Presentation - First Nations Human Resource Labour

Report
NENAS
FNHRLC
MCFNTS
SNTC
BC FIRST NATIONS HUMAN RESOURCE LABOUR COUNCIL

Signers of the Aboriginal Employment Skills Training Strategy (ASETS)

The “Go to Body” for Aboriginal employment and training initiatives in
British Columbia

Managers, Executive Directors of non profit society’s,

Respected and Supported by our First Nation Leadership within BC.

Champions of First Nations training and labour market needs

Service providers to the two hundred and three First Nation
communities in BC, off and on reserve and Inuit people

Aboriginal organizations delivering employment and training services
to Aboriginal communities and individuals
North West ASET
Provincial and Territorial Distribution of the Aboriginal
Population in Canada, in Percentage of Total
Aboriginal Population, 2006
25
20.7
20
16.7
16.1
15
15
12.1
9.2
10
5
2.1
2
1.8
1.5
0.6
Yukon
New Brunswick
N.W.T.
Newfoundland % Labrador
Nova Scotia
Nunavut
Quebec
Saskatchewan
Manitoba
Alberta
B.C.
Ontario
0
0.1
P.E.I.
2.1
BC FIRST NATIONS HUMAN RESOURCE LABOUR COUNCIL
ASET AGREEMENTS FOCUS ON THE FOLLOWING:
 Demand driven skills development
 Fostering partnership with private, provincial,
territorial and national economic development
sectors
 Enhanced accountability
BC FIRST NATIONS HUMAN RESOURCE LABOUR COUNCIL
Principles:
Respect for divergent viewpoints
 Responsive to regional needs
 Equal voice at the table
 Strategic in approach
 Purpose driven
 Together as one

 Champion
of First Nation training and
labour market issues
BC FIRST NATIONS HUMAN RESOURCE LABOUR COUNCIL
PURPOSE
To influence social change by:
 Formulation of First Nation labour and
human resource development policies and
strategies
 Advocate for the successful implementation
of those policies and strategies
BC FIRST NATIONS HUMAN RESOURCE LABOUR COUNCIL
VISION
Focus on creating thriving and sustainable
employment opportunities and practices for
all Aboriginal people in the Province of
British Columbia.
BC FIRST NATIONS HUMAN RESOURCE LABOUR COUNCIL
 Create job opportunities through
investing in new partnerships and to
support viable existing
partnerships.
 Improve the quality and availability
of jobs for all Aboriginal peoples.
 Provide training opportunities that
will lead to sustainable
employment.
 Building equitable
relationships/partnerships with
government, communities and
Industry Sectors.
AHRDA /ASET
ALLOCATION BREAK DOWN (TEN YEARS)
Administration
Programs/Employment Skill Development
Employment Services
Labour Market Development
Child Care
Summer Student
$22,247,938.80
5%
$73,383,170.00
16.52%
$37,079,898.00
$55,619,847.00
12.5%
8.34%
8.34%
49.3%
$37,079,898.00
$218,771,398.20 ,
Total Clients
Intervention Completion
Employed
Return to School
Cumulative Employed/School
50,000
45,000
40,000
35,000
5,000
0
13,220
16,183
17,255
14,833
14,058
13,449
9151
10,000
6396
15,000
12,915
14831
20,000
15,561
25,000
19,293
30,000
BC FIRST NATIONS HUMAN RESOURCE LABOUR COUNCIL
CURRENT SITUATION
Canada’s Aboriginal population is in crisis. In 2007,
the National Council of Welfare concluded that, “To
date, no governmental response has made major
inroads into the issues” faced by Aboriginal people.
Improving the social and economic well-being of the
Aboriginal population is not only a moral imperative; it
is a sound investment which will pay substantial
dividends in the coming decades. Aboriginal education
must be a key component in any such effort (CSLS
2009 report).
BC FIRST NATIONS HUMAN RESOURCE LABOUR COUNCIL
 Relative to all other groups, Aboriginal Canadians are disadvantaged both
economically and socially.
 Their level of educational attainment is well below the national average.
 The labour market outcomes for Aboriginal Canadians are significantly
inferior to the Canadian average. In 2006, Aboriginal Canadians had a higher
unemployment rate, a lower participation rate, and a lower employment rate.
 In 2006, the latest year for which Aboriginal employment income data is
available, Aboriginal Canadians had much lower incomes than non-Aboriginal
Canadians.
 Aboriginal Canadians aged 15 and over have a much lower educational
 attainment than their non-Aboriginal counterparts with 43.7 per cent not
holding any certificate, diploma or degree in 2006, compared to 23.1 per
cent for other Canadians.
BC FIRST NATIONS HUMAN RESOURCE LABOUR COUNCIL
ABORIGINAL POPULATION STATISTICS
 In 2006, the Canadian Centre for the Study of Living Standards, (CSLS)
estimates that the Aboriginal identity population made up 4.0 per
cent of the Canadian population, with 1,311,200 persons.
 The Aboriginal population is much younger than the average
Canadian, with a median age in 2006 of only 26.5 years, compared to
39.5 years for all Canadians.
Age Distribution of the Population, per cent, 2006
Total
Population
NonAboriginal
Population
Total
Aboriginal
Population
First Nation
Metis
Inuit
0-19 Years
24.7
24.1
39.1
42.4
35.1
47.0
Under 5 Years
5.4
5.3
9.3
10.3
7.4
11.6
5-9 Years
5.8
5.6
9.8
10.6
8.3
11.5
10 – 14 Years
6.7
6.5
10.7
11.3
9.5
11.9
15 – 19 Years
6.8
6.7
10.1
10.1
9.9
11.9
20 – 44 Years
34.7
34.7
36.2
35.6
37.5
36.2
20 -24 Years
6.6
6.6
8.0
7.7
8.4
9.0
25 – 34 Years
12.8
12.7
13.8
13.6
14.0
14.1
35 – 44 Years
15.3
15.4
14.4
14.2
15.1
13.1
Above 44 Years
40.6
41.2
23.9
22.1
27.4
16.8
45 – 54 Years
15.8
16.0
12.2
11.2
14.2
8.4
55 – 64 Years
11.7
11.9
6.9
6.3
8.0
4.7
65 – 74 Years
7.2
7.4
3.3
3.1
3.6
2.6
75 – Years &
Over
5.8
6.0
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.1
BACKGROUND: Aboriginal Education
Proportion of the Population with No Certificate, by Age Group, 2006
Aboriginal Population
Non-Aboriginal
50
45
40
43.2
40.3
35
31.9
34
31.9
30
25
22.4
20
15.9
15
12.5
11.9
10
10
5
55 - 64
45 - 54
35 - 44
25 -34
20 - 24
0
BACKGROUND : ABORIGINAL EDUCATION
Proportion of the Population by Educational Attainment and Aboriginal Identity, 2006
2006
Aboriginal
Non-Aboriginal
Gap
No certificate, diploma or degree
43.7
23.1
20.6
High school certificate or equivalent
21.8
25.7
-3.9
Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma
11.4
10.8
0.6
College, CEGEP or other non-university
certificate or diploma
14.5
17.4
-2.8
University certificate, diploma or degree
8.6
23.0
-14.4
University certificate or diploma below bachelor
level
2.8
4.5
-1.7
University certificate or degree at or above
bachelor level
5.8
18.5
-12.7
High School Graduation or Greater
56.3
76.9
-20.6
High School Graduates or Above Completing P.S.
Education
61.3
06.6
-5.3
Source 2006 Census
BC FIRST NATIONS HUMAN RESOURCE LABOUR COUNCIL
PARTNERSHIPS
 Memorandum of Understanding with Ministry of
Housing and Social Development to collaborate and
improve participation of First Nations citizens in the
labour market
 Memorandum of Understanding with Industry
Training Authority, Aboriginal Division
 Memorandum of Understanding with BC First Nations
Leadership Council
BC FIRST NATIONS HUMAN RESOURCE LABOUR COUNCIL

To be inclusive of all Aboriginals who are often excluded from
participating fully in the economy

To undertake Human Resource development in a manner that is in
keeping with Aboriginal Values

To Combine the development of an “enterprising culture,” based on
a philosophy of self-reliance, creativity, and innovation, with a belief
in, and commitment to, cooperation, equity, and equal opportunity

To develop capacity, skills and resources for all BC ASET holders

Create economic sufficiency as well as enhance social and
environmental conditions, resulting in healthier communities
BC FIRST NATIONS HUMAN RESOURCE LABOUR COUNCIL
KRISTY CLARK EXERPTS FROM October 3rd, 2011 Throne Speech




Partnerships with First Nations are poised to unleash major economic
benefits for British Columbia and increase capacity and opportunity in
Aboriginal communities.
Your government will focus attention on establishing agreements with
First Nations that will create certainty over our respective
responsibilities. And while treaties may be an option for some
First Nations, there are many ways to reach agreements that can
benefit all communities — Aboriginal and non-aboriginal alike.
To further improve the investment climate, your government will work
with First Nations to create a new business and investment council to
foster wealth-creating partnerships.
The gap between Aboriginal and non-aboriginal British Columbia
remains too wide and too deep. New economic partnerships will
contribute to our shared goals of family and community stability,
bringing new opportunities and hope for young people.
BC FIRST NATIONS HUMAN RESOURCE LABOUR COUNCIL
HONOURABLE Steven L. Point, Exerpts from October 7th Throne Speech

Honourable Steven L. Point, British Columbia’s 28th
Lieutenant Governor announced that the BC
Government is committed to the development of an
off-reserve Aboriginal action plan. The Lieutenant
Governor stated that “the government will work with
Aboriginal partners, the federal government and local
governments to develop an off-reserve Aboriginal
action plan to achieve better education and job training,
healthier family life, and strengthened cultures and
traditions.”
BC FIRST NATIONS HUMAN RESOURCE LABOUR COUNCIL
SETTING A PATH FORWARD
 By developing a BC Aboriginal Human Resource Strategy
 The First Nations Human Resource Labour Council is seeking
willingness and commitment from Industry and Government, to
collaborate on labour market development. We envision the
collaboration will emerge through:
 Jointly drafted guiding principles
 Described vision and shared goals
 Commitment to action by identifying short term strategic actions
and long term actions.
BC FIRST NATIONS HUMAN RESOURCE LABOUR COUNCIL
British Columbia has one of the most diverse populations of
Aboriginal people in all of North America. The province is home to
203 First Nations or approximately one third of Canada's 612 First
Nations bands – more than in any other province or territory.
More and more businesses, academics, governments and
organizations are looking to the current and future Aboriginal
labour pool as one important answer to some of the pressing
labour market questions in this country. The aboriginal population
is young and growing almost twice as fast as the country’s general
population (1.8 percent per year versus 1.0 percent),” stats Canada
Census report
BC FIRST NATIONS HUMAN RESOURCE LABOUR COUNCIL
The Creation and implementation of a Provincial Aboriginal Human Resource
Development Strategy
A strategy that is inclusive of and Supported by all Human Resource
Development Sectors.
The development of improved services direct to Industry, employers and
government partners.
A cohesive, made in British Columbia system of services focused on
addressing labour market challenges facing industry and the First Nations
labour force across British Columbia.
Reduce / Eliminate unnecessary overlap and duplication in the labour market
development programs”, by increasing partnerships and cost sharing, i.e.
Aboriginal Training Employment Program (ATEP)
Increased employment or employability and work readiness of Aboriginal
clients.
The collection of L.M.I. and analysis of patterns and trends to enhance service
delivery.
Build the awareness of ASET programs and services and FNHRLC
Increase capacity of ASET staff to engage partners
Enhance Management and Information systems and accountability, avoid
duplication of service delivery, maximize training and program funding
Provide effective monitoring and assessments of trends of Provincial/National
Labour Market and LMD systems.
HAND OUTS
On- and Off-Reserve Aboriginal Educational
Attainment, 2006
Off Reserve
Aboriginal
Off Reserve First
Nations
A
On Reserve
aboriginal
B
C
On Reserve /
Off Reserve
ga[
C-A=D
No certificate, diploma or degree
38.5
40.1
54.9
16.4
Certificate, diploma or degree
61.5
59.9
45.1
-16.4
High school certificate or
equivalent
24.1
23.7
16.4
-7.7
Apprenticeship or trades certificate
or diploma
12.0
11.0
10.3
-1.7
College, CEGEP or other nonuniversity confiscate or diploma
15.9
15.4
11.2
-4.8
University certificate, diploma or
degree
9.6
9.8
7.3
-2.3
Source 2006 Census Tabulations
BACKGROUND: POPULATION
Population Growth by Identity Group, percent unless otherwise noted, 1996-2006
Total
Population
NonAborigina
l
Aboriginal
North American
Indian
Metis
Inuit
1996 (in thousands)
29,610.8
28,706.7
904.3
648
214.2
42.1
2001 (in thousands
31,021.3
29,954.5
1,066.5
713.1
305.8
47.6
2006 (in thousands)
32,447.5
31003.2
1.311.2
835.9
409.1
53.0
Increase 1996-2006
9.6
8.0
45.0
29.0
91.0
26.0
Share Of Total
Population in 2006
100
96.9
3.1
2.2
0.7
0.1
Share of Aboriginal
Population in 1996
-
-
100
71.7
23.7
4.7
Share of Aboriginal
Population in 2006
-
-
100
63.8
31.2
4.0
100
81.0
14.3
6.6
6.9
0.4
-
-
100.0
46.2
47.9
2.7
Contribution to Total
Population Growth
1996-2006
Contribution to
Aboriginal
Population Growth
1996-2001
Source Statistics Canada (2005a), 1996 and 2001 Census of Population Adjusted Counts (July 1st).
* For 2006 growth rates which appeared in The Daily of January 15, 2008 were used as they reflect adjustments
made for incomplete enumeration. Population estimates may thus not be additive due to rounding.
Unadjusted and Adjusted Population Counts in Canada, 1996, 2001, and 2006
Total Population
Aboriginal
First Nation
Metis
Inuit
1996
2001
2006
Unadjusted
28,528.1
29,639.0
31,241.0
Adjusted
29,610.8
31,021.3
32,447.5
Difference( Per Cent)
3.8
4.7
3.9
Unadjusted
799.0
976.3
1,172.8
Adjusted
904.3
1,066.5
1,311.2
Difference( Per Cent)
13.2
9.2
11.8
Unadjusted
529.0
608.9
698.0
Adjusted
648.0
713.1
835.9
Difference( Per Cent)
22.5
17.1
19.8
Unadjusted
204.1
292.3
389.8
Adjusted
214.2
305.8
409.1
Difference( Per Cent)
4.9
4.6
5.0
Unadjusted
40.2
45.1
50.5
Adjusted
42.1
47.6
53.0
Difference( Per Cent)
4.7
5.6
5.0
Geographic Distribution of Aboriginal Population in
Canada, 2006
Proportion of the
Canadian Population
Proportion of the
Aboriginal Population
Share of the Aboriginal
Population in Total
Population
Canada
100.0
100.0
3.8
Atlantic Canada
7.2
5.7
3.0
Quebec
23.8
9.2
1.5
Ontario
38.5
20.7
2.0
Western Canada
30.1
59.8
7.5
Manitoba
3.6
15.0
15.5
Saskatchewan
3.1
12.1
14.9
Alberta
10.4
16.1
5.6
British Columbia
13.0
0.6
25.1
Territories
0.3
4.5
52.8
Yukon
0.1
0.6
25.1
N.W.T
0.1
1.8
50.3
Nunavut
0.1
2.1
85.0
Aboriginal Population as a Proportion of Total Population,
by Province and Territory, 2006
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
The Effects of Improving Aboriginal Educational and Labour Market
Outcomes and Aboriginal Social Well-Being in Canada
IF Aboriginal
Education
•Educational and Labour Market Outcomes of Aboriginal Canadians reached
non-Aboriginal 2001 Level in 2026
Improves
•Compared to the status quo, annual output is $36.5 billion
Incomes
Increase
Tax
•higher in 2026. Cumulatively, output gains are estimated at
•$401 billion.
•Tax revenues are $3.5 billions higher in 2026. Cumulatively, the increase in
tax revenues is estimated at $39 billion.
Revenues
Increase
Government
Expenditure
Declines
•If key social well-being gaps are also eliminated, government expenditures
are $14.2 billion lower in 2026. Cumulatively, savings in the form of
government expenditures are estimated at $77 billion.
Chart 1: The cumulative effect on output of increased Aboriginal
educational attainment and education – specific labour market
outcomes, Millions of 2006 dollars,
40
35
30
The total cumulative effect is $400.5 billion
(2006 dollars). It is represented graphically
as the area under the curvemost curve. The
total cumulative effect attributable only to
education is $179.3 billion. It is represented
graphically as the area under the lower curve
25
Cumulative effect of improved
education specific labour market
outcomes - $221.2 billion
20
15
10
Cumulative effect of improved
education - $179.3 billion
5
0
2001
2006
2011
2016
2021
2026
Aboriginal Part. Rate
in 2017 = NonAboriginal Part. Rate
in 2001
Analysis: Labour Force Growth
Summary of Aboriginal Labour Force (15+) Projection
Labour Force (15+)
Share of
labour force
in 2001
Share of
labour force
in 2017
Absolute
change,
2001-2017
Per cent
growth
2001-2017
2001
2017
Scenario 1
439,317
622,535
2.73
3.23
183,218
41.7
Scenario 2
439,317
674,889
2.73
3.50
235,572
53.6
Contribution
to overall
labour force
growth
2001-2017,
per cent
5.75
Summary of Aboriginal Employment Projection
Employment
Share of
Employment
2017
Absolute
change,
2001-2017
Per cent
growth,
2001-2017
Contributio
n to overall
employment
growth,
2001-2017
per cent
2001
2017
Share of
Employment
2001
Scenario 1
355,604
503,908
2.38
2.73
148,305
41.7
4.17
Scenario 2
355,604
627,181
2.38
3.39
271,577
76.4
7.64
Aboriginal Employment Rate in 2017 = Non
Aboriginal Employment Rate in 2001
Between 2001 and 2006, the proportion of Aboriginal
holding a university degree increased 1.4 percentage points.
This increase held for both the North American Indian
population as a whole (1.1 percentage points) and the on
reserve population in particular (0.7 percentage points).
These improvements are far from negligible.
Aboriginal people with a high school diploma or higher had
significantly better labour market outcomes, both in absolute
terms and relative to non-Aboriginal Canadians than those
who did not.
If the Aboriginal population’s employment and participation rates reach 2006
non-Aboriginal levels by 2026, it is projected that the Aboriginal population
will account for 19.9 per cent of labour force growth and 22.1 per cent of
employment growth between 2006 and 2026.
If Aboriginal Canadians were, by 2026, able to increase their level of
educational attainment to the level of non-Aboriginal Canadians in 2001, the
average annual GDP growth rate in Canada would be up to 0.030 percentage
points higher, or an additional cumulative $179 billion (2006 dollars) over the20012026 period.
If, in addition, the Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal employment rate gap and
employment income gap at each level of educational attainment were
eliminated, the potential contribution of Aboriginal Canadians to Canadian
GDP over the 2001-2026 period would increase to $401 billion, or up to a
0.068 percentage points increase in annual average output growth rate. This
potential, however, is unlikely to be fully realized in such a short period of
time since older Aboriginal Canadians are not likely to go back to school andreach the
2001 level of non-Aboriginal Canadians by 2026. Still, these
estimates show the potential gain that could be realized.
SOCIAL BENEFITS
There exist links between increased educational attainment
and better health, higher living standards, and lower crime
rates.
Increased government expenditures now would decrease the
dependence of the Aboriginal population on future government
expenditures and increase output, and hence lead to higher
future tax revenues and lower future expenditures.
Better educated Aboriginal Canadians will be more effective
leaders and thereby provide better direction for the economic
development of Aboriginal communities.
KEY STATS CONTINUED
The Aboriginal youth population in BC (15-24 years old) in BC peaking at
just over 54,000 people in 2013.
Aboriginal people have lower rates of secondary school completion than
the general population.
Aboriginal people have lower labour force participation rates than the
general population.
Aboriginal people have higher rates of unemployment, than the general
population, even with comparable levels of education.
The median age of the Aboriginal population in BC was 28 years in 2006,
higher than the national Aboriginal average of 26.5 years.
The non-Aboriginal population is much older than the Aboriginal
population. In BC, for
Example, the median age of the non-Aboriginal population was 41 years
in 2006 It was expected that there would be over 200,000 Aboriginal
people living in BC by 2009.
Approximately half the Aboriginal population (96,700) is 15-years old or
older, with two-thirds (63,600) considered to be participating in the labour
force..
In 2006, the latest year for which Aboriginal employment income data is
available, Aboriginal Canadians had much lower incomes than non-Aboriginal
Canadians.
Aboriginal people with a high school diploma or higher had significantly better
labour market outcomes, both in absolute terms and relative to non-Aboriginal
Canadians than those who did not.
In 2026, using the medium growth projection for Aboriginal and the General
population, the Aboriginal population is projected to make up 4.6 per cent of the
Canadian population.
Assuming no improvements in labour market outcomes, the Aboriginal
population is expected to account for 7.4 per cent of working age population
growth, 12.7 per cent of labour force growth, and 11.3 per cent of employment
growth between 2006 and 2026 in Canada. This high contribution is attributable to
high population growth relative to the non-Aboriginal population - especially in
younger age groups which tend to have high participation and employment rates.

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