Universities

Report
NACEP Conference
October 24-26, 2003
School-college Partnerships in
Japan: A new strategy for
improving Japanese education
Midori Yamagishi
Center for R&D in Higher Education
Hokkaido University
Outline
1) Introduction
- Structural Changes in Japanese Society
- Educational Reforms since ‘90
2) School-College Partnerships in Japan
- A Crisis of “Entrance Examination System”
- Growing S-C partnerships in Japan
- S-C partnership activities at HU
3) Towards the possibility of a CEP in Japan
- Similarities and Differences in S-C Partnerships
in US and Japan
- How to do it in Japan?
4) Conclusion
3
Structural Changes
in Japanese Society
1. Rapidly aging society
Population
2. Service Economy
Labor
3. Individualistic Society
Value-orientation
4
Educational Reforms since ’90s
1. Higher Education
- Deregulation on establishing universities
- Emphasis on Teaching
- External Evaluation
- Strengthening Research
<Ability to pursue one’s own ends >
2. Elementary-Secondary Education
- 5-day school week
- Fostering “Ikiru-chikara” (Zest for living)
- Curriculum Reform (1993, 2003)
<Ability for independent learning and
thinking>
5
Reform of Continuity between
primary and secondary education
and higher education (1999)
1. Education based on cultivating
ability to purse one’s own ends and
the “ability for independent learning
and thinking”
2. Strengthening cooperation between
high schools and colleges/universities
3. Revising entrant selection systems
by placing importance on continuity
7
Declining Academic Standards
While the % of Japanese high
school students pursuing
higher education increased,
their learning ability and
motivation has been declining
significantly.
Why?
9
Trends in Enrollments in Japanese
Universities and Junior Colleges
(%)
40
35
30
25
University
Jr. College
20
15
10
5
0
1955 1960 1970 1980 1990 1998
Rate of Entering Higher Education
1999
2001
Miscellane
ous School
15.0%
20.0%
61.4%
48.7%
64.4%
48.5%
Colleges &
Universities
Rate of Graduation and Dropout
from High School
97.4%
86.5%
Dropout
2.6%
Dropout
13.5%
White:91.8%
Black:83.7%
Academic High School Curriculum
No. of Credits Required for Graduation
100
85
85
85
85
85
80
80
74
80
68
60
47
45
40
38
43
38
38
29
30
29
31
34
32
20
20
15
16
0
1948
1951
1956
1963
1973
1982
Total Course Credits Required
Credits in Required Courses
Credits in Required Courses in Japanese, Social Studies,
Science, & Mathematics
1994
2003
Study Time outside of classroom
(%)
40.0
1979
1997
35.0
30.0
25.0
20.0
15.0
10.0
5.0
0.0
None
~30 mnts
30 – 60
1 –2 hrs
(n=1375 H.S. Seniors from 11 high schools in
Two Prefectures)
2 – 3 hrs
3 –4 hrs
over 4 hrs
(Kariya、2000)
Entrance Examination System
・ Shifting from “the Selection by the
universities” to “a Mutual Choice
by the applicants and the
universities”
・The impact of the diversification of
selection methods and criteria
are questionable.
14
Trends of Entrants to Colleges &
Universities in Japan
10,000s
% of successful
Applicants
% of new H.S. graduates
Applying to Colleges & Univs.
Population
of 18 yrs old
C&U Entering Rate
H.S. Graduates
Entrants to
Showa
colleges and Universities
Heisei
Types of Test Requirements Public Universities
(based on the number of allocated slots, 2000)
NFSAT
+
One subject
NFSAT only
Others
NFSAT
+
Interview,
Essay
13.0% 3.4% 21.5%
NFSAT
+
4subject
NFSAT
+
2 subjects
14.2%
24.2%
NFSAT
+
3 subjects
19.3%
4.4%
Secondary Ed.⇒ Higher Ed.
Hokkaido U.
PSU
Entrance Exam.
AO
12
11
10
9
|
SATI/ACT
College Entrance
Exit Exams.
Requirements
(CAM)
English(4 yrs)
CIM:
Math(3 yrs)
(6 areas) Science(2 yrs)
8
Soc. Studies (3 yrs)
Foreign Lang.(2
yrs)
5
Zenki
Koki
First-Stage Test
3
2
High School
1
Entrance Exam
Compulsory Education
Junior High School (3)
Elementary School (6)
3
K
Average Study Time outside of classroom
(H.S. Sophomores by post-H.S. plans)
(mnts)
180
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
1979
1997
142.3
106.8
102.0
82.1
63.8
56.5
40.4
39.3
25.8
12.6
Work
Miscellaneous
Schools
Junior
Colleges
Universities
Universities
(Private)
(Public)
(n=1375 from 11 high schools in two Prefectures)
(Kariya、
Average Study Time outside of classroom
(H.S. Sophomores by Application Type)
(mnts)
140
120
131.5
Regular
一般受験
Nominated
推薦入学
94.8
100
89.5
85.9
80
60
46.7
41.5
40
33
29.1
20
0
Miscellaneous
Junior
Schools
Colleges
Universities
Universities
(Private)
(Public)
(n=1375 from 11 high schools in two Prefectures)
Kariya、2000)
Education System in USA
Higher Education
Junior & senior High School
Elementary School
Japanese Education System
Higher Education
High School
Junior High School
Elementary School
S-C partnerships in Japan
1. Open Campus, College Day
2. Faculty Lectures at High
Schools
3. High School students’ attending
college classes
(Regular and Extension classes)
4. H.S. Seniors’ seminar linked
with college admission
5. College Remedial courses
taught by high school teachers
22
The Number of School-College
Partnership Programs in Japan
No. of H.S.
900
800
700
programs granting
high school credits
600
528
500
455
400
300
200
113
15
22
100
0
1999
68
49
117
2000
2001
184
2002
257
2003 (planned)
Providing College Information by
College Faculty at High schools
N of
H.S.
1400
1200
1000
800
600
400
200
0
2000
2001
2003
Fourth National Survey of School-College Partnerships
Most Frequently Named Program Models
Model
Tech Prep
TRIO Programs
GEAR UP
Project Advance (Syracuse University)
Holmes Group
America Reads
Professional Development School
School-to-Work
National Writing Project
Times Named
68
33
14
10
9
8
8
8
6
Fourth National Survey of School-College Partnerships
General Classification
90%
78%
60%
47%
30%
27%
27%
Curriculum
Restructuring
24%
0%
Student Programs Educator Programs
Other
Fourth National Survey of School-College Partnerships
Most Frequently Selected Foci
Focus
School Professional Development
Enrichment for school students
At-risk students
Minority students
Career exploration for school students
Academic alliances
Teacher pre-service
Internships for college students
Mentoring school students
Tutoring school students
#
%
520
499
493
407
377
368
330
318
308
300
27.8
26.7
26.3
21.8
20.1
19.7
17.6
17.0
16.6
16.0
Purposes of the S-C Partnerships
1.College/Universities
1) Reducing wrong choices of college/Major
2) Drawing attention to particular majors
3) Recruiting better students
4) Securing applicants
5) Familiarize with H.S. curriculum & teaching
methods
2. High Schools
1) Improving Students’ learning motivation
2) Helping students clarify post-high school
planes
3) Early exposure to academic disciplines
4) Getting college experience
5) A part of “Integrated Study”
6) Improving teaching
28
Hokkaido University
1) A Public Research University
(One of the seven Old Imperial
Universities)
2) 12 Colleges & Schools, 3 Research
Institutes, 13 Research
Centers,・・・
3) 11,000 undergraduates, 5,000
grad. 4,500 Faculty and Staff
29
Starts of S-C Partnerships
1. Ministry of Ed. Grants: start-up program for
enhancing science & engineering majors:
1994: Math not taught at HS.
1996: Techno-Orienteering for HS students
2. Requests for “College Day from neighboring H.S.s
1992: Science, 1996 Education, Engineering,
1997: 9 schools & Colleges, 1999 Open Univ.
3. Ministry of Ed.’s proposal for Higher education
to commit for life long education
30
Towards the possibility of a CEP
in Japan
College–level
Program
CEP
College Programs
IB
AP
Japan
○
Some
started
△
×
31
32
S-C Partnership activities at HU
(I-T)
Hokkaido U.
H.S. Guidance
Division
H.S. students
& Parents
HU Seminar
in Hokkaido (4 cities)
HU Seminar
Outside
Hokkaido
(2 cities)
H.S. visits
・SSH
・Chem. Seminar
・Science Club
Annual Meeting
・Extension
Open University
Summer College
Campus Tour
Past
present
HU guidance
Seminar at
H.S.by faculty
or grad.
students
Thank you for your attention
Thank you for your attention
Public High School Education
Historical
Roles
USA
Comprehensive
Curriculum
Duration
Entrance
Examination
3~4 years
No
Exit Exam.
Many States
Japan
Preparation for
College Ed.
3 years
Yes
(Entering Rate:96%)
No
College Admissions
USA(Public)
Entrance
Exam
No
Application
Period
Several months
Japan
Yes (Multiple)
7 to 10 days
Admission Applicant Types
Exam Dates
Categories Freshman、Transfer、 Nomination、AO、
Others(Minority,
Athletes,International
)
Regular(2~3回)
Applicant Types
Returnees、
International、
Adults、Transfers
Freshman Admission
PSU
Requirements
・Graduating H.S.
with GPA > 2.5
・SAT-I/ACT
・Fulfilling College
Entrance Requirements
(14units)
English(4 years)
Math(3 years)
Science(2 years)
Social Studies(2
years)
Foreign Language*
(2 years or
demonstrated
proficiency)
Hokudai
・Completing H.S.
or equivalent
curriculum
・
Freshman Admission (Cont.)
PSU
Selection SAT-I(ACT)*HGPA
Criteria
Hokudai
Varies among
Entering Units
(Faculty, Areas )
① AO
Essay, Interviews
②Regular I(written
tests only)
FSAT(6/7 subjects)
+ Hokudai written
Test (3/5
subjects)
③Regular II(Mixed)
FSAT+ Hokudai
written test、Essay、
Interview)
Freshman Admission (Cont.)
Hokudai
・Varies among
Admission ・ Probability of
getting GPA
Policies
entering units or
>2.0
areas
at the end of the
・Reflected on the
first year
weights assigned to
・Diversity of
the subjects tested
students body
・Ranking of the
total score
PSU
Appeal
Yes
No
The School System in the Republic of Korea
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
25
24
1. Teacher’s college
2. Junior vocational colleges
3. Correspondence college
4. Open college
5. Miscellaneous schools (college level)
6. Higher trade schools
7. Miscellaneous schools (high-school level)
8. Trade schools
9. Higher civic schools
10. miscellaneous schools (middle-school level)
11. Civic schools
Graduate
schools
23
22
21
20
Universities and
college
19
1
2
3
4
Higher
education
5
18
17
16
High schools
6
Secondary
education
7
15
14
13
Middle schools
8 9 10
12
11
10
11
Primary schools
Primary
education
9
8
7
6
5
4
Kindergartens
FRANCE
UNIVERSITY EDUCATION
NON‐UNIVERSITY
EDUCATION
19
18
17
16
GENERAL AND/OR
TECHNOLO GICAL
LYCÉE(2)
VOCATIONAL LYCÉE(3)
APPRENTICESHIP
ALTERRATINGTRAINING(4)
15
14
13
GENERAL
EDUCATION
COLLÉGE(1)
12
11
COMPULSORY10
EDUCATION 9
8
PRIMARY SCHOOL
(ECOLE ELEMENTAIRE)
7
6
5
4
3
2
NURSERY SCHOOL
(ECOLEMATERNELLE)
TECHNOLOGICAL
EDUCATION
GERMANY
Education System and Qualification Structure
Habilitation
DOKTOR
Lizentiat/ zweites
staatsexamen/
Aufbaustudium
Diplom/Madister Artium/
Erstes Staatsexamen
UNIVERSITAT/
GESAMTHOCHSCHULE
Specialist
Diploma
Diplom(FH)
Vordiplom/
Zwischenprüfung/
Grundstudium
FACHHOCHSCHULE
UNIVERSITAT/
GESAMTHOCHSCHULE
Abitur
4
3
2
1
Abitur
13
13
12
12
11
11
10
9
8
7 GYMNASIUM
6
5
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
HOHERE
FACHSCHULE/
AKADEMIE
DIplom
Berufsakademia
4
3
2
1
BERUFSAKADEMIE
EMPLOYMEN
FAchhochschulreife/
Professional
Certificate
Fachgebundenes
Abitur
BERUFLICHES
GYMNASIUM
Facharbeiter/
Abschlusszeugnis
FACHSCHULE
BERUFSFACHSC
HULE
BERUFSSCHULE
Mittlere Reife
Realschulabschluss
GESAMTSCHULE
10
9
8
7
6
5
GRUNDSCULE
REALSCHULE
Hauptschulabschluss
9
8
7
6
5
HAUPTSHULE
UNITED STATES
UNITED KINGDOM
School Grades 1-11(age 516)
School Grades 1-12 (age 517)
At Age 16 GCSE
School ‘Sixth Form’ - 2 years
University Freshman Year
‘A’ level at age 18
Sophomore Year
University 1st Year
Junior year
2nd Year
Senior Year and Graduation
3rd Year and Graduation
Where did the Class of 1999 Go After Graduation?
College fall
term: 67
4-year
college:
41
College:
70
Our-of-state 4-year
college: 13
Oregon 4-year
college: 28
Independent
college: 4
OUS: 24
College winter
term: 3
Out of 100
high school
graduates
13 plan to
transfer to
OUS later
Oregon community
college:26
2-year
college
or voc:
29
Definitely enroll later: 8
No College:
30
Probably enroll later: 6
Will not enroll: 16
Oregon private
vocational: 26
Our-of-state
two-year: 2
High School Offering College-Level Learning,2000-2001
Table H-1
High School Offering College-Level Learning, 2000-2001
High Schools
Offering
College Level
Learning
2000-2001
Running
Start
Advanced
Placement
Internationa
l
Baccalaureat
e
97%
62%
4%
College in
The High
School
Tech
Prep
28%
82%
Table H-2
11 th and 12 th Graders Enrolled, 2000-2001
Running
Start
11th and 12th
Graders
Enrolled,
2000-2001
10%
Advanced
Placement
~13%
Internationa
l
Baccalaureat
e
Not
Available
College in
The High
School
< 2%
Tech
Prep
~
15%
Barbara Mchain & Thompson,M.
“Educational Opportunities in Washington’s High Schools Under State
Education Reform : High School Responses to Expectation for Chye.” 2001
Population :3,400,00
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
Articulation of secondary and higher Ed. In USA
Enrollments in Higher Edcation
Enrollments in
Secondary Education
Elite stage
Massification
~15%
Stage (15~
50%)
1910 Elite stage
~15%
Ascription,
Talents,Merit
Massification
1930 Stage (15~
50%)
Achievement・
Talent
Meritocracy
Universal stage
50%~
Certificate
Meritocracy+
Equal
opportunities
Universal
stage
50%~
Individual
Choices,
motivation
Equal attainment
(Arai, 1999)
56
多様な高大連携教育の展開
1.オープンキャンパス、体験入学
2.大学教員の出張講義
3.高校の課外活動として大学の授業や
公開講座を聴講する
4.大学の正規の授業を受講
5. 入試連動型
6.大学の補習授業を高校教員が担当
57
北大への外圧
1.「理科離れ」対策のための政府助成金
・高校生のための数学講座(理:1994年~)
・おもしろテクノオリエンテーリング(工:1996年
~)
2.「体験入学」の要請
・1992年:札幌市内3高等学校の生徒の受入れ (理学部)
・1996年:教育学部、 工学部4学科
・1997年: 9学部で実施
・1999年: オープンユニバーシティ・体験入学
3.大学開放、地域貢献
58
北大の高大連携の現況
1.積極的な実施の意思と用意のある学部・
学科から試行的に高校生向けの授業提供
を実施し、効果と問題点を実地に調査検討
すること。
2.当面の対応として、理学部化学科における
計画を先導的試行として全学で支援し、高
大連携授業に関する「実験開発研究プロジェ
クト」を組織する。
(平成13年9月)
59
高大連携の目的
1.高校生への情報発信
2.大学はどのようなところかを知ってもらう
3.大学の勉強や研究の面白さを伝える
4.大学の勉強、研究の先にあるもの(仕事)
への繋がりを感じてもらう
6. 教員の相互交流
60
高大連携教育への疑問
1.大学教員の本務は、大学生を教育すること
なのでは?
2.「難しかったけれど、おもしろかった」
「もっと他の講義も聴きたい」という高校生の
声にどう応えればよいのか?
⇒ 効果をどう測るのか
(満足度だけでよいのか?)
61
研究のとりくみ
1. 試行プログラムによる実践的研究
2. 学内の合意形成
3. 2006年問題、初修理科
62
調査項目
だれが関与しているのか?
 はじまったきっかけと今後の見通しは?
 何をやっているのか?
 予算はどこから?
 効果を測定しているか?

63
これからの学校・大学連携
予算削減によるプログラムの統廃合
 数量的及び質的なアセスメントの増加
 プログラムの孤立を回避するための
ネットワークの創設

64
全米併行履修プログラム協会
スタンダード




カリキュラム
教員
学生
成績評価
 プログラム評価
65
米国の
大学先取り教育(Advanced Study)
1.試験による認定プログラム(AP, IB)
2.高校プログラム
(例:Tech-Prep,
ProjectAdvance)
3.大学プログラム
(Johnstone & Del Genio( 2001)
による分類)
66
試験による認定
特
徴
「大学レベル」であるかどうかは、卒業する高校や大学とは別の外部団体の試験に
よって認定される。試験は同等の科目を履修している大学生を基準にする。高校の
授業科目は「AP」で示され、履修は主として能力の高い生徒に限られる。成績評
価の3、4、5が「大学レベル」と考えられている。
例
アドバンスト・プレイスメント・プログラム
(The College Board)
規
模
の べ 受 験 者 100 万 人 以 上 、 14,000 高 校 に 在 籍 す る 生 徒 数 70 万 以 上
(1998-99)。年に12%増えている。
例
インターナショナル・バカロレア・プログラム(IB)、
大学レベル試験(CLEP)、軍人向けプログラム(DANTES)
利
点
AP教員と大学教員のチームによる外部評価を行っているため、高い妥
当性と信頼性があり広く受け入れられている。
懸
念
「大学レベル」の判定は年1回の試験による。現行の基準では3あるい
は3以上を認定。受験者の約3分の2が認定される。
高校プログラム
特
徴
「大学レベル」であるかどうかは、主催する大学によって認定された高
校教員が高校で担当するクラスの成績によって判定する。高校教員は大
学で研修を受けたり、大学の非常勤講師である場合もある。大学の成績
証明書に単位数と成績が記載される。
例
シラキュース大学プロジェクトアドバンスが最も古く、確立している
規
模
規模についてはよく把握されていないが、急増している。
例
最近のプログラムは短大(コミュニティーカレッジ)によるものが多い。
点
高校で開講し高校教員が教えるので授業料が安い。高校と大学の同時併
行在籍単位認定。平均以上の高校生を主として対象としている。
懸
念
外部団体による認定ではなく、APよりも低い基準であるために「大学
レベル」の認定に消極的な大学もある。
大学プログラム
特
徴
大学のキャンパスで大学教員が教える。「大学レベル」であるかどう
かは、学位を目指す大学生の受講者に同等の科目を教えている教員に
よる判定。
例
高等学校、特に秀でた高校生。近隣の大学の間で特別な調整が必要。
規
模
小規模で数も増えていない。
例
大学の通信教育も含む。大学での放課後あるいはサマープログラム。
利
点
少数の能力の高い生徒が大学の授業を受講するのでコストがあまりか
からない。特に単位や成績についての疑問は出されていない。
懸
念
高校生が大学でパートタイムの学生になるため、高校の授業に支障を
きたすことがある。履修に向かない高校生もいる。
今後の課題
1.2006年問題への積極的なとりくみ
・高校との対話
・カリキュラム改革
・大学先取り教育
2. 生涯学習の場としての大学開放
・高校改革(特色ある学校づくり)
と連動
70

similar documents