Lead SLP Advisory Committee Meeting

Report
Lead SLP Advisory
Committee Meeting
ESC Region XI
September 20, 2010
1
Student Attendance Accounting Handbook
2010-2011
• Available
on the TEA Website
• Change document
2
4.2.6 School-Based Preschool (Ages 3–5), Open to
Community
• If your school district establishes an education
program to serve all 3- and/or 4-year-olds
regardless of eligibility or other criteria, your
district may use the mainstream code (40) for a
student in the program who receives special
education services (other than speech therapy) in
the general classroom. However, for the
mainstream code to be used for the student, the
majority of students in his or her class must be
students who are not receiving special education
services. The 2-through-4-hour membership rule
applies to special education students who are
served by special education personnel to support
the individualized education program.
3
4.3.3.1 Transfer of Records
•A
district is expected to transfer the
most recent ARD committee
deliberations, including the current IEP,
to a requesting district within 10 days
using the Texas Records Exchange (TREx)
system
4
Requirements Related to Teachers Providing Instruction
in Mainstream Settings:
A student with disabilities receives specially designed
instruction The specially designed instruction
documented in the IEP is provided by special education
personnel. One teacher, even if dually certified, may not
serve in both a general education and a special
education role simultaneously when serving students in
grades K–12. Students with disabilities who are ages 3
or 4 may have an instructional arrangement/setting
code of 40, mainstream, if special education services
are provided in classroom settings with nondisabled
peers. The only context in which a dually certified
teacher may serve in both a general education and a
special education role is in an Early Childhood Program
for students ages 3 or 4.
5
4.6.1 Code 00 - No Instructional
Arrangement/Setting
This instructional arrangement/setting code
applies to a student receiving speech therapy,
whether the therapy is provided in the
general education classroom or in a pull-out
setting. If a student with disabilities receives
special education and related services in
addition to speech therapy, the code 00 is not
used, and the speech therapy indicator code
is reported as 2.
6
4.6.7 Code 41 or 42 - Resource Room/Services
Note that if a student is pulled out of general
education classes to receive special education
services and speech therapy, the appropriate
resource room code is used, and the speech
therapy indicator code is reported as 2. If the
student is a 3- or 4-year-old student in a PK
classroom and is ineligible for PK services, code
42 is used even if the student is not pulled out
of the classroom to receive special education
and related services.
Page 101
7
4.6.7 Code 41 or 42 - Resource Room/Services
•A
student whose only special education
service is speech therapy should be
coded with an instructional
arrangement/setting code of 00 and a
speech therapy indicator code of 1.
8
4.6.11 Code 40 - Special Education Mainstream
For a student to be coded with an instructional setting code of 40 (Special Education
Mainstream), the student must have —
•
•
•
9
Special education and related services provided in a general education
classroom on a regularly scheduled basis;
An IEP specifying the special education and related services that enable the
student to access the general curriculum and to make progress toward
individual goals and objectives; and
Qualified special education personnel involved in the implementation of the
student’s IEP through the provision, on at least a weekly basis, of direct,
indirect, and/or support services —
• to the student in the general education classroom and/or;
• in collaboration with the student’s general education classroom
teachers(s).
4.6.11.3 Preschool Programs for Children With Disabilities
(PPCD) and Mainstream Instructional Settings/Arrangements
4.6.11.3.1 Community-Based Preschool (3Through 5-Year-Olds):
A preschool student who is receiving
special education services in a licensed
community childcare facility that is
working in a collaborative partnership with
your school district also may be coded
mainstream, provided that the majority of
students in his or her class are students
who are not receiving special education
services.
10
4.6.11.3 Preschool Programs for Children With Disabilities (PPCD)
and Mainstream Instructional Settings/Arrangements
4.6.11.3.2 School-Based Preschool, Staff and/or
Community Access (3- Through 5-Year-Olds):
If your school district establishes a preschool
education program to serve preschool age
children regardless of eligibility or other criteria,
your district may use the mainstream code for a
student in the program who receives special
education services (other than speech therapy) in
the general classroom. However, for the
mainstream code to be used for the student, the
majority of students in his or her class must be
students who are not receiving special education
services.
11
4.6.11.3 Preschool Programs for Children With Disabilities (PPCD) and
Mainstream Instructional Settings/Arrangements
4.6.11.3.3 Prekindergarten Program:
A preschool student who meets eligibility
requirements for prekindergarten (PK) and
special education services and is receiving
special education services in the PK classroom
may be coded mainstream, provided that the
majority of students in his or her class are
students who are not receiving special
education services
12
4.6.11.4.2 Funding
For a student to generate mainstream special
education funding, certified special education
personnel must provide direct, indirect, and/or
support services (including consultation services)
on a weekly basis as outlined in the student’s IEP.
• If certified special education personnel are only
monitoring student progress, mainstream special
education funding cannot be generated.
• Page 106
13
4.7 Additional Guidelines for Instructional
Arrangement/Setting Codes
Reminder:
Base a student's resource room/services or selfcontained, mild/moderate/severe, regular campus
instructional arrangement/setting code on the
percentage of the instructional day that the
student receives direct, regularly scheduled special
education and related services, as required in a
student's IEP, not on the student's disability. If the
student’s only special education service is Speech
Therapy their instructional arrangement/setting
code is 00.
Page 107
14
4.8.1.2 Indicator Code 2 – Speech Therapy With
Other Services
For a student to be coded with an instructional setting code of 40 (Mainstream)
and a speech therapy indicator code of 2, the student must have
•
•
15
:
qualified special education personnel (other than a qualified speech
pathologist/therapist) involved in the implementation of the student’s IEP
through the provision, on at least a weekly basis, of direct, indirect, and/or
support services —
• to the student in the general education environment and/or;
• in collaboration with the student’s general education classroom
teacher(s); and
a qualified speech pathologist/therapist involved in the implementation of
the student’s IEP through the provision of direct, indirect, and/or support
services —
• to the student regardless of the location (general education class or pullout) and/or;
• in collaboration with the student’s general education classroom
teacher(s).
4.14.3 Codes 41 and 42 - Resource Room/ Services Examples
Example 4: A 4-year-old student with a disability who
is not eligible for the prekindergarten program but is
eligible for the special education program receives
special education and related services (including
speech therapy) in the prekindergarten classroom
for 3 hours 5 days a week.
•
•
•
The certified special education teacher teaches collaboratively in the prekindergarten
classroom with the prekindergarten teacher for the full 3 hours and the full 5 days.
The occupational therapist provides services for 20 minutes twice a week in the
prekindergarten classroom.
The speech therapist provides speech instruction for 30 minutes a week in a
pull-out setting.
The instructional arrangement/setting code for this student
should be recorded as 42 in the attendance accounting system,
and the speech therapy indicator code should be recorded as 2.
16
4.14.8 Code 40 – Mainstream Examples
Example 1: A student attends all general education
classes. However, this student has not been
dismissed from special education. Qualified special
education personnel are involved in the
implementation of the student's IEP through the
provision of direct, indirect, and/or support
services to the student on at least a weekly basis.
The student's IEP specifies the services that will be
provided by qualified special education personnel
to enable the student to appropriately progress in
the general education curriculum and/or
appropriately advance in achieving the goals set out
in the student's IEP.
The instructional arrangement/setting code for this
student should be recorded as 40, mainstream, in the
attendance accounting system.
17
4.14.8 Code 40 – Mainstream Examples
Example 6: A 3-year-old student with a disability
receives special education services (including speech
therapy) in a community-based child care center for
4 hours 5 days a week. The certified special
education teacher teaches collaboratively in the
community-based child care classroom with the
child care provider for the full 4 hours and the full 5
days. The speech therapist provides speech
instruction to the child for 30 minutes a week in the
community-based child care classroom and provides
consultation to the teachers for 15 minutes a week.
The instructional arrangement/setting code for this
student should be recorded as 40 in the attendance
accounting system, and the speech therapy indicator code
should be recorded as 2.
18
4.14.11 Speech Therapy Indicator Code 2 Examples
Example 3: Based on ARD committee
determination, a student receives services and
support from a special education teacher in the
general education classroom (outside of any
services and supports provided through the speech
therapy program). The student also receives direct
speech therapy services.
The instructional arrangement/setting code for this student should be
recorded as 40, mainstream, in the attendance accounting system,
and the speech therapy indicator code should be recorded as 2. The
instructional arrangement/setting code of 40 can be used regardless
of whether the direct speech therapy services are provided in the
general education classroom or a pull-out setting.
19
2010 Systematic Noncompliance
1) IEP teams were not properly constituted
2) Parents were not afforded opportunities for
meaningful participation
3) IEPs were not calculated to provide
educational benefit
4) IEPs did not have all of the required
components appropriately documented
5) IEPs were not implemented as written
6) Patterns of service and least restrictive
environment violations
20
2010 Systematic Noncompliance
7). Evaluations, reevaluations, or REEDS were not
conducted appropriately
• District using RtI after parent requests evaluation
without notice of refusal
• District using RtI without adequate documentation of
progress data
• Eligibility ARDC meeting not held within 30 days of
date of report
• REED not addressed
• REED addressed but formal evaluation not performed
when requested or needed
• Evaluation not completed with required components
21
LEA Determinations
Determination Elements
1. SPP compliance ( 9, 10, 11, 12,
13)
2. Whether data submitted by LEAs
is valid, reliable, and timely
3. Status of uncorrected noncompliance
4. Financial Audits
5. Performance-Based Monitoring
(PBM) Program Effectiveness
(stage of intervention for the
special education program area)
22
State will assign an LEA one of
the following Determination
levels:
•
Meets the requirements
•
Needs assistance
•
Needs intervention
•
Needs substantial
intervention
Letters to OSEP
23
ASHA: New Documents
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
(2010). Roles and Responsibilities of SpeechLanguage Pathologists in Schools [Position
Statement]. Available from
www.asha.org/policy.
• American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
(2010). Roles and Responsibilities of SpeechLanguage Pathologists in Schools [Professional
Issues Statement]. Available from
www.asha.org/policy.
•
24
Reasonable Workloads
For SLPs to be productive in the many roles
and responsibilities for which their
expertise prepares them, they must have
reasonable workloads.
• Therefore,
school systems and SLPs themselves
must make ethical and judicious decisions,
consistent with legal mandates, about the
services they provide.
• They must balance their scope of work to use
their expertise most effectively and efficiently.
• New or expanded roles cannot merely be
additions to an already full workload.
25
•Range of Roles and Responsibilities
•Therefore, SLPs must ensure that they assist the
students with whom they work to meet performance
standards and become productive members of
society.
•To comply with legal mandates, SLPs must determine
how students' academic strengths and weaknesses
relate to speech, language, and communication
disorders. To do this, SLPs collect relevant student
data in various contexts, develop intervention plans,
and provide services in collaboration with others to
meet students' educational needs.
• Consistent with the federal mandate, a continuum of
services must be designed to serve students with
disabilities in the LRE.
26
TSHA Eligibility Template Webinars
www.esc11.net/is/jkatz
27
Sunset
What changes can be made through the Sunset
process?
•
28
The State Board of Examiners would be abolished
automatically unless the Legislature passes
legislation to continue its functions. Legislation to
continue licensure may include changes designed
to promote efficiency, effectiveness, fairness, and
accountability to protect the public
EBP Update
1. Choosing the language of intervention for Spanish–English bilingual
preschoolers with language impairment. EBP Briefs
2. Remediation of phonological disorders in preschool age children:
evidence for the cycles approach. EBP Briefs.
3. Pharmacotherapy and Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A
Tutorial for SLPS. LSHSS
4. Effects of a Conversation Intervention on the Expressive
Vocabulary Development of Prekindergarten Children LSHSS
5. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Different Service
Delivery Models on Communication Outcomes for Elementary
School Age Children. LSHSS
6. Measuring Pragmatic Language in Speakers With Autism Spectrum
Disorders: Comparing the Children's Communication Checklist2 and
the Test of Pragmatic Language. AJSLP
7. A Review of Stuttering Intervention Approaches for Preschool-Age
and Elementary School-Age Children. CICSD
29
Clinical Question: What is the most effective approach to
treating bilingual children with language disorders?
Primary Results:
•
•
•
•
•
(1) Bilingual children make progress in both bilingual and English-only
programs.
(2) Bilingual children are more likely to make gains in both of their
languages if they continue to use both languages.
(3) Treated children were more likely to learn the targeted language
forms in their dominant language.
Conclusions: Maintaining the home language enables parents
to support language development in a way that they may not
be able to if their children are enrolled in an English only school
setting.
Choosing the language of intervention for
Spanish–English bilingual preschoolers with
language impairment.
Bedore, L. M. (2010). EBP Briefs 5(1), 1–13.
30
Clinical Question: Does the Cycles Approach result in
effective remediation of phonological disorders?
Primary Results:
(1) Treated children demonstrated improved consonant
production in conversational contexts.
(2) Treated children with less severe phonological and
language impairments improved in both domains.
(3) Earlier intervention resulted in greater outcome
improvement.
Conclusions: Evidence for the efficacy of the Cycles
Approach is limited. The best evidence available suggest
that this approach is effective with children who exhibit
severe phonological disorders both in isolation and in
combination with other language disorders.
Hassink, J. M. & Wendt, O. (2010).
Remediation of phonological disorders
in preschool age children: evidence
for the cycles approach.
EBP Briefs 5(2), 1–7.
31
Pharmacotherapy and Children With ASD
Method: This clinical resource was compiled to support
SLPs who need to understand the functions and effects of
medications that have been prescribed to a child with ASD
to whom they have or will be providing assessment and
intervention services.
*Lists of side effects by drug class
Pharmacotherapy and Children With
Autism Spectrum Disorder: A
Tutorial for Speech-Language
Pathologists Lang Speech Hear Serv
Sch 2010;41;367-375; originally
published online Jun 11, 2010; Trisha
L. Self, LaDonna S. Hale, and
Daiquirie Crumrine
32
Effects of a Conversation Intervention on the Expressive
Vocabulary Development of Prekindergarten Children
Clinical Questions:
1. Will 500 minutes of intervention focused on
conversation strategies that include the use of rare
words, linguistic recasts, and open-ended
questions by adults increase the vocabulary levels
of young children
2. Will this conversation Intervention impact children
initially have low vocabulary levels?
33
Range of income, average or below average
vocabulary
-Talking buddies: *let child lead *active listening
*wait time *conversation
starters
- EVT- Expressive Vocabulary Test
- Suggested applications:
-
-
Talk Center
-Eat with Teacher days
-At risk
Hilary P. Ruston, and Paula J. Schwanenflugel
Effects of a Conversation Intervention on t
he Expressive Vocabulary Development of
Prekindergarten Children Lang Speech Hear
Serv Sch 2010;41;303-313; originally
published online Jun 11, 2010
34
-Only 5 studies met the criteria
The unavoidable conclusion is that clinicians have
little research evidence on which to base decisions
about service delivery options.
-No conclusions are justified.
-No high quality evidence is available.
Recommend:
-Must use most natural setting possible (LRE)
-Rely on “reason –based practice and your
own data
35
Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Different Service
Delivery Models on Communication Outcomes for Elementary School
Age Children Flynn, Maureen Staskowski, T. Zoann Torrey, and
Deborah F. Adamczyk Frank M. Cirrin, Tracy L. Schooling, Nickola W.
Nelson, Sylvia F. Diehl, Perry F Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch
2010;41;233-264; originally published online Apr 26, 2010
Pragmatics
•CCC-2: parent report & TOPL- standardized test
•16 High Functioning ASD and 16 control group given both tests
•CCC-2 identified 13ASD
TOPL identified 9 with ASD
•Neither identified any in the control group
•CCC-s was substantially more effective at identifying pragmatic
language impairment in high functional ASD than the
TOPL (more sensitive)
•
36
Measuring Pragmatic Language in Speakers With
Autism Spectrum Disorders: Comparing the Children's
Communication Checklist2 and the Test of Pragmatic
Language Joanne Volden, and Linda Phillips Am J Speech
Lang Pathol 2010;19;204-212; originally published
online Mar 10, 2010
Stuttering Intervention Approaches
Conclusion: Need more research
•For children younger than 6, response-contingent
approaches are the most effective.
•Lidcombe Program rated as the best
response-contingent program for preschool
children who stutter.
A Review of Stuttering Intervention
Approaches for Preschool-Age and
Elementary School-Age Children
Aimee Sidavi, Renee Fabus
CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN
COMMUNICATION SCIENCE AND
DISORDERS • Volume 37 • 14–26 •
Spring 2010
37

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