Updated NJ Professional Teaching Standards

Report
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Professional Development
and Mentoring for
NJ Educators
NJAFPA, October 23, 2014
Cathy Pine, Ph.D.
Director, Office of Prof. Development
TLE Division, NJDOE
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Agenda
Office Overview
What’s New: Teacher Mentoring
Role of the School Improvement Panel
What’s New: Professional Standards for Teachers
19
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
TLE Division: Areas of Focus
Recruitment
and Preparation
Retention and
Separation
Professional
Development
Licensure and
Certification
Evaluation
3
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
PD Office Focus
• State-level policies and programs supporting
on-going professional growth and development
of teachers and school leaders including:
 Professional development requirements
 Standards for professional development
 Professional standards for teachers and school
leaders
 Induction and mentoring supports for new teachers
and school leaders
• Key questions going forward: What are impacts
of supports on educator effectiveness & student
learning? What is the State’s role?
4
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Brief History of Educator Support Work in NJ
•1998 -99– State teacher PD initiative launched; PTSB appointed
•2001 – Teacher PD requirements implem.; initial PD stds adopted
•2003 – Prof. Standards for Teaching and Leadership adopted;
mentoring first required for novice teachers
•2004 - PDAC for school leaders formed; mentoring toolkit introduced
•2005 – School leader PD requirements implemented; mentoring for
novice school leaders initiated
•2006 – NJ Collaborative Prof. Learning Toolkit piloted
•2007 – PD standards updated; school-level PD planning regs added
•2009 – Collaborative PL partnership initiated; PLC initiative launched
•2010 – NJ PD policies cited as exemplary in Stanford research study
•2012 – TEACH NJ statute adopted; transformation taskforce report
•2013 – PD regulations revised; PD standards updated
• 2014 - Teacher mentoring regulations revised; professional teaching
standards updated; PD policies reviewed by PD coached review
working group ; State Committee on Professional Learning begins 5
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Current Work
• District support on revised regulations for PD (2013) and
teacher mentoring (2014)
•State PD requirements chart
http://www.nj.gov/education/profdev/topics/
•Guidance materials (SCIP handbook; revised mentoring
toolkit and district mentoring plan template)
•Review of administrator mentoring programs
•Title IIA discretionary grant oversight: Using Formative
Assessments to Improve Teaching and Learning
•Proposal to USDE to collect exploratory data on districts’ PD
plans and PD implementation
6
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
For More Information
•Websites:
http://www.state.nj.us/education/profdev/
http://www.nj.gov/education/AchieveNJ/scip/
•Email Help Line:
[email protected]
•Office contact info:
609-943-4201
[email protected]
[email protected]
7
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Agenda
Office Overview
What’s New: Teacher Mentoring
Role of the School Improvement Panel
What’s New: Professional Standards for Teachers
19
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Vocabulary: Induction and Mentoring
Induction = Programs and practices used to
help beginning teachers become competent
and effective professionals, including
developing an understanding of local school,
community and culture.
Mentoring = The predominant form of
induction practice in which an experienced
teacher provides dedicated support to a
beginning teacher.
9
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Why We Need Systems of Beginning Teacher
Support
•Conditions of the beginning teacher’s workplace
 Full responsibility from day one - Novice teachers
perform the same work as veteran teachers
 Inequities in teaching assignments – Novice
teachers are frequently assigned to teach least
proficient students
 Lack of curriculum and other key resources
 Isolation - Teachers spend most of their time
physically apart from colleagues
10
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Reasons for New Teacher Support (cont.)
• Teacher turnover epidemic
 20% of teachers leave the profession after
first year; 40-50% of new teachers leave the
profession in first 5 years; cite poor support
and working conditions, ineffective leadership
 Each day, 1000 teachers leave the profession
 Each day, 1000 teachers change districts
 Nationally, billions of dollars are spent each
year to counteract teacher attrition
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New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Benefits of Induction for Beginning Teachers
• Introduction to culture and norms of the
professional community
• Reduced isolation; increased emotional
support
• Individual support and feedback on
professional practice
• Improved confidence and job satisfaction
• Improved instruction
12
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Benefits of Induction for School/District
• Improved staff retention rates and reduced
costs of teacher turnover
• Opportunities for experienced staff to
provide leadership and strengthen their
own practice
• Improved professional community,
collaboration and organizational stability
• Improved teaching performance leading to
improved student learning
13
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
High Quality Induction Is a Good Investment
Investing in high quality
induction
More effective practice;
more organizational stability
Improved student
achievement
14
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Revised NJ Mentoring Regulations: May 5, 2014
Impetus for change - to align with:
• TEACH NJ requirements/language
• Revised PD regulations
• Research and best practices
Intent of revisions:
• Specify baseline supports for all non-tenured teachers (not just
novice)
• Maintain accountability but reduce district reporting burden
• Build in flexibility for district design and implementation
• Update the vocabulary and organization of current regulations
Key areas addressed:
• Mentoring support
• Mentor selection
• Mentor training
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• District accountability for implem.; mentor payment process
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Mentoring Support
• Supports added for experienced teachers new to a
district
 Via extensive district orientation and individual supports
organized through the PDP process based on levels of
preparation and experience
• Continued 1-1 supports for novice teachers
 For full academic year
 Includes guided self-assessment on district eval. instrument
 Alternate route teachers meet with mentor at least once per
week for first 8 weeks; support linked to teacher prep
curriculum
 Traditional route teachers meet with mentor at least once
per week for first 4 weeks
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 Mentors keep logs of contact time
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Mentor Selection and Training
• Mentors must receive an effective or highly effective
rating on district evaluation rubric after 2014 ratings are
compiled
• Mentor must have completed three years of full-time
teaching experience, two within the past five years
• Mentor may not serve as mentee’s direct supervisor
or conduct teacher evaluations
• Mentor training curriculum must include: district
evaluation rubric; classroom observation skills;
facilitating adult learning; leading reflective
conversations about practice; CCSS; NJ professional
teaching standards
17
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
District Level Implementation and Accountability
• CSA responsible for creating the mentoring plan
• District board of education reviews for fiscal impact
• CSA/superintendent submits annual statement of
assurance (SOA) to County Office
• Non-publics submit annual SOA to Provisional
Teacher Program Office/Licensing
• Plan is kept in district
• Plan shared with each School Improvement Panel
(ScIP)
• Mentor logs submitted to central office
• Central office mediates mentor payments
18
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
School Level Implementation and Accountability
• ScIP oversees implementation of district mentoring
program at school level, keeping in mind
confidentiality concerns
19
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Going Forward
Districts should:
• Revise their mentoring plans to align with new regulations,
particularly to ensure the proper orientations are in place for
experienced teachers new to the district
• Submit SOA to county office (SOAs were due July 1)
• Share district plan with School Improvement Panels and discuss
how ScIPs can support it at the building level
• Create a mentor contact log sheet ,a process for collecting these
in central office, and a process for paying mentors
(No paid mentors are required for experienced first-year
teachers new to the district)
 Identify or create mentor training activities
20
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Going Forward
Schools should:
• Create a climate of support and collaboration
• Determine how ScIPs will support the mentoring program
• Ensure each provisional teacher receives a 1-1 mentor and is
registered with the Provisional Teacher Program
• Ensure new teachers have an individual PD plan
• Ensure mentors’ needs for resources and contact time are met
• Ensure other requirements of Provisional Teacher Program are
met
21
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Agenda
Office Overview
What’s New: Teacher Mentoring
Role of the School Improvement Panel
What’s New: Professional Standards for Teachers
19
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
TEACHNJ Act Emphasizes Support and Growth
• Identifies mentoring, evaluation and professional development as
elements needed to assure educator effectiveness
• Requires PD for teaching staff members through an individual PD
plan
• Creates the School Improvement Panel (SCIP) with responsibility
for oversight of teacher mentoring, recommending PD
opportunities and ensuring that evaluations are implemented
• Requires a corrective action plan and additional PD for struggling
teaching staff members not meeting performance standards in
summative performance evaluation
• Requires all new first-year teachers to be mentored in a researchbased program that is based on professional standards for
teachers
23
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Important ScIP Considerations
• Will the ScIP be expanded to include more teachers?
(teachers must make up at least 1/3 of the committee)
• What is the ScIP’s relationship to the school-level PD
committee (if one still exists)?
• What is the ScIP’s relationship to the district-level DEAC?
• How will the principal share necessary data and information
with the ScIP while respecting confidentiality concerns?
• How will this committee have powerful conversations about
teacher support and growth while respecting the
confidentiality of individuals?
24
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
What the ScIP Should and Should Not Do
ScIP should:
• Review aggregate mentorship, evaluation and professional
learning data to make informed program improvements
• Promote organized, transparent communication
ScIP should not:
• Allow teachers to conduct observations without approval
from local representation
• Examine evaluation or mentorship data at the individual
teacher level
25
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
How the ScIP Can Support Professional Learning
• Identify PL learning needs:
Analyze aggregate evaluation data according to the
observation instrument
Use needs assessments, surveys, emails, other staff input
• Create plans for implementing the necessary activities and
supports
Short-term PL activities
Long-term PD planning
• Support the principal in developing the school-level PD plan
and revise as necessary
• Review the NJ Standards for Professional Learning to ensure
that the PL is of high quality
26
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
How the ScIP Can Support the District Mentoring Program
• Identify new teachers in building, be accessible and serve as
source of information and encouragement
• Ensure that each new teacher has a PD plan - the mentor can
assist in developing this
• Identify the critical needs of new teachers
 Analyzing aggregate evaluation data according to the observation
instrument
 Surveys or emails to get feedback from new teachers
• Ensure that teachers who are hired later in the year receive
appropriate training and support
• Support mentor teachers by helping to arrange scheduling
and substitutes; ensuring they have necessary training and
resources
27
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Agenda
Office Overview
What’s New: Teacher Mentoring
Role of the School Improvement Panel
What’s New: Professional Standards for Teachers
19
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Updated NJ Professional Teaching Standards: May 5, 2014
Impetus for change
• Previous standards 10 years old
• Implement recommendation from the
2012 NJ Transformation Task Force that
standards should reflect new national
standards
• Align with cooperative national effort
that created the revised InTASC “Model
Core Teaching Standards” (released in
April, 2011)
• Align standards with all parts of our
effectiveness system – evaluation
practice instruments and pre-service
accreditation standards
“These Model Core Teaching
Standards articulate what effective
teaching and learning looks like in a
transformed public education system
– one that empowers every learner
to take ownership of their learning,
that emphasizes the learning content
and application of knowledge and
skill to real world problems, that
values the differences each learner
brings to the learning experience,
and leverages rapidly changing
learning environments by recognizing
the possibilities they bring to
maximize learning and engage
learners.”
(InTASC Model Core Teaching
Standards, CCSSO, 2011)
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New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Overview of 2014 NJ Professional Teaching Standards
Previous Standards (2003)
New Standards
Adapted from INTASC (Interstate New
Teacher Assessment & Support
Consortium) national standards to reflect
NJ priorities and statutory requirements
Adapted from 2011 InTASC (Interstate
Teacher Assessment & Support Consortium)
Model Core Standards to reflect NJ priorities
and statutory requirements
Focus is on professional practice of new
teachers
Focus on professional practice across the
continuum of teacher development
Reflect knowledge, performances and
dispositions teachers need to support
student learning
Reflect knowledge, performances and
dispositions teachers need to be effective in
supporting all students to be college- and
career-ready and to implement the Common
Core State Standards
Incorporate an evidence-base on effective
practice
Incorporate updated and most current
evidence-base on effective practice
Not explicitly aligned with approved
evaluation teacher practice instruments
Align with approved evaluation teacher
practice instruments; pre-service
accreditation standards
30
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Organization of 2014 NJ Professional Teaching Standards
Previous Standards (2003)
2014 Standards
Specify Knowledge, Dispositions &
Performances under each standard
Specify Performances, Essential Knowledge,
& Critical Dispositions under each standard
Std 1: Subject Matter Knowledge
Std 2: Human Growth and Development
Std 3: Diverse Learners
Std 4: Instructional Planning and
Strategies
Std 5: Assessment
Std 6: Learning Environment
Std 7: Special Needs
Std 8: Communication
Std 9: Collaboration and Partnership
Std 10: Professional Development
Std 11: Professional Responsibility
The Learner and Learning (Stds 1-3)
Std 1: Learner Development
Std 2: Learning Differences
Std 3: Learning Environments
Content (Stds 4-5)
Std 4: Content Knowledge
Std 5: Application of Content
Instructional Practice (Stds 6-8)
Std 6: Assessment
Std 7: Planning for Instruction
Std 8: Instructional Strategies
Professional Responsibility (Stds 9-11)
Std 9: Professional Learning
Std 10: Leadership and Collaboration
Std 11: Ethical Practice
31
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Updated Standards: Key Themes
Key Themes
Rationale
Students’ application of
knowledge and skills
Teachers need to support students in acquiring 21st century skills and
meeting more rigorous content standards by designing learning
opportunities which incorporate the use of high-order skills to solve
real-world problems
Personalized learning for
diverse learners
Teachers must be able to customize learning for students with a range
of individual differences
Assessment literacy
Teachers must have the skills to develop a range of assessments and to
use assessment data to improve instruction
Collaborative professional
culture
Teacher leadership
Teachers, administrators and others share responsibility for student
learning; teaching is not done in isolation.
Teachers must actively investigate and share new ideas to advance the
profession; teachers advocate for student needs.
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New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Connecting
the
Education
Workforce
Dots
Core Teaching
Standards
Student
Success
High Quality
Instruction &
Leadership
Growth
Opportunities
& Supports
Educator &
System
Accountability
Professional
Development
Standards
Data
Standards
Common
Core State
Standards for
Students
School Leader
Standards
33
New Jersey
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
For More Information
•Websites:
http://www.state.nj.us/education/profdev/
http://www.nj.gov/education/AchieveNJ/scip/
•Email Help Line:
[email protected]
•Office contact info:
609-943-4201
[email protected]
[email protected]
34

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