Presentation-Soheil-Shayegh

Report
Assessing the Electric
Vehicles Supply Equipment
(EVSE, charging station) in
Georgia
Soheil Shayegh
Enterprise Innovation Institute
Background
• Atlanta:
– No. 2 in Electric Vehicle (EV)
adoption
– Biggest US market for Nissan
Leaf sales
• Incentives:
– $5,000 state tax credit
– $7,500 federal tax credit
• Opportunity:
– 80% of EVs in five metro
Atlanta counties
Technology
Economy
Policy
Technology
EV Charging Timeline
2011:
2009:
1994-2000:
Inductive charging
standard SAE-J1772
SAE Combined
Charging System
(Combo Coupler)
introduced
GM inductive
MagneCharge for
home charging
2010:
SAE-J1772 adopted
by GM, Chrysler,
Ford, Toyota, Honda,
Nissan and Tesla
2010:
The CHΛdeMO
standard developed
in Japan.
2012:
Audi, BMW, Daimler, Ford,
General Motors, Porsche
and Volkswagen agreed to
introduce Combo Coupler
Technology
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Technology
Source: http://www.mpoweruk.com/infrastructure.htm
Technology
Charging Type
Charging
option
Capacity
Equipment
Range
Level 1
120 VAC, 15 or
20 amps
A cord: standard, threeprong household plug
and a J1772 standard
connector
2-5 miles per hour of
charging
Level 2
240-280 VAC,
J1772-connector
20 or 100 amps
10-20 miles per hour
of charging
Level 3
DC fast charge
480 VAC, 125
amps
30 min to charge 80%
battery
off-board charger to
provide the AC to DC
conversion
Source: Installation Guide For Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE), The Massachusetts Department of
Energy Resources, 2011
Technology
Charging time and Range Anxiety
• Range Anxiety:
 Battery swapping
• Tesla (90 sec, every
supercharging station, $60)
• Issues:
– customer trust,
– battery ownership
 Free loaner
Economy
Economic Analysis
for adoption of 1,000 EVs
• Methodology:
– Input-output model for
economic impact
– IMPLAN software
$12,000,000
$10,000,000
$8,000,000
$6,000,000
$4,000,000
$2,000,000
• Assumptions:
– Loss of earnings at gas stations
– Tax credit added to income
– Savings on fuel spending
$0
Output
($2,000,000)
Fuel spending removed from gas stations
Fuel saving added to household income
Federal tax added to household income
Net Impact
Economy
Economic Impact
(per 1000 EVs)
Economic Impact
Activity
Direct monetary
Employment
Income
Output
Fuel spending removed
from gas stations
($1,547,000)
-3.4
($128,254)
($303,320)
Fuel saving added to
household income
$1,547,000
14
$624,685
$1,818,910
Federal tax added to
household income
$7,500,000
67.7
$3,028,533
$8,818,244
$7,500,000
78
$3,524,964
$10,333,834
Net Impact
Policy
EV charging stations in Georgia
• Current status:
– 216 stations, 472
charging outlets
• Locations:
– Downtown areas
– State Routes and
Interstates
Sources:
www.afdc.energy.gov
www.plugincars.com
Policy
Macon
Augusta
Savannah
Columbus
Ranges:
Nissan Leaf: 84 miles
Tesla Roadstar: 200 miles
Source: www.plugshare.com
Policy
Policy Recommendations
• Potential locations:
– Workplace charging
• Public access:
– Designated parking
– Visitor attraction
• Zoning codes:
– Permitting process
• Maintenance
– 3rd Party Risk
Acknowledgement
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Greg Crittenden, Metro Plug-In
Don Francis, Clean Cities Georgia
Ben Echols, Georgia Power
Charles Huling, Strategic energy Institute, GT
Ben Hill, Enterprise Innovation Institute, GT
Brian Stockton, City of Woodstock, GA
Ruthie Norton, City of Atlanta, GA

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