6B PPTX - Missouri Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support

Report
“Instead of calling my mom, how would you feel
about exploring a more positive and preventive strategy?”
MO SW POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT
MU Center for SW-PBS
College of Education
University of Missouri
Working Agreements
Be Respectful
• Be an active listener—open to new ideas
Be Responsible
• Silence cell phones—reply appropriately
3
Today’s Outcome
 Provide an introduction to
Schoolwide Positive Behavior
Support (SW-PBS) and its essential
components.
MO SW-PBS
Responsibility…
Safe
Predictable
A First Step to Address This
Responsibility
Establishing a positive, proactive school-wide
discipline plan is a necessary first step for
enabling schools to achieve their goals and
responsibilities.
Colvin, 2007
MO SW-PBS
What Is SW-PBS?
Framework
Research and Evidence Based Practices
Academics and Behavior Outcomes
For All Students
A Brief History
Late
1980’s
Univ. of
Oregon
MO SW-PBS
1999 –
National
Center
funded
2000-01
Missouri
state
initiative
started
with Dr.
Lewis, MU,
and DESE
2006 –
DESE
begins
funding
additional
MO SWPBS Staff
2012-13
Over 750
Missouri
Schools
Co-Directors of the National PBIS Center
MO SW-PBS
Systems, Data, and Practices
OUTCOMES
Supporting
Data
Decision
Making
Supporting
Staff Behavior
PRACTICES
Note: Copyright 2002 by the Center on
Positive Behavioral Interventions and
Supports, University of Oregon. Reprinted
with permission.
MO SW-PBS
Supporting
Student Behavior
Three Levels of Implementation
A Continuum of Support for All
Academic Systems
Behavioral Systems
Tier Three
Tier Three
• Individual Students
• Assessment-based
• High Intensity
• Individual Students
• Assessment-based
• Intense, durable procedures
Tier Two
• Some students (at-risk)
• High efficiency
• Rapid response
Tier Two
Universal
• Some students (at-risk)
• High efficiency
• Rapid response
Tier One
Tier One
• All students
• Preventive, proactive
• All settings, all students
• Preventive, proactive
MO SW-PBS
Eight Essential Components
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Common Philosophy & Purpose
Leadership
Clarifying Expected Behavior
Teaching Expected Behavior
Encouraging Expected Behavior
Discouraging Inappropriate Behavior
Ongoing Monitoring
Effective Classroom Practices
MO SW-PBS
Component 1
Common Purpose and Approach
to Discipline
Mission
Vision
Beliefs
CSIP
Component 2
Leadership
•Administrative Support
•Building Leadership Team
•Train the Trainer
MO SW-PBS
Component 3
Clear Set of Positive Expectations and
Behaviors
 Provides Consistency in Language
 Provides Consistency in What To Teach
 Provides Consistency in What to Recognize
 Provides Consistency in What to Correct
Tree…..5 points each
Play equipment…5 points each
People…4 points each
Pond…4 points
Sign…10 points
Parking Lot…10 points
Cars…25 points each
Bench…25 points each
Component 3
Clear Set of Positive Expectations and
Behaviors
• Develop 3 to 5 expectations
• Create a schoolwide expectations matrix
• Develop classroom rules that align with schoolwide
expectations
• Communicate expectations to all stakeholders
MO SW-PBS
WONDERFUL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Be Safe
All Settings
Classroom
Bus
Hallway
Cafeteria
Bathroom
Playground
Keep hands &
feet to self
Stay in seat
Remain
seated
Walk
Report
spills
Walk
Use
equipment
as
instructed
Be where you
belong
Maintain
personal
space
Be Respectful Use kind word Raise hand for
help
Be
Responsible
Follow
directions
Use materials
as instructed
Keep school
neat & clean
Face
forward
Banisters
are for
hands
Face
forward in
line
Wash hands
with soap &
water
Stay in
approved
areas
Keep the
bus clean
Walk
quietly
Eat only
your food
Give others
privacy
Take turns
Take all your
belongings
Return to
class
promptly
Clean up
after
yourself
Follow
bathroom
procedures
Be a
problem
solver
Be a good
listener
Be prepared
Watch for
your stop
What Makes a Matrix Reliable?
•
•
•
•
•
Observable
Measureable
Positively Stated
Understandable
Always Applicable
MO SW-PBS
Does This Meet OMPUA Guidelines?
1. Put trash in bins.
2. Do your best.
3. Clean up after yourself.
4. Be a high achiever.
5. Be in seat when bell rings.
Clear Set of Positive Expectations and
Behaviors--Examples
Component 4
Procedures for Teaching Expected Behaviors
The Science of Behavior
Has Taught Us…
• Students are not born with bad behaviors.
• To learn better ways of behaving, students must
be directly taught the replacement behaviors.
• To retain new behaviors, students must be given
specific, positive feedback and opportunities to
practice in a variety of settings.
Classroom Procedures and Routines
INSTRUCTION
MISBEHAVIOR
CLIMATE
Component 5
Continuum of Procedures for
Encouraging Expected Behaviors
S. P. F.
Positive Feedback
You have just earned yourself a Cat Track. You
were walking in the hallway. That is being safe.
You got it Sarah!!
I like the way you did that. Good job!
Earning a Tangible
F
Classroom Continuum of Strategies
Free & Frequent
Short Term
Long Term
Verbal Praise
Token Economy
Group Contingency
Smile
Phone Calls
Field Trip
Stickers
Special Privileges
Special Project
Rubber Stamps
Computer Time
Recognition
Thumbs up
Social/Free Time
Ceremonies
Home Notes
Special Seat
F
Acknowledge & Recognize
F
Component 6
Discouraging Inappropriate Behavior
• It is important and necessary to
respond to problem behaviors
• Often provides a “teachable
moment”
• Tell them what they are doing
• Tell them the expectation
• Have them tell you
• Have them show you
MO SW-PBS
Discouraging Inappropriate
Behavior
• All staff need to have a common
understanding of what is considered minor
and what is major problem behavior
MO SW-PBS
Clarifying Roles for Discouraging
Classroom Managed - Minor
•Out of seat
•Talking out, off-task
•Violation of class rules
•Inappropriate language
•Lack of material
•Gum
•Disrespect
•Cheating
•Tardies
•Minor Destruction of Property
Office Managed - Major
•Truancy
•Threatening student or adult
•Fighting
•Refusal to go to or Disruptive
in Buddy Room
•Sexual harassment
•Weapons
•Drugs, cigarettes, tobacco,
alcohol
•Assault—physical or verbal
Office Discipline Referral Form
•
•
•
•
•
•
Student name
Referring staff name
Date of incident
Time of incident
Location of incident
Inappropriate behavior with designation of
office-managed or staff-managed
• Others involved
• Possible motivation
• Administrative decision/action
MO SW-PBS
Component 7
Ongoing Monitoring
• Develop a system to collect,
summarize and analyze data
• Multiple data sources are
used– i. e. ODRs, surveys,
observations
• Leadership Team uses data to
make decisions
• Leadership Team regularly
shares data with staff
MO SW-PBS
The “Big Five” Report
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
How frequent?
When?
Where?
What?
Who?
MO SW-PBS
Office Re fe rrals pe r Day pe r M onth
A v e R efer r als per D ay
Last Year and This Year
20
15
10
5
0
Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
School Months
Apr
May
Jun
N um ber of R efer r als
Re fe rrals by Tim e of Day
50
40
30
20
10
0
7 : 0 0 7 : 3 0 8 : 0 0 8 : 3 0 9 : 0 0 9 : 3 0 1 0 : 0 01 0 : 3 01 1 : 0 01 1 : 3 01 2 : 0 01 2 : 3 0 1 : 0 0 1 : 3 0 2 : 0 0 2 : 3 0 3 : 0 0 3 : 3 0
Time of Day
N um ber of O ffic e R efer r als
Re fe rrals by Location
80
60
40
20
0
B ath R B us A
B us
C af
C lass C omm
Gym
H all
School Locations
Libr
P lay G S pec
Other
Referrals Per Problem Behavior
Re fe rrals by Tim e of Day
Office Referrals per Day per M onth
N um ber of R efer r als
A v e R efer r a l s p er D a y
Last Year and This Year
20
15
10
5
0
Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
30
20
10
80
60
40
20
B ath R B us A
B us
C af
C lass C omm
Gym
7 : 0 0 7 : 3 0 8 : 0 0 8 : 3 0 9 : 0 0 9 : 3 0 1 0 : 0 01 0 : 3 01 1 : 0 01 1 : 3 01 2 : 0 01 2 : 3 0 1 : 0 0 1 : 3 0 2 : 0 0 2 : 3 0 3 : 0 0 3 : 3 0
Time of Day
Re fe rrals by Location
0
12:00
Number of Referrals
N um ber of O ffic e R efer r als
40
0
School Months
H all
Libr
P lay G S pec
Other
Referrals by Type of Problem Behavior
50
40
30
20
10
0
Lang AcholArsonBombCombsDefianDisruptDressAgg/fgtTheftHarassProp D Skip TardyTobacVand Weap
Lang.
School Locations
Defiance
Cafeteria Class Commons
MO SW-PBS
Referrals by Student
50
Hall
Disrespect
Harass
Skip
Component 8
Effective Classroom Practices
MO SW-PBS
Engagement time
Classroom Expectations
Classroom Procedures & Routines
Encouraging Expected Behavior
Discouraging Inappropriate Behavior
Active Supervision
Opportunities to Respond
Activity Sequencing & Choice
Task Difficulty
Instructional time
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Investing in Prevention is Associated
With:
•
•
•
•
Decreased Office Discipline Referrals
Increased student and staff attendance
Decreased referrals to special education
Increased targeted & individual intervention
effectiveness
• Increased student perception of school safety
• Improved academic performance
• Improved faculty/staff retention
In Summary
What does School-Wide PBS look like?
• >80% of students can tell you what is expected of them
& give behavioral example because they have been taught,
actively supervised, practiced, & acknowledged.
• Positive adult-to-student interactions exceed negative
• Function based behavior support is foundation for
addressing problem behavior.
• Data- & team-based action planning & implementation
are operating.
• Administrators are active participants.
• Full continuum of behavior support is available to all
students
MO SW-PBS

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