Gp_Reyad

Report
REMOVAL OF ARSENIC FROM
AQUEOUS SOLUTION BY
ADSORPTION WITH ACTIVATED
CARBON
GROUP MEMBERS:
Ajit Singh Patel
Kuldeep Singh
Reyad Ranjon Roy
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:
BACKGROUND:

Sources of arsenic

Why is its removal necessary?

Methods for removal
OBJECTIVE:

Removal of arsenic upto permissible limit.

Comparison of adsorption parameters

Study the effect of modification, pH, temperature and presence of co-ions.

Selection of efficient and economic method
METHODS:
The following types of activated carbon were used for :

Adsorption capacity and Isotherm study

Kinetic study

pH change, temperature variation, presence of co-ions

Coal derived activated carbon modified with NZVI

Bituminous based, coconut coal and wood based activated carbon

apricot stone based activated carbon hybrid adsorbents

Activated carbons with iron hydro(oxide) nanoparticles

Biomass waste (bean pods) derived activated carbon

china calgon activated carbon

Darco and norrit activated carbon

Charcoal activated carbon

Activated carbon from fibre cloths

Activated carbon from pine wood sawdust
FINDINGS:

modification of AC by iron gives higher removal and reduction in regeneration
frequency.

rapid adsorption and better removal efficiency by modification with Fe+3 than
Fe+2.

amount of iron present in water affects adsorption capacity as when amount
of Fe increases from 0 to 4.22% only then removal efficiency increases.

Oxidised AC gives very rapid and efficient removal upto less than 10
microgram/L As content.

the activated carbon, with higher value of ash content , was more effective
in removing As(V) .

Biomass(bean pods) derived AC provides very cheap removal of As(III). This
type of AC have higher efficiency than other for same specific Area .

Generally maximum adsorption capacity is found between pH 6-8 ,but
bituminous waste and coconut husk based AC gives maximum adsorption
capacity at pH 11.

coal derived AC which is modified with NZVI particles is superior for removal
of As(III) in available pH conditions for natural water.

Charcoal based AC is found to be best for the removal of As(V) in pH range
from 6 to 8.

SO42- and Cl- have more affinity to AC than arsenic.

Presence of common divalent cation like Mg+2,Ca+2 and Fe+2 increases the
removal % of arsenate whereas presence of Ag+ and Cu+ increases the removal
% of As(III) but decreases the removal % of As(V) considerably .

Adsorption by Fe+2 modified AC is endothermic while Adsorption by Fe+3
modified AC is found exothermic in case of apricot based AC. Some AC shows
insignificant change in adsorption capacity with temperature variation.
Issues and directions for further
research

For economic new waste produced materials such as from nutshell, peat etc.
should be used for the production of AC.

New modification method should introduce because Modified activated carbon
has more adsorption capacity than virgin activated carbon.
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