PBIS

Report
Nijmegen, Netherlands
George Sugai
University of Connecticut
Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports
Center on Behavioral Education & Research
17 September 2013
www.pbis.org www.cber.org
PBIS is about….
Improving
classroom &
school climate
Integrating
Decreasing
academic &
reactive
behavior
management
initiatives
Improving
support for
students w/
EBD
Maximizing
academic
achievement
•
Surgeon General’s Report on Youth Violence (2001)
•
Coordinated Social Emotional & Learning
(Greenberg et al., 2003)
•
Center for Study & Prevention of Violence (2006)
•
White House Conference on School Violence (2006)
Positive
predictable
school-wide
climate
Multi-component,
multi-year schoolfamily-community
effort
High rates
academic &
social success
Preventing
Violent Behavior
Formal social
skills instruction
Positive adult
role models
Positive active
supervision &
reinforcement
Kandinsky College Malderburchtstraat
Nijmegen 17 Sep 2013
Establish
positive school
climate
Maximizing
academic
success
Communicating
positively
HOW?
Teaching
important social
skills
Modeling good
behavior
Recognizing
good behavior
Kandinsky College Malderburchtstraat
Nijmegen 17 Sep 2013
What contributes to a negative school climate?
What does positive school climate look like?
How could you contribute to positive school
climate?
Kandinsky College Malderburchtstraat
Nijmegen 17 Sep 2013
Do behaviors
that contribute
to positive
school climate
Join PBIS
team
Catch others
contributing to
a positive
school climate
What
can you
do?
Discuss
climate with
teachers &
administrators
Behavior &
environment
are functional
related
Behavior is
learned
Biology is
important
Behavior
Analytic
Approach
Behavior is
lawful, therefore
understandable
& can be
influenced
Adjust
environment to
influence &
teach behavior
Prevention Logic for All
Redesign of teaching environments…not students
Prevention Objectives
Prevent
Decrease worsening &
Eliminate
reduce
developmen
triggers &
t of new
intensity of maintainers
problem
of problem
existing
problem
behaviors
behaviors
behaviors
Prevention Actions
Add triggers
Teach,
&
monitor, &
maintainers acknowledge
prosocial
of prosocial
behavior
behavior
Biglan, 1995; Mayer, 1995; Walker et al., 1996
LEARNING HISTORY is
• Collection of experiences
• Shaped by place, people, & time
• If important, predicts future behavior
CULTURE is
•
•
•
•
•
Group of individuals
Verbal & overt behavior
Shared learning history
Differentiates one group from another
Predicts future behavior
Your learning history & culture shapes
How you
act.
How you
react.
How you
are
perceived.
What you
are likely
to do.
Misinterpret
communication
or behavior
Other
React
inappropriately
What could happen if
you I don’t know your
or other learning
history?
Offend family
or culture
Say/do
something
hurtful
Develop
stereotype
Individual Learning
History & Context
5.
1.
2.
3.
Indicate 10 key life events/influences (you, students, parents, staff, etc.)
Summarize in 4 descriptors.
Describe how learning history affects how you describe & act on what you
experience.
6.
4.
7.
3.
8.
2.
9.
________________
Your Name
1.
10.
Vincent, Randall,
Cartledge, Tobin, &
Swain-Bradway 2011;
Sugai, O’Keeffe, &
Fallon, 2012ab
Culturally Equitable Academic &
Social Behavior Expectations
OUTCOMES
Culturally Valid
Information for
Decisions
Culturally
Knowledgeable
Teachers
PRACTICES
Culturally Relevant & Effective
Instruction
PBIS (aka SWPBS) is
Framework for enhancing
adoption & implementation of
Continuum of evidence-based
interventions to achieve
Academically & behaviorally
important outcomes for
All students
IMPLEMENTATION
W/ FIDELITY
CONTINUUM OF
CONTINUOUS
EVIDENCE-BASED
PROGRESS
INTERVENTIONS
MONITORING
UNIVERSAL
SCREENING
PBIS
DATA-BASED
DECISION MAKING
& PROBLEM
SOLVING
CONTENT
EXPERTISE &
FLUENCY
TEAM-BASED
IMPLEMENTATION
CONTINUUM OF
SCHOOL-WIDE
INSTRUCTIONAL &
POSITIVE BEHAVIOR
SUPPORT
FEW
~5%
~15%
SOME
Primary Prevention:
School-/ClassroomWide Systems for
All Students,
Staff, & Settings
ALL
~80% of Students
All: Baker, 2005 JPBI; Eber, 2012
Tertiary Prevention:
Specialized
Individualized
Systems for Students
with High-Risk Behavior
Secondary Prevention:
Specialized Group
Systems for Students
with At-Risk Behavior
Intensive
Targeted
Universal
Few
Some
All
Dec 7, 2007
Continuum of
Support for
ALL
Continuum of
Support
“Theora”
Math
Intensive
Science
Targeted
Writing
Spanish
Comprehension
Soc skills
Decoding
Universal
Technology
Soc Studies
Basketball
Label behavior…not people
Dec 7, 2007
Intensive
Continuum of
Support for
ALL:
“Molcom”
Anger man.
Prob Sol.
Targeted
Technology
Ind. play
Adult rel.
Self-assess
Attend.
Universal
Homework
Coop play
Peer interac
Label behavior…not
Dec 7, 2007 people
Intensive
__________
__________
Targeted
__________
Continuum of
Support for
ALL:
“________”
_________
_________
________
_______
________
Universal
___________
_________
Dec 7, 2007
_________
ESTABLISHING CONTINUUM of SWPBS
TERTIARY PREVENTION
• Function-based support
• Wraparound
• Person-centered planning
•
•
SECONDARY PREVENTION
• Check in/out
• Targeted social skills instruction
• Peer-based supports
• Social skills club
•
PRIMARY PREVENTION
• Teach SW expectations
• Proactive SW discipline
• Positive reinforcement
• Effective instruction
• Parent engagement
•
Responsiveness to Intervention
Academic Systems
Intensive, Individual Interventions
•Individual Students
•Assessment-based
•High Intensity
Circa 1996
1-5%
5-10%
Targeted Group Interventions
•Some students (at-risk)
•High efficiency
•Rapid response
Universal Interventions
•All students
•Preventive, proactive
Behavioral Systems
80-90%
1-5%
Intensive, Individual Interventions
•Individual Students
•Assessment-based
•Intense, durable procedures
5-10%
Targeted Group Interventions
•Some students (at-risk)
•High efficiency
•Rapid response
80-90%
Universal Interventions
•All settings, all students
•Preventive, proactive
Academic-Behavior Connection
Algozzine, B., Wang, C., & Violette, A. S. (2011). Reexamining the relationship between
academic achievement and social behavior. Journal of Positive Behavioral
Interventions, 13, 3-16.
Burke, M. D., Hagan-Burke, S., & Sugai, G. (2003). The efficacy of function-based
interventions for students with learning disabilities who exhibit escape-maintained
problem behavior: Preliminary results from a single case study. Learning Disabilities
Quarterly, 26, 15-25.
McIntosh, K., Chard, D. J., Boland, J. B., & Horner, R. H. (2006). Demonstration of combined
efforts in school-wide academic and behavioral systems and incidence of reading and
behavior challenges in early elementary grades. Journal of Positive Behavioral
Interventions, 8, 146-154.
McIntosh, K., Horner, R. H., Chard, D. J., Dickey, C. R., and Braun, D. H. (2008). Reading
skills and function of problem behavior in typical school settings. Journal of Special
Education, 42, 131-147.
Nelson, J. R., Johnson, A., & Marchand-Martella, N. (1996). Effects of direct instruction,
cooperative learning, and independent learning practices on the classroom behavior of
students with behavioral disorders: A comparative analysis. Journal of Emotional and
Behavioral Disorders, 4, 53-62.
Wang, C., & Algozzine, B. (2011). Rethinking the relationship between reading and behavior
in early elementary school. Journal of Educational Research, 104, 100-109.
Supporting Social Competence &
Academic Achievement
OUTCOMES
Supporting
Decision
Making
Supporting
Staff Behavior
PRACTICES
Supporting
Student Behavior
Vincent, Randall,
Cartledge, Tobin, &
Swain-Bradway 2011;
Sugai, O’Keeffe, &
Fallon, 2012ab
Culturally Equitable Academic &
Social Behavior Expectations
OUTCOMES
Culturally Valid
Information for
Decisions
Culturally
Knowledgeable
Teachers
PRACTICES
Culturally Relevant & Effective
Instruction
GENERAL
IMPLEMENTATION
PROCESS:
“Getting Started”
Team
Agreements
Data-based
Action Plan
Evaluation
Implementation
Kandinsky College Malderburchtstraat
Nijmegen 17 Sep 2013
Team
Process
Agreements
Make plan
Is it working?
Do it
SWPBS
Practices
Classroom
Non-classroom
Student
Family
• Smallest #
• Evidence-based
• Biggest, durable effect
SCHOOL-WIDE
CLASSROOM
1.1. Leadership team
1.All school-wide
2.Behavior purpose statement
3.Set of positive expectations & behaviors
4.Procedures for teaching SW & classroom-wide
expected behavior
5.Continuum of procedures for encouraging
expected behavior
EVIDENCEBASED
INTERVENTION
PRACTICES
6.Continuum of procedures for discouraging rule
violations
INDIVIDUAL STUDENT
2.Function-based behavior support planning
3.Team- & data-based decision making
4.Comprehensive person-centered planning &
wraparound processes
5.Targeted social skills & self-management
instruction
6. Individualized instructional & curricular
accommodations
3.Positively stated expectations posted, taught,
reviewed, prompted, & supervised.
4.Maximum engagement through high rates of
opportunities to respond, delivery of evidencebased instructional curriculum & practices
5.Continuum of strategies to acknowledge displays
of appropriate behavior.
6.Continuum of strategies for responding to
inappropriate behavior.
7.Procedures for on-going data-based monitoring &
evaluation
1.Behavioral competence at school & district levels
2.Maximum structure & predictability in routines &
environment
NONCLASSROOM
1.Positive expectations & routines
taught & encouraged
FAMILY ENGAGEMENT
1.Continuum of positive behavior support for all
families
2.Frequent, regular positive contacts,
2.Active supervision by all staff (Scan, communications, & acknowledgements
move, interact)
3.Formal & active participation & involvement as
3.Precorrections & reminders
equal partner
4.Positive reinforcement
4.Access to system of integrated school &
community resources
Leadership team
Procedures for
on-going databased monitoring
& evaluation
Behavior purpose
statement
School-Wide PBS
(Tier 1)
Continuum of
procedures for
discouraging rule
violations
Continuum of procedures
for encouraging expected
behavior
Set of positive
expectations &
behaviors
Procedures for teaching
SW & classroom-wide
expected behavior
Expectations
Teaching
Matrix
SETTING
All
Settings
Hallways
Playgrounds
Cafeteria
Library/
Compute
r Lab
Study,
read,
compute.
Sit in one
spot.
Watch for
your stop.
Assembly
Bus
Respect
Ourselves
Be on task.
Give your
best effort.
Be
prepared.
Walk.
Have a plan.
Eat all your
food.
Select
healthy
foods.
Respect
Others
Be kind.
Hands/feet
to self.
Help/share
with
others.
Use normal
voice
volume.
Walk to
right.
Play safe.
Include
others.
Share
equipment.
Practice
good table
manners
Whisper.
Return
books.
Listen/watch.
Use
appropriate
applause.
Use a quiet
voice.
Stay in your
seat.
Respect
Property
Recycle.
Clean up
after self.
Pick up
litter.
Maintain
physical
space.
Use
equipment
properly.
Put litter in
garbage can.
Replace
trays &
utensils.
Clean up
eating area.
Push in
chairs.
Treat
books
carefully.
Pick up.
Treat chairs
appropriately.
Wipe your
feet.
Sit
appropriately.
Teaching Academics &
Behaviors
ADJUST for
Efficiency
MONITOR &
ACKNOWLEDGE
Continuously
PRACTICE
In Setting
DEFINE
Simply
MODEL
May 23 2013
RCT & Group Design PBIS Studies
Bradshaw, C.P., Koth, C. W., Thornton, L. A., & Leaf, P. J. (2009). Altering school climate through
school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports: Findings from a grouprandomized effectiveness trial. Prevention Science, 10(2), 100-115
Bradshaw, C. P., Koth, C. W., Bevans, K. B., Ialongo, N., & Leaf, P. J. (2008). The impact of
school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) on the organizational
health of elementary schools. School Psychology Quarterly, 23(4), 462-473.
Bradshaw, C. P., Mitchell, M. M., & Leaf, P. J. (2010). Examining the effects of School-Wide
Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports on student outcomes: Results from a
randomized controlled effectiveness trial in elementary schools. Journal of Positive Behavior
Interventions, 12, 133-148.
Bradshaw, C. P., Reinke, W. M., Brown, L. D., Bevans, K. B., & Leaf, P. J. (2008). Implementation
of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) in elementary schools:
Observations from a randomized trial. Education & Treatment of Children, 31, 1-26.
Bradshaw, C. P., Waasdorp, T. E. & Leaf, P. J. (2012). Effects of School-Wide Positive
Behavioral Interventions and Supports on child behavior problems. Pediatrics, 130(5),
1136-1145.
Horner, R., Sugai, G., Smolkowski, K., Eber, L., Nakasato, J., Todd, A., & Esperanza, J., (2009). A
randomized, wait-list controlled effectiveness trial assessing school-wide positive behavior
support in elementary schools. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 11, 133-145.
Horner, R. H., Sugai, G., & Anderson, C. M. (2010). Examining the evidence base for school-wide
positive behavior support. Focus on Exceptionality, 42(8), 1-14.
Waasdorp, T. E., Bradshaw, C. P., & Leaf, P. J. (2012). The impact of School-wide Positive
Behavioral Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS) on bullying and peer rejection: A
randomized controlled effectiveness trial. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent
Medicine, 116(2), 149-156
PRACTICE
“Don’t Throw
Stones!”
Effective
IMPLEMENTATION
Effective
Maximum
Student
Benefits
Not
Effective
Fixsen & Blase, 2009
Not Effective
Start
w/
What
Works
Focus
on
Fidelity
Detrich, Keyworth, & States (2007). J. Evid.-based Prac. in Sch.
Funding
Visibility
Political
Support
Policy
SWPBS
Implementation LEADERSHIP TEAM
Blueprint
(Coordination)
www.pbis.org
Training
Coaching
Evaluation
Local School/District Implementation
Demonstrations
Behavioral
Expertise
Cultural/Context
Considerations
Start w/
effective,
efficient, &
relevant,
doable
Basic
“Logic”
PRACTICES
Implementation
Fidelity
Prepare &
support
implementation
Training
+
Coaching
+
Evaluation
Improve “Fit”
Maximum
Student
Outcomes
Effective Organizations
Common
Language
SWPBS
PBIS
Common
Experience
GOAL to create safe, respectful,
effective, & relevant social
culture where successful
teaching & learning are
possible & problem behaviors
are prevented
Common
Vision/Values
Quality
Leadership

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