Chapter 8

Report
Chapter 8
Social Media Information
Systems
“Nobody Is Going to See Pictures of You
in Your PJs on Your Treadmill”
• PRIDE – patients exercise at home and still
have a group experience
• Members’ performance displayed on cell
phone
• Will technology support application?
• Will elderly patients use it?
• Will it increase motivation?
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-2
Sample PRIDE Screen Shot
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-3
Study Questions
Q1: What is a social media information system (SMIS)?
Q2: How does SMIS advance organizational strategy?
Q3: How does SMIS increase social capital?
Q4: What roles do SMIS play in the hyper-social
organization?
Q5: Does mobility impact social media economics?
Q6: How can organizations manage social media risks?
Q7: 2023?
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-4
Q1: What Is a Social Media Information
System (SMIS)?
• Social media (SM)
– Use of IT to support sharing content
among networks of users
– Enables communities, tribes, or hives
– Related by a common interest
• Social media information system (SMIS)
– Supports sharing of content among
networks of users
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-5
SMIS: Convergence of Disciplines
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-6
SMIS Organizational Roles
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-7
Community/
Social Media
Site
Relationship
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-8
Social Media Sponsors: Not Casual
Commitment
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-9
Social Media Application Providers
• Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google
create the features and functions of the site
• Free to users
• Sponsors may or may not pay a fee
• Most earn revenue through some type of
advertising model
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-10
Components of SMIS
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-11
Q2: How Do SMIS Advance
Organizational Strategy?
• Defenders of Belief
– Share a common belief
– Seek conformity
– Want to convince others
– Facilitate activities like sales and
marketing
– Form strong bonds and allegiance to an
organization
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-12
Q2: How Does SMIS Advance
Organizational Strategy? (cont’d)
• Seekers of the Truth
– Share common desire to learn
something, solve a problem, make
something happen
– Seldom form a strong bond
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-13
SM in Value Chain Activities
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-14
Social Media and the Sales and
Marketing Activity
• Relationships between organizations and
customers emerge in a dynamic process
• Each customer crafts relationship
• Blogs, discussion lists, FAQ, user reviews
and commentary, other dynamic content
• Customers likely to generate most business
get most attention
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-15
Social Media and Customer Service
• Product users help each other solve
problems
• Selling to or through developer networks
most successful
• Risk loss of control
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-16
Social Media and Manufacturing and
Operations
•
•
•
•
Crowdsourcing
Enterprise 2.0
Folksonomy
SLATES
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-17
McAffee's SLATES Enterprise 2.0 Model
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-18
Q3: How Do SMIS Increase Social
Capital
1. Information
2. Influence
3. Social credentials
4. Personal reinforcement
– Value of social capital
 Number of relationships, strength of
relationships, and resources controlled
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-19
How Do Social Networks Add Value to
Businesses?
Progressive organizations:
– Maintain a presence on Facebook,
LinkedIn, Twitter, and other SN sites.
– Encourage customers and interested
parties to leave comments.
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-20
Using Social Networking to Increase the
Number of Relationships
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-21
Using Social Networks to Increase the
Strength of Relationships
• Three ways to increase social capital
1. Ask for a favor
2. Frequent interactions strengthen
relationships
3. Connect to those with more assets
• Social Capital = NumberRelationships x
RelationshipStrength x EntityResources
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-22
InClass Exercise 8: Computing Your
Social Capital
• Social capital is not an abstract concept.
• It applies to you.
• You and your classmates are accumulating
social capital now.
• What is the value of that capital?
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-23
Q4: What Roles Do SMIS Play In the
Hypersocial Organization
• Create communities to transform interactions with
customers, employees, and partners into mutually
satisfying relationships.
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-24
SEAMS Dynamic Process Activities
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-25
How Can SMIS Foster Hypersocial
Organizations?
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-26
Ethics Guide: Hiding the Truth?
• How is social networking different in
business than in private life?
• Do the ethics vary between private and
business use of social networking?
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-27
Q5: Does Mobility Affect Social Media
Economics?
Key Characteristics of Web 2.0
1. Users can respond directly to Web ads by
clicking on them.
– Pay per click revenue
2. Free content and free software
3. Thin-client browser applications and Software
as a Service (SaaS)
4. Use increases value
5. Mashups
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-28
Does Mobility Reduce Online Ad
Revenue?
• Google generated $7 from each smartphone
and about $30 from each desktop. (2012)
• By 2016, 25% of world’s population will have
two or more mobile devices.
• Average click-through rate of smartphones
4.12% and 2.39% for PCs. (per thousand)
– Facebook earned $9.86 on mobile ads
and $3.62 on Web ads.
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-29
Does Mobility Reduce Online Ad
Revenue? (cont'd)
• Conversion rate is more than twice as high
on PCs as on smartphones, 5.2% to 2.0%.
• Easy to measure click and conversion rates
by type of mobile device.
– Android users are far more likely to click
and convert on Facebook ads than
iPhone users
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-30
Q6: How Can Organizations Manage Social
Media Risks?
Managing Risk of Employee Communication
– Three Pillars of Social Organizations
 Disclose
 Protect
 Use Common Sense
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-31
Intel’s Rules of Social Media
Engagement
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-32
Managing the Risk of User-Generated
Content
Sources of Problems
• Junk and crackpot contributions
• Inappropriate content
• Unfavorable reviews
• Mutinous movements
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-33
Responding to Social Networking
Problems
1.
2.
3.

Leave it
Respond to it
Delete it
Deal with problematic content before
engaging in social media.
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-34
Q7: 2023?
• Liberal BYOD policies
• Vendors lose control of customer relationships
• Employees craft own relationships with employers
• Harness power of social behavior of employees and
partners to advance your strategy
• Employers provide endoskeleton to support work of
people on exterior
• Mobility + cloud + social media mean fascinating
opportunities for your nonroutine cognitive skills
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-35
Guide: Social Recruiting
• Employees sharing personal information on
SN
• Technology blurs line between work life and
home life
• Work is portable and always on
• Be careful about what you say
• Work networks are not social networks
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-36
Guide: Social Recruiting (cont’d )
• Organizations use communities to locate prospects
• Get a sense of candidate to find any potential
behavior or attitude problems
• Exposing protected data illegal to use for hiring
decisions
• Treat every candidate the same
• Join LinkedIn, use Google+ circles
• Keep personal social data out of any circle that can
be publicly accessed
• Social media a double-edged sword
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-37
Guide: Blending the Personal and
the Professional
• Employees sharing personal information
• Technology blurs line between work life and
home life
• Work is portable and always on
• You need to be more careful about what you
say
• Work networks are not social networks
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-38
Active Review
Q1: What is a social media information system (SMIS)?
Q2: How does SMIS advance organizational strategy?
Q3: How does SMIS increase social capital?
Q4: What roles do SMIS play in the hyper-social
organization?
Q5: Does mobility impact social media economics?
Q6: How can organizations manage social media risks?
Q7: 2023?
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-39
Case Study 8: Sedona Social
• Suppose Sedona Chamber of Commerce
hired you as manager of community social
media
• Want you to provide advice and assistance
to local businesses in development of social
media sites and manage CoC’s social media
presence
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-40
Copyright © 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal
8-41

similar documents