Slides 2 - Rabieramadan.org

Report
Rabie A. Ramadan
ra.ramadan@uoh.edu.sa
http://www.rabieramadan.org
http://www.rabieramadan.org/classes/2014-2015/micro/
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Do not think of the exam
−Just think of the class materials and how much you learn
from it
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Feel free to stop me at any time
−I do not care how much I teach in class as long as you
understand what I am saying
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There will be an interactive sessions
in class
 you solve some of the problems with my help
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When the time is up , just let me know….
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How many rows do we have in class?
How many of you attending?
How many of you in the first row ?
How many of you in the second row?
Take a number based on the following chart.
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Inside almost everything of our life a
microprocessor .

Robotino uses PC 104 board
− AMD G-Series Single Core T16R processor
− Up to 4GB
−SDRAM 128 MB
− Wireless LAN access point
−Compact flash card (256 MB) with
C++ API for controlling Robotino
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-
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The 8086 Registers
The 8086 Memory Addressing
The 8086 Memory Organization
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Data Registers:
−The data group consists of the AX, BX, CX & DX registers.
−Each one of these registers is 16-bit wide, but can be
accessed as a byte or a word.
Figure 1: Data Registers
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Pointer & Index Registers:
−The registers in this group are all 16-bits wide.
−They can not be accessed as a low or high byte.
−They are used as memory pointers.
−Register IP can not be accessed by the programmer and
has only one function that is to point to the next
instruction to be fetched by the CPU
Keywords:
- Stack
- Execution
cycle
Figure 2: Pointer and index registers.
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Example 1:
Referring to the next Fig 3, if SI=1000H, what is the
contents of register AH after executing the instruction
MOV AH, [SI]?
Figure 3: Memory map of Example 1
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
Example 1:
Referring to the next Fig 3, if SI=1000H, what is the
contents of register AH after executing the instruction
MOV AH, [SI]?
−AH = 26H
Move the contents
of memory
referred to it
by SI to the high
byte of the
Accumulator
Figure 3: Memory map of Example 1
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
Status & Control Flags:
−It is a 16-bit register
−Six of the flags are status indicators reflecting
the properties of the result of the last
arithmetic or logical instruction.
−The 8086 has several instructions that can be
used to transfer program control based on the
state of these flags, e.g.
 JNZ (jump on not zero),
 JZ (jump on zero).
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−Three of the flags can be set or reset
directly by the programmer:
 TF (trap flag), single step flag
 IF (interrupt flag), and
 DF (direction flag).
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Figure 4: Status and control flags.
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
Example 2:
If the register AL=7FH and the instruction ADD
AL, 1 is executed, what will be the content of
the AL register? What will be the values of the
status flags?
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Example 2:
If the register AL=7FH and the instruction ADD AL, 1 is
executed, what will be the content of the AL register?
What will be the values of the status flags?
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Segment Registers:
−These registers are used by the CPU to determine the
memory segment addresses.
−The function of these registers will be explained when
discussing the memory addressing.
Figure 5: Segment registers.
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Memory Space:
−The 8086 processor has 20-bit
address bus.
−This allows the processor to
address ??220 or 1,048,576
different memory locations (1
MB).
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Memory Addressing:
−the memory space is divided into
segments and
−the CPU is limited to accessing
program instructions and data
only from these segments.
Figure 6: The 8086 memory space.
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Memory Segments & Segment Registers:
−Within the 1MB memory space, the 8086 defines four
memory blocks each of size 64K
 Code Segment: holds the program instruction codes
 Data Segment: stores data for the program
 Extra Segment: holds extra data (e.g. shared data).
 Stack Segment: used to store interrupt and subroutine
return addresses.
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−The four segment
registers (CS, DS, ES, and
SS) are used to point to
the beginning of each
segment (i.e., location 0
or the base address) as
shown in Fig 7.
−The four segments need
not be defined
separately (i.e. they can
overlap) as shown in
Fig.8.
Figure 7: The 8086 memory segments.
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Figure 8: Overlapping of the 8086 memory segments.
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Segments and Offsets :
−A combination of a segment address and an
offset address accesses a memory location.
−All memory addresses must consist of a
segment address plus an offset address.
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−The segment address, located within one
of the segment registers,
−defines the beginning address of any
64K-byte memory segment.
−The offset address selects any location
within the 64K byte memory segment.
−All memory segments have a length of
64K bytes.
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Figure 9: The 8086 memory-addressing, using a segment address plus an offset.
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 Segments
and Offsets :
−Fig 9 shows how the segment plus
offset addressing scheme selects a
memory location.
 This illustration shows a memory
segment that begins at location
10000H and ends at location 1FFFFH
(64K bytes in length).
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It also shows how an offset address, sometimes
called a displacement, of F000H selects location
1F000H in the memory system.
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Note that the offset or displacement is the
From where you
gotshown
the extra
distance above the start of the segment, as
Zero?
in Fig 9.

The segment register contains 1000H, yet it
addresses a starting segment at location 10000H.
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Segments and Offsets :
−Note that Each segment registers is only
16 bits wide.
−However, the CPU must generate a 20-bit
memory address to access a location
within the first 1M of memory.
−It takes care of this by appending four 0’s
(0H)to the low order bits of the segment
register.
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This forms a 20-bit memory address, allowing it to
access the start of a segment.
−For example, when a segment register contains 1200H,
it addresses a 64K-byte memory segment beginning at
location 12000H.
−Likewise, if a segment register contains 1201H, it
addresses a memory segment beginning at location
12010H.

Because of the internally appended 0H, memory
segments can begin only at a 16-byte boundary (called a
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paragraph) in the memory system
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Segments and Offsets :
−Once the beginning address is
known, the ending address is found
by adding FFFFH (64K).
−For example, if a segment register
contains 3000H, the first address of
the segment is 30000H, and the last
address is or 3FFFFH.
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The following table shows several examples of
segment register contents and the starting and
ending addresses of the memory segments
selected by each segment address.
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Segments and Offsets :
−The offset address, which is a part of the address, is
added to the start of the segment to address a
memory location within the memory segment.
−For example, if the segment address is 1000H and the
offset address is 2000H, the microprocessor addresses
memory location 12000H.
−The offset address is always added to the starting
address of the segment to locate the data.
−The segment and offset address is sometimes
written as 1000:2000 for a segment address of 1000H
with an offset of 2000H.
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Default Segment and Offset Registers:
−The 8086 has a set of rules that apply to
segments whenever memory is addressed.
−These rules, define the segment register and
offset register combination.
−For example, the code segment register (CS)
is always used with the instruction pointer
(IP) to address the next instruction in a
program.
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The code segment register defines the start of the
code segment and the instruction pointer locates
the next instruction within the code segment.
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This combination (CS:IP) locates the next
instruction executed by the CPU.
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For example, if CS=1400H and IP=1200H , the
microprocessor fetches its next instruction from
memory location or 15200H.
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Default Segment and Offset Registers:
−Another default combinations is the stack.
−Stack data are referenced through the stack segment
register (SS) at the memory location addressed by
either the stack pointer (SP) or the pointer (BP).
−These combinations are referred to as SS:SP or SS:BP.
−For example, SS=2000H and BP=3000H , the CPU
addresses memory location 23000H for the stack
segment memory location.
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−Other defaults of segment and offset
combinations are shown in the following
table.
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Logical and Physical Addresses:
−Addresses within a segment can range from address 0
to address FFFFH.
−This corresponds to the 64K length of the segment.
−An address within a segment is called an offset, or
logical, address.
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−For example, logical address 0005H in a code
segment (CS= B3FF0H) actually corresponds to the
real address B3FF0H + 5 = B3FF5H.
−This "real" address is called the physical address.
−The physical address is 20 bits long and corresponds
to the actual binary code output by the CPU on the
address bus lines
−The logical address is an offset from location 0 of a
given segment.
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Example 3:
Calculate the beginning and ending addresses for the data
segment, assuming register DS=E000H.
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Example 3:
Calculate the beginning and ending addresses for the data
segment, assuming register DS=E000H.
−Starting Address = E0000H
−Ending Address = E0000 + 0FFFF = EFFFFH
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Example 4:
Calculate the physical address corresponding to logical
address D470H in the extra segment. Repeat for logical
address 2D90H in the stack segment. Assume the segment
Definitions ES= 52B9H and SS= 5D27H.
−Calculating the Physical Address of D470H
−Physical Address = 52B90 + 0D470 = 60000H
−Calculating the Physical Address of 2D90H
−Physical Address = 5D270 + 2D90 = 60000H
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The memory is organized as
two banks (Even Bank and
Odd Bank)
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This allows the processor to
access one word (two
bytes) through its 16-bit
data bus.
Figure 9: The 8086 memory banks.
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To: ra.ramadan@uoh.edu.sa
Subject : Micro Assignment 1
Attachment : word/pdf
Do not forgot your name.
Q1: Calculate the beginning and ending addresses for the data
segment, assuming register DS=E100H.
Q2: what is the content of the interrupt bit when the following
code is executed:
main (){
int I =0;
Math.Pow(5,2);
}
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Q3:
If the register AL=77H and the instruction ADD
AL, 1 is executed, what will be the content of
the AL register? What will be the values of the
status flags?
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Q4: Write a survey about different methods to
measure the performance of any processor. (2
pages max) ?
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