Paul Clinton/Susan Sellers - TEPE

Report
Entry Task
As you enter, take several sticky notes and
respond to the following questions:
For those on “Focused”, how did you
determine your Criteria for this year’s
evaluation?
How do you determine whether
students in your class have grown
in their learning? (1 idea per sticky note)
TPEP: Writing Student Growth Goals & Strategies
for a Successful Evaluation
Susan Sellers, Paul Clinton
October 18, 2014
SHAPE Washington\West’s Best
Some materials for this presentation are courtesy of Scott
Poirier from his Measures & Evidence Training
[email protected] developed for the WEA
What are we going to Accomplish
Strategies for a successful evaluation
• Know the “State 8”
• Know your Instructional Framework
• Know yourself
Writing Student Growth Goals
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What’s important?
The criteria
The Goldilocks concept “Just Right”
Nesting goals
Examples
Strategies for a Successful Evaluation:
Centering instruction on
high expectations of
student achievement
Demonstrating effective
teaching practices
Recognizing individual
student learning needs
and developing
strategies to address
those needs
Providing clear and
intentional focus on
subject matter content
and curriculum
Know the
“State 8”
Fostering and
managing a safe,
positive learning
environment
Exhibiting collaborative
and collegial practices
focused on improving
instructional practice and
student learning
Communicating and
collaborating with
parents and the school
community
Using multiple student
data elements to
modify instruction and
improve student
learning
Strategies for a Successful Evaluation:
Know your Instructional Framework
CEL 5D+
Danielson
Marzano
Know Your Framework
(Frameworks at a Glance: tpep-wa.org)
CEL 5D+
Danielson
Marzano
Strategies for a Successful Evaluation:
Know Yourself!
Self Assessment
Preparing for the
Observations
Providing Evidence
Collecting Artifacts
• Review the elements and critical
attributes of each of the 8 Criteria
• Identify points of focus – even if on
“Comprehensive”
• 2 observations of at least 15 min each
for a total of at least 60 min.
• Provide a detailed lesson plan that
identifies the critical elements of your
chosen Criteria.
• Lesson Plans
• Pictures and videos
• Student Work
Strategies for a Successful Evaluation:
Resources
• To learn more:
edtech.wednet.edu/eVALTraining
• To create and account:
http:/eds.ospi.k12.wa.us
• General teacher
resources:
tpep-wa.org
• PE Specific Resources:
shapewa.org
Writing Student Growth Goals
Write goals that reflect the major concepts
you teach!
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Physical Skill Development.
Health and fitness knowledge.
Fitness Development.
Applying health & fitness knowledge to
students lives.
• ?
Writing Student Growth Goals
Write goals that reflect what you do best or
what is unique in your program.
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Dance
Outdoor education
Game Strategy & Tactics
Health & Fitness Portfolios
?
How do we determine in physical education whether
students in our class have grown in their learning?
Student
Growth
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formative assessments
Skill assessments rubrics
Peer assessments
Student Work Samples
Student Portfolios
Videos of performance
Grades
State CBA
Written tests
Unit assessments
District Fitness Assessment
Many want “Sameness”
in measurements
Measuring Student
Growth Pyramid
State-based
Assessments
District-Based Assessments
School-Based Assessments
Classroom-Based Assessments
Tough Questions for Physical
Educators
• Can or should we use fitness testing
data?
• Does the evidence for student
growth need to be the same for all
students?
What happens when non PE professionals
define student goals for us?
Physical Education Example: Students in a PE class are
required to go through an obstacle course every two weeks
during an 18 week PE class. Students strap on wrist heart rate
monitors and record their heart rates every time they go
through the obstacle course. At the end of 18 weeks, the PE
teacher has a graph of every student in their class and can
demonstrate that students are healthier at the end of 18 weeks
than they were when they started the class by seeing students’
improved (lowered) heart rates on the graph. The teacher can
take the graph off the wall and show the data to the principal.
The teacher has demonstrated student growth between 2 (or
more) points in time.
6.1 Goal: By the end of May, 4th grade students will all be in the Healthy Fitness Zone for
their age and gender based on the Fitnessgram assessments: mile run, sit-ups and pushups.
6.2 Multiple Measures: Fitnessgram, student logs, charts of progress, teacher
observation notes
3.1 Goal: By the end of May, students not in the Healthy Fitness Zone for their age and
gender based on the fall Fitnessgram assessments: mile run, sit-ups and push-ups will
progress to being in the Healthy Fitness Zone.
3.2 Multiple Measures: Fitnessgram, student logs, charts of progress, teacher
observation notes
8.1 Goal: By the end of May, district 4th graders will all be in the Healthy Fitness
Zone for their age and gender based on the Fitnessgram assessments: mile run, situps and push-ups.
Team of district PE teachers will meet through PLC groups during available time to
collaboratively discuss instructional strategies for improvement, examine student
data and plan for instruction.
Student Growth Rubric Language
Criterion 3
SG 3.1 Establishes
appropriate student
growth goals for subgroups
of students not reaching
full learning potential.
Goals identify multiple,
high-quality sources of
data to monitor, adjust,
and evaluate achievement
of goals.
Criterion 6
SG 6.1 Establishes
appropriate
student growth goals for
whole classroom. Goals
identify multiple, high
quality sources of data to
monitor, adjust, and
evaluate achievement of
goals.
SG 3.2 Multiple sources of growth or
achievement data from at least two
points in time show clear evidence of
growth for most students.
Criterion 8
SG 8.1 Consistently and
actively collaborates with
other grade-level, subject
matter or instructional
team members to establish
goals, to develop and
implement common, highquality measures, and to
monitor growth and
achievement during the
year.
SG 6.2 Multiple sources of growth or
achievement data from at least two
points in time show clear evidence of
growth for most students.
17
SG 3.2 & SG 6.2
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Distinguished
Growth or
achievement
data from at
least two points
in time shows
no evidence of
growth for
most students.
Multiple sources
of growth or
achievement
data from at
least two points
in time show
some evidence
of growth for
some students.
Multiple sources
of growth or
achievement
data from at
least two points
in time show
clear evidence
of growth for
most students.
Multiple sources
of growth or
achievement
data from at
least two points
in time show
evidence of
high growth for
all or nearly all
students.
SG 8.1 - Proficient
Consistently and actively
collaborates with other gradelevel, subject matter or
instructional team members
To establish goals
To develop common
high quality measures
To implement common,
high quality measures
To monitor growth during the year
To monitor achievement during
the year.
This is not about writing a goal. It’s
about:
• Your Personal contribution to be
collectively responsible for student
learning
• One of the most powerful
components to change a culture of
collaboration
• To collaboratively and actively
participate in authentic practices
that increase student achievement
What is the difference in qualitative indicators in SG 8.1?
Goldilocks Goals
• Consider writing student growth goals with
Goldilocks in mind: not too broad, not too
narrow, but just right.
4 Parts of a Student Growth Goal
Do something within a timeframe: Students will
• demonstrate, create, analyze, compare, differentiate,
compose, evaluate, design, synthesize, articulate, ect.
Content: Specific to what students need to know
Too Specific
X
Too Broad
Evidence of learning/growth: How is success defined?
Measures: formative & summative
Example Goal
STUDENT GROWTH GOAL
Literacy: Informational Text Science - 6th Grade
Too Narrow or
Specific
6.1
All students will
Whole make a
Group prediction based
on the title of a
book.
JUST RIGHT
During first semester, my 4th period
students will improve their ability to
identify text-based evidence to
evaluate predictions, inferences, and
opinions. Students will improve at
least one level in each of the three
skills, as measured by a four-point
rubric. Progress along the goal will be
determined through a pre-assessment,
graphic organizers, student work,
formative assessments, and a postassessment.
Too Broad or
Large
All of my
students will
understand and
use text-based
evidence to
content areas.
Example Goal for PE
STUDENT GROWTH GOAL
Physical Education - 6th Grade
Too Narrow or
Specific
6.1
All third period
Whole students will
Group improve their
one minute sit-up
score.
Too Broad or
Large
During first semester, my 3th period
All third period
students will set a SMART goal to
students will set
improve on one of their fitness tests.
SMART goals and
Progress and growth will be evidenced reach the
through student created graphs of their healthy level on
progress and a written analysis of their all five district
original SMART goal and results at the mandated
end of the semester.
fitness tests.
JUST RIGHT
Nesting the Goals
Another way to think of the three student growth
criteria is analogous to ‘nesting dolls,’ moving
from large to small (SG 8.1 to SG 6.1 to SG 3.1)
SG 8.1
SG 6.1
SG 3.1
Example of
“Nested” Goals
8.1 Establish Team Student Growth Goals: During First Semester, 8th grade students will
provide text-based evidence to support prediction, inference, and opinion as measured by
a four-point rubric. Progress along the goal will be determined through a pre-assessment,
graphic organizers, student work, formative assessments, and a summative postassessment. Success measured by SG 6.2
6.1 Classroom goals: During first semester, my 4th period students will improve their ability
to provide text-based evidence to support prediction, inference, and opinion. Students will
improve at least one level in each of the three skills, as measured by a four-point rubric.
Progress along the goal will be determined through a pre-assessment, graphic organizers,
student work, formative assessments, and a summative post-assessment. Success measured
by SG 6.2
3.1 Subgroup goals: During first semester, a sub-group of students identified in the lowest
tier of the rubric through a pre-assessment will improve their ability to provide text-based
evidence to support prediction, inference, and opinion. They will use supports such as
differentiated text, a scaffold frame, or an oral reader and uses texts appropriate to their
reading level. Students will improve at least one level in two of the three skills, as measured
by a four-point rubric. Success measured by SG 3.2
Example of Nested Physical Education
Goals
8.1 Establish Team Student Growth Goals: The theatre department and physical education
(teachers and students) will collaborate to introduce social dance to high school students.
During a three week swing dance unit for three PE classes and the theatre class, students
will progress from simple basic steps to complex swing dance combinations. Students will
display the proper social skills needed when engaging in social dance with a partner of the
opposite gender. Student led dance organizing committee will collaborate with the
instructors to plan and implement the swing dance party for all four classes at the end of
the unit.
6.1 Classroom goals: During a three week swing dance unit students will progress
from simple basic steps to complex swing dance combinations. Students will display the
proper social skills needed when engaging in social dance with a partner of the
opposite gender. Swing dance physical skill acquisition will be evident in a pre-video
taken in the first couple of days of the unit and a post-video of the culminating swing
dance party that will be held with three classes. Social skill development will be evident
on the dance party video and with a reflection piece that students will fill out at the
end of the unit.
Example of Physical Education Goals
3.1 Subgroup goals: During the course of the second
semester, seniors in all classes will improve their personal
fitness and relate these improvements to staying fit as adults.
Seniors are the least fit of all the classes at our high school
and this is at a time when they are about to enter the adult
world of fitness that will be dependent completely on their
own efforts and knowledge. Student performance will be
measured in two ways. First by pre and post fitness testing for
at least two of the twelve optional fitness tests as evidenced
by student created graphs of their progress. Second, by
SMART fitness goal setting in February and a written analysis
of their efforts and results in June.
Establishing Student Growth Goals
1. What are the major concepts you teach?
2. What do you do best or what is unique in your program?
3. What is your timeframe?
30
4. What do students need to know or demonstrate by
the end of the timeframe?
X
Too Specific
Too Broad
5. How will you define success/growth?
6. What formative & summative measures will you use?

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