Lateral Thinking Provocation Movement

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LATERAL THINKING
Lateral Thinking
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We think by recognizing patterns and reacting to
them. (perception) These reactions come from our
past experiences and logical extensions to those
experiences. Often we do not think outside these
patterns.
Lateral Thinking
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Provocation and Movement” is an important lateral
thinking technique. It works by moving your thinking
out of the established patterns that you usually use
to solve problems. It is the conscious effort in
thinking.
Lateral Thinking
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You cannot dig a hole in a different place by
digging the same hole deeper"
This means that trying harder in the same direction
(same pattern) may not be as useful as changing
direction. Effort in the same direction (approach)
will not necessarily succeed.
But how?
Lateral Thinking
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'Judgment' is our main thinking operation. With
judgment we recognise standard situations and then
apply standard responses. This is an excellent
system which serves us well. But it is no use for
creativity. If you judge a provocation you will
almost certainly reject it.
Lateral Thinking
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Instead of judgment, we need to use a very
different mental exercise called 'movement'. With
judgment we compare something with the past, with
something we know already. With 'movement' we
move forward to something new.
Lateral Thinking
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Lets say that you know how to play football well,
and you know how to play rugby well. What makes
it possible for you to be able to play both games is
the fact that you don’t mix the rules of one game
with the other. Likewise we must not mix judgement
with movement
Lateral Thinking
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JUDGEMENT is thinking with a black hat, its
caution, MOVEMENT is thinking with the green
hat.
Formal ways of setting up a
Provocation
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Arising Provocation(take anything
ridiculous as a provocation)
Reversal Provocation
Escape Provocation (Change of logic
principle)
Exaggeration
Wishful Thinking
Distortion provocation
Reversal Provocation:
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Reversal Provocation: Take detailed descriptions
of something we take for granted and reverse it
(opposite)
Useful to examine methods procedures and stable
systems
It shakes existing procedures, forcing to consider
them deeply and in a new way
Reversal Provocation:
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Factual : We pay when we hire videos. (reverse
method and stable system)
“Po” I want to hire videos without paying.
Reversal Provocation:
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Take this imagination forward by asking
The consequences of the statement
What the benefits would be
What special circumstances would make it a
sensible solution
The principles needed to support it and make it
work
How it would work moment-to-moment
What would happen if a sequence of events was
changed
Consequences:
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Consequences: The shop would get no rental
revenue and therefore would need alternative
sources of cash. It would be cheaper to borrow the
video from the shop than to download the film or
order it from a catalogue.
Benefits:
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Benefits: Many more people would come to borrow
videos. More people would pass through the shop.
The shop would spoil the market for other video
shops in the area.
Circumstances:
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Circumstances: The shop would need other revenue.
Perhaps the owner could sell advertising in the shop,
or sell popcorn, sweets, bottles of wine or pizzas to
people borrowing films. This would make her shop a
one-stop 'Night at home' shop. Perhaps it would
only lend videos to people who stayted in the
shop for a minimum of 10m to be able to absorbed
some commercials, (Smart TV)
Reversal Provocation:
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Or used as research place where people will drop
their questionnaires and those that fill in the
questionnaires will be eligible for free hire and
shop owner will get revenue from companies issuing
the questionnaire.
3. Escape Provocation
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3. Escape Provocation: It is obtained by modifying
usual order of events, time sequence, cause-effect
relationships, semantic relationships, …
3. Escape Provocation
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Fact: When I go to eat in a restaurant, I pay a bill
for the food I eat which the restaurant owner
decides.
“Po” I want to decide how much to pay for the food
and not the restaurant manager”
3. Escape Provocation
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Twice a week billing is left for the consumer to
decide. This will attract people and when they try
the food (which will be very very good) they will
end up going there on other days as well and shop
owner will have an increase in customers and in
revenue.
4. Exaggeration Provocation
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4. Exaggeration Provocation: It requires measures
and dimensions: number, frequency, volume,
temperature, duration…
It means suggesting a measure which is outside from
usual range.
4. Exaggeration Provocation
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Fact: Expiry dates are written in small print.
“Po” Expiry date is as large as 1 metre.
Creative Idea, expiry dates should light up when
item is in contact with body temperature
5. Wishful thinking Provocation
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5. Wishful thinking Provocation: It is obtained by
expressing a fanciful desire which is impossible to
realize.
This is a very useful tool to come up with ideas. By
dreaming of your ideal situation or solution you can
often come up with something which have similar
effect but in a more practical and realistic way.
5. Wishful thinking Provocation
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Wishful thinking: I will get paid whilst I remain at
home
Creative idea: Teleworking
6. Distortion provocation
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6. Distortion provocation: In any situation there are
normal relationships between parties
There are also normal time sequences of action
Distortion provocations are set up by changing these
normal arrangments.
6. Distortion provocation
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Fact: I close the letter then I post it
PO: You close the letter after posting it.”
“Creative idea
A sort of letter box that has a roll which seals
envelopes when posting letters. Giving me the
principle of closing the letter after posting it and so
there will be less paper to pull of sticky part of the
envelope and no licking.
6. Distortion provocation
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Fact: You wash clothes then you hang them.
“PO: You wash the clothes after you hang them
A system installed in a room with poles with vents
that emits steam that washes clothes by whilst
clothes are hanging…. Benefits would prevent time
in ironing, electricity and diminishing boring chores
with more time for fun.
Movement
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Movement is not just a suspension of judgment.
Movement is an active mental process. There are
steps that can be learned, practiced, and used.
Five formal ways of getting movement:
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Extract a principle or feature and work forward from
that.
Focus on the difference.
Look at the moment-to-moment effect of putting the
idea into practice.
Focus on the positive aspects.
Figure under what circumstances there would be
direct value.
Extracting a principle:
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Theme is Cigarettes
Extracting a principle: Would be cigarettes makes u
addicted to nicotine and to lose control.
Focus on this principle and come up with a creative
idea related with this principle.
Extracting a principle:
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Creative idea:
MIXED WITH NICOTINE THERE IS A RED BAND OF
A BAD SUBSTANCE WHICH MAKES YOU COUGH
BADLY LASTING ONLY FOR ONE PUFF. THIS IS TO
BE INSERTED TO MAKE YOU AWARE HOW YOU
WILL BE IF YOU CONTINUE TO SMOKE AND SO IT
WILL HELP YOU TO GAIN CONTROL BY MAKING
A CONSCIOUS DECISION EACH TIME YOU SMOKE
A CIGARETTE AND HELPS YOU AGAINST
ADDICTION.
Extracting a principle:
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Fact: Houses have roofs.
‘Po” Houses do not have roofs.
Movement extracting a principle can be that roofs
are there for security and to keep us safe and cosy.
Extracting a principle:
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'Houses should not have roofs'. Is not normally a
good idea! However this leads one to think of
houses with opening roofs, or houses with glass
roofs. These would allow you to explore positive
and useful sides of the basic concept that has been
challenged by the provocation.
Creative Idea: Houses with glass roofs, square tents
with plastic ceilings that open and close.
2. Focus on Difference:
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Focusing on the difference
“ I look for the keys
“P: The keys look for me”
What is the main difference? That the keys don’t have
voice and hands and legs to come and look for me.
2. Focus on Difference:
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Focusing on these differences will give me the ideas
how I can make up for these differences like
What if keys have a technical element installed inside
programmed by our voice and will emit a sound once
we call out for the key.
2. Focus on Difference:
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Fact: Scooters are not very comfortable
“Po” Scooters are as comfortable as cars”
Difference is in the facts that cars have heating,
more space, and position is more comfortable.
Focus on these differences and come up with a
something that makes up for these differences.
2. Focus on Difference:
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Creative Idea:
Scooters can have a Mobile back rest for more
comfort that can also go down and transforms into
another seat if needs be.
Can even have heating vents near pedals.
3. Moment to Moment
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3. Moment to Moment: in many situations, this is the
most powerful of the movement techniques. Here,
we imagine or simulate what might actually happen
if we tried to implement the provocation as it
stands. Along the way, we look for new ideas that
are generated by the simulation.
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Fact: streams flow down (exaggeration)
“Po” streams jumps down
3. Moment to Moment
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For example, the moment-to-moment simulation might see
water jumping downhill with deliberate steps. From this might
come the idea of changing the profile of a stream into one
that actually contains steps over which the water flows. At
the bottom of each step, there may be a small holding basin
that the water temporarily sits in before moving on to the
next step. This series of holding basins provides an
opportunity for sediments to settle out from the water and
be extracted by a series of small pumps at the bottom of
each holding basin. The water that flows over the next step
is therefore slightly cleaner than the water that flowed over
the previous step.
Creative Idea: Thus, as the polluted water walks downhill, it
is cleaned up with every step.
4. Positive Aspects
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4. Positive Aspects: This is a very simple technique
that concentrates more directly on the provocation
itself. Rather than thinking about where the
provocation might lead, we look at the provocation
and see whether there are any direct benefits or
positive aspects of the provocation itself. For
example, i
Fact: water flows downhill
“Po” water flows uphill
4. Positive Aspects
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From the provocation water runs uphill you might ask "what
would be the value of that?". Possible answers include:
If a factory has its clean water intake upstream of the
factory and its polluted water outflow downstream of the
factory, then it would now be taking in its own polluted
water and this would provide an internal incentive to clean
up the outflow; water running uphill would prevent pollution
from reaching international waters, thereby confining the
pollutant to the country producing the pollutant. Then Each
of these "benefits" could then be examined to see whether
they could be achieved by more practical means.
Special Circumstances
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. Special Circumstances: while provocations are
generally crazy and unsuitable for implementation,
there may be some special circumstances where the
idea may have some immediate use (even though it
may be impractical in general). For example, if the
provocation was "water polluters identified themselves
and made a voluntary payment to clean up the
pollution", this could suggest a "polluters club" that
polluters would be willing to join in order to buy and
sell permits that enabled them to pollute at a price that
was sufficient for someone else to clean up the pollution
on their behalf.
. High Value:
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Looking for 'special circumstances' in which the
provocation would have a high value is one of the
classic ways of getting 'movement'. It seems an
obvious thing to do: but, like many obvious things, is
rarely done.
Fact: Calls have all the same rate.
“Po” Calls do not have all same rate.
. High Value:
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A row of public phones at the airport are all priced
the same. We can challenge this. Why not have one
phone which is five times the normal price for the
same service? At first sight this suggestion seems
only to offer a negative value. Who would want to
use such a phone and pay five times the normal
rate? We now look around for circumstances which
would give direct value to this provocation.
High Value:
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No one would want to use this very expensive
phone. So that phone booth would tend to be
empty. So if you needed to make a really urgent
call, you would be more likely to find an available
phone. If the call was really urgent you would not
mind the high price. (This idea was first suggested
when mobile phones were much less common.)

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