs AA?
No rules, regulations or official
governing authority
AA relies on experience-based
Traditions, on suggestion and
example
Local groups are autonomous
Individual and collective responsibility
What does it cost?
To you and the taxpayer
Nothing!
What does AA cost?
Each group is self-supporting by
members’ voluntary contributions
AA accepts no funds from any outside
sources
All surplus funds are used to carry the AA
message to the active alcoholic and to
inform the public about AA
More about alcoholics
In our experience there is no
“typical” alcoholic
Drinking patterns differ
Confidence, feelings, fear
Resistance
Rationalisation and denial
What happens at AA meetings?
“Open” and “Closed” meetings
Usually between 10 and 40 people,
lasting about 90 minutes
Getting to a meeting – the Helpline
Support and reassurance for
newcomers
AA’s Pledge
When anyone, anywhere reaches
out for help, I want the hand of AA
always to be there
And for that: I am responsible
NATIONAL HELPLINE NUMBER
0845 769 7555
AA Availability
There are Alcoholics Anonymous
meetings every day of the week
throughout Great Britain
Professionals can contact the Helpline
and local AA Health Liaison Officer
Attend open meetings, where visitors are
welcome
How to find out more about AA
AA General Service Office
PO Box 1, 10, Toft Green,
York YO1 7NJ
Tel: 01904 644026
Northern Service
Office – Glasgow
Southern Service
Office – London
Tel: 0141 226 2214
Tel: 020 7833 0022
www.alcoholics-anonymous.org.uk
[email protected]

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