KIMBERLEY HARRINGTON - OCTOBER 2013

Report
Connecting CCSS, PARCC, and SGOs
to Raise Student Achievement
New Jersey Council of Education
October 4, 2013
Why do we need the CCSS?
2
Teacher Checklist
Individually, check the items that effective teachers do in
your school.
 Teach a curriculum that is aligned to standards.
 Determine the needs of students using several
methods including a variety of assessments.
 Differentiate instruction based on the needs of
students.
 Set goals for students appropriate to their grade, subject,
and readiness level.
 Use high quality assessments to measure student
performance.
 Work in collaborative groups to improve student
achievement.
In Requiring Teachers to Develop SGOs,
What Are We Asking Them To Do?
 Teach a curriculum that is aligned to standards.
 Determine the needs of students using several
methods including a variety of assessments.
 Differentiate instruction based on the needs of
students.
 Set goals for students appropriate to their grade,
subject, and readiness level.
 Use high quality assessments to measure student
performance.
 Work in collaborative groups to improve student
achievement.
 Formalize and document the process, and be
recognized for doing these things well.
Introduction to the ELA Shifts of
the Common Core
State Standards
Independence
Search:
Shift + Control + F
7
The CCSS Requires Three Shifts in
ELA/Literacy
1. Building knowledge through content-rich
nonfiction
2. Reading, writing, and speaking grounded in
evidence from text, both literary and
informational
3. Regular practice with complex text and its
academic language
8
PARCC’s Core Commitments to
ELA/Literacy Assessment Quality
•
•
•
•
Texts Worth Reading: The assessments will use authentic texts
worthy of study instead of artificially produced or commissioned
passages.
Questions Worth Answering: Sequences of questions that draw
students into deeper encounters with texts will be the norm (as in an
excellent classroom), rather than sets of random questions of varying
quality.
Better Standards Demand Better Questions: Instead of reusing
existing items, PARCC will develop custom items to the Standards.
Fidelity to the Standards (now in Teachers’ hands): PARCC
evidences are rooted in the language of the Standards so that
expectations remain the same in both instructional and assessment
settings.
What is an SGO?
A Student Growth Objective is a long-term academic goal that
teachers set for groups of students and must be:
• Specific and measureable
• Aligned to New Jersey’s Common Core State Standards or
Core Curriculum Content Standards
• Based on available prior student learning data
• A measure of student learning between two points in time
SGO Guidebook pg. 3
ELA Shift #1: Content-Rich
Nonfiction
• Balance of literary to informational texts
• 50/50 in K-5
• 45/55 in grades 6-8
• 30/70 in grades 9-12
• Beginning in grades 2, students read more complex
texts, combining foundational skills with reading
comprehension.
•
Reading aloud texts that are well-above grade level are
used K-5 and beyond to build vocabulary and
background knowledge.
10
Grade 3
Grade 3
ELA Shift #2: Using Text Evidence
•
Most college and workplace writing requires
evidence.
•
Ability to cite evidence differentiates strong
from weak student performance on NAEP
•
Evidence is a major emphasis of the ELA
Standards:
•
•
•
Reading Standard 1
Writing Standard 9
Speaking and Listening Standards 2, 3, and 4
13
14
Lincoln’s “Gettysburg Address”
Not Text-Dependent
• Why did the North fight
the civil war?
• Have you ever been to a
funeral or gravesite?
• Lincoln says that the
nation is dedicated to the
proposition that “all men
are created equal.” Why
is equality an important
value to promote?
Text-Dependent
“The Gettysburg Address”
mentions the year 1776.
According to Lincoln’s
speech, why is this year
significant to the events
described in the speech?
15
Grade 10 Prose ConstructedResponse Item
Use what you have learned from reading “Daedalus and Icarus” by
Ovid and “To a Friend Whose Work Has Come to Triumph” by Anne
Sexton to write an essay that provides an analysis of how Sexton
transforms Daedalus and Icarus.
As a starting point, you may want to consider what is emphasized,
absent, or different in the two texts, but feel free to develop your own
focus for analysis.
Develop your essay by providing textual evidence from both texts. Be
sure to follow the conventions of standard English.
16
Grade 10 Evidence-Based SelectedResponse Item
Part A
Which of the following sentences best states an important theme about human behavior as described in Ovid’s
“Daedalus and Icarus”?
a. Striving to achieve one’s dreams is a worthwhile endeavor.
b. The thoughtlessness of youth can have tragic results.*
c. Imagination and creativity bring their own rewards.
d. Everyone should learn from his or her mistakes.
Part B
Select three pieces of evidence from Ovid’s “Daedalus and Icarus” that support the answer to Part A.
a. “and by his playfulness retard the work/his anxious father planned” (lines 310-311)*
b. “But when at last/the father finished it, he poised himself” (lines 312-313)
c. “he fitted on his son the plumed wings/ with trembling hands, while down his withered cheeks/the tears were
falling” (lines 327-329)
d. “Proud of his success/the foolish Icarus forsook his guide” (lines 348-349)*
e. “and, bold in vanity, began to soar/rising above his wings to touch the skies” (lines 350-351)*
f. “and as the years went by the gifted youth/began to rival his instructor’s art” (lines 376-377)
g. “Wherefore Daedalus/enraged and envious, sought to slay the youth” (lines 384-385)
h. “The Partridge hides/in shaded places by the leafy trees…for it is mindful of its former fall” (lines 395-396, 399)
ELA Shift #3: Complex Text &
Academic Language
•
There is a 4 year gap in the complexity of what students
read by the end of high school and college.
•
What students can read, in terms of complexity is the
greatest predictor of success in college (ACT study).
•
•
<50% of graduates can read sufficiently complex texts.
•
Standards include a staircase of text complexity from
elementary through high school.
Standards focus on building academic vocabulary to
improve comprehension.
17
What are the Qualitative Features
of Complex Text?
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Subtle and/or frequent transitions
•
•
Longer paragraphs
Multiple and/or subtle themes and purposes
Density of information
Unfamiliar settings, topics or events
Lack of repetition, overlap or similarity in words and sentences
Complex sentences
Uncommon vocabulary
Lack of words, sentences or paragraphs that review or pull things
together for the student
Any text structure which is less narrative and/or mixes structures
18
19
Which text is more complex?
Text 1
Text 2
•Lincoln was shaken by the
presidency. Back in Springfield,
politics had been a sort of
exhilarating game; but in the White
House, politics was power, and power
was responsibility. Never before had
Lincoln held executive office. In
public life he had always been an
insignificant legislator whose votes
were cast in concert with others and
whose decisions in themselves had
neither finality nor importance. As
President he might consult with
others, but innumerable grave
decisions were in the end his own,
and with them came a burden of
responsibility terrifying in its
dimensions.
•According to those who knew him,
Lincoln was a man of many faces. In
repose, he often seemed sad and
gloomy. But when he began to speak,
his expression changed. “The dull,
listless features dropped like a mask,”
said a Chicago newspaperman. “The
eyes began to sparkle, the mouth to
smile, the whole countenance was
wreathed in animation, so that a
stranger would have said, ‘Why, this
man, so angular and solemn a moment
ago, is really handsome.’”
20
Close Analytic Reading
•
Requires prompting students with text-dependent
questions to unpack complex text and gain knowledge.
•
Text dependent questions require text-based answers –
evidence.
•
Not teacher summarizing text, but guiding students
through the text for information.
•
Virtually every standard is activated during the course of
every close analytic reading exemplar through the use of
text dependent questions.
•
Supports fluency
Grade 7 Research Task
22
Scaffolds for Reading Complex Text
Chunking
Reading and rereading
Read aloud
Strategic think aloud
Scaffolding questions
Heterogeneous small groups
Recording
Pre-prepping struggling readers to support confidence
and participation
• Annotation strategies
• Cornell notes
• Paraphrasing and journaling
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Grade 6
What are the Obstacles and
Opportunities of the
Common Core State Standards?
CCSS - ELA
Processing the Shifts - ELA
ELA Shifts
Building knowledge through
content-rich nonfiction
Reading, writing and speaking
grounded in evidence from text,
both literary and informational
Regular practice with complex
text and its academic language
What is the shift?
Why this shift?
Obstacles
Opportunities
General or Specific SGOs
SGOs can be classified as “general” or “specific.” However, in
some cases, the line between these is blurry. It is better to think of
general and specific SGOs being on a continuum.
General
Specific
•
Broad
•
Focused
•
Includes a significant proportion of
the curriculum and key standards
for a given course
•
Includes a particular subgroup
of a teacher’s students, and/or
•
Includes specific content or
skill
•
Includes all, or a significant
number, of a teacher’s students
Introduction to the Math Shifts
of the Common Core
State Standards
Dan Meyer:
Math Class Needs a Makeover
The CCSS Requires Three Shifts in Mathematics
1. Focus strongly where the standards focus.
2. Coherence: Think across grades, and link to major
topics.
3. Rigor: In major topics, pursue conceptual
understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and
application.
29
Traditional U.S. Approach
K
Number and
Operations
Measurement
and Geometry
Algebra and
Functions
Statistics and
Probability
12
Shift #1: Focus (within Number and Operations)
Operations and Algebraic
Thinking
Expressions
 and
Equations
Number and Operations—
Base Ten

K
1
2
3
4
Algebra
The Number
System
Number and
Operations—
Fractions



5
6
7
8
High School
Math Shift #1: Focus strongly
where the standards focus
• Greater focus not mile-wide, inch-deep
• Focus deeply on the major work of each grade so
students gain strong foundations:
▫
▫
▫
Solid conceptual understanding
High degree of procedural skill and fluency
Ability to apply the math they know to solve problems inside and
outside the classroom
32
Priorities in Mathematics
Grade
Priorities in Support of Rich Instruction and
Expectations of Fluency and Conceptual Understanding
K–2
Addition and subtraction, measurement using
whole number quantities
3–5
Multiplication and division of whole numbers
and fractions
6
7
8
Ratios and proportional reasoning; early
expressions and equations
Ratios and proportional reasoning; arithmetic
of rational numbers
Linear algebra/linear functions
Grade 3 – Fractions on a number line
6th Grade - ratios
Math Shift #2: Coherence: think across grades,
and link to major topics within grades
• Thinking across grades:
▫
The Standards are designed around coherent progressions from
grade to grade.
▫
Teachers can begin to count on deep conceptual understanding
of core content and build on it.
▫
Each standard is not a new event, but an extension of previous
learning.
• Linking to major topics:
▫
Serve as the grade level focus – they keep additional or
supporting topics from detracting from the focus
36
Linking to major topics – Grade 7
Part
B
Linking to major topics – high school
Part
B
Math Shift #3: Rigor: in major topics pursue:
conceptual understanding, procedural skill and
fluency, and application with equal intensity
•
Conceptual Understanding:
▫
•
Procedural skill and fluency:
▫
•
Teachers support students’ ability to access concepts from a number of
perspectives so students are able to see math as more than a set of
mnemonics or discrete procedures
The Standards call for speed and accuracy in calculation.
Application:
▫
The Standards call for students to use math flexibly for applications.
▫
Teachers provide opportunities for students to apply math in context.
▫
Teachers in content areas outside of math, particularly science, ensure
that students are using math to make meaning of and access content.
41
Fluency
Required Fluencies in K-6
Grade
Standard
K
K.OA.5
Add/subtract within 5
1
1.OA.6
Add/subtract within 10
2.OA.2
Add/subtract within 20 (know single-digit sums from
memory)
2
3
2.NBT.5
3.OA.7
3.NBT.2
Required Fluency
Add/subtract within 100
Multiply/divide within 100 (know single-digit products
from memory)
Add/subtract within 1000
4
4.NBT.4
Add/subtract within 1,000,000
5
5.NBT.5
Multi-digit multiplication
6
6.NS.2,3
Multi-digit division
Multi-digit decimal operations
Content Emphases by Cluster: Grade Four
Key: Major Clusters;
Clusters
Supporting Clusters;
Additional
45
Coherence: Link to Major Topics Across Grades
One of several staircases
to algebra designed in the
OA domain.
•
46
Application
•
Students can use appropriate concepts and procedures
for application even when not prompted to do so.
•
Teachers provide opportunities at all grade levels for
students to apply math concepts in “real world”
situations, recognizing this means different things in K5, 6-8, and HS.
•
Teachers in content areas outside of math, particularly
science, ensure that students are using grade-levelappropriate math to make meaning of and access
science content.
47
Real world application – Grade 4
Part A
Teachers outside of math use
grade-level-appropriate math
Part B
Part C
Part D
What are the Obstacles and
Opportunities of the
Common Core State Standards?
CCSS - Math
Processing the Shifts - Math
Math Shifts
Focus: Focus strongly where the
Standards focus.
Coherence: Think across
grades, and link to major topics
within grades.
Rigor: In major topics, pursue
conceptual understanding,
procedural skill and fluency, and
application with equal intensity.
What is the shift?
Why this shift?
Obstacles
Opportunities
SGOs and SMART goals
Typical Usage
of SMART
SGOs Must Be
SGOs Require a Teacher to
Specific
Describe how many students learn “what”
or grow by “how much”
M Measurable
Measurable
Compare starting points to ending points
using assessments of some type
A
Achievable
Ambitious but
Achievable
Determine a reasonable amount of growth
according to knowledge of students
R
Relevant
Relevant
Align SGOs to standards
T
Time-related
Time-related
Set an appropriate instructional period
S
Specific
How SMART is your SGO?
Resources
Welcome to the
Educator Resource Website!
What can I do?
Educator (teacher, principal,
supervisor, etc):
• Search for resources and/or
browse standards/model
curriculum to locate
instructional materials
• Upload a resource to share
with fellow educators and
general public
• Rate a resource and view
rating (only educators can
rate resources)
• Create a user profile with a
“my collections” feature to
store and organize favorite
resources
• Access on a mobile device
on IOS (Apple) and
Android devices.
• Share resources in social
media
NJDOE Website
Common Core &
Model Curriculum
ELA Appendices A, B, C
Common Core on the Go
•iPhone
•Android
www.achievethecore.org
Parent Roadmaps
K-8
ELA & Math
English & Spanish
Thank you
Kimberley Harrington
Director of Standards
NJ Department of Education
[email protected]

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