Junior Class Meeting Class of 2014

Report
JUNIOR CLASS MEETING
CLASS OF 2014
RAMS - May 2013
Your Counseling Staff
Manual Majors A-G
Mrs. Marti Johnston
[email protected]
Manual Majors H-O
Ms. Christy Teague
[email protected]
Manual Majors P-Z
Mrs. Amy Medley
[email protected]
YPAS Majors A-Z
Mr. Dennis Robinson
[email protected]
ACT College Readiness Benchmarks
A benchmark score is the minimum score needed on an ACT subject
area test to indicate a 50% chance of obtaining a B or higher, or a
75% chance to obtaining a C or higher in the corresponding credit
bearing college course.
English
18
Math
22
Reading
21
Science
24
These are the minimum scores you need to indicate to the average
college you are ready for postsecondary work – More competitive
colleges will require higher scores.
ACT Scores
ACT Composite Mid 50th Percentile
Boston College
28-32
Murray State University
24
Brown University
28-33
Tulane University
27-31
Columbia University
28-33
University of Chicago
28-33
Duke University
29-34
University of Kentucky
21-27
Eastern Kentucky University 21
University of Louisville
24
George Washington Univ.
26-29
University of Michigan
27-31
Harvard
31-35
University of North Carolina 26-31
Indiana University
23-28
Vanderbilt University
MIT
31-34
Western Kentucky University 21
Morehead State University
21
Yale University
29-34
30-34
ACT & SAT Test Dates for 2013
ACT National Dates
SAT National Dates
June 8
September 21
October 26
December 14
May 4
June 1
October 6
November 3
December 1
www.actstudent.org
www.sat.collegeboard.com
College Preparatory Curriculum
Graduation Requirements
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4 years of English
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4 years of Math
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3 years of Science
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3 years of Social Studies
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.5 years of Health
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.5 years of PE or 1 year of Fundamentals of Dance
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1 year of History Arts
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2-3 years of the same Foreign Language
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21st Century Technology, or Computer Applications course
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4-5 Electives
Graduation Requirements for Out of
State Colleges
Here are just a few states that have different
requirements from Kentucky
 Alabama Colleges – 4 years of Social Studies
 Georgia Colleges – 4 years of Science
 Indiana & North Carolina – Require precalculus
 Texas – .5 credits of Speech and .5 credits of
Economics
What is a TRANSCRIPT??
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The transcript is the report sent to colleges that
reflects every semester of high school that you have
completed
Courses you have taken and credits earned each
semester are on the transcript
The level of rigor of each class is included on the
transcript (AP, Advanced, Honors, etc.)
Your total cumulative weighted and unweighted GPA
is on the transcript
Grades include all pluses and minuses, A’s, B’s, C’s,
D’s, and U’s!!!!
How To Be Successful
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Push yourself to take classes that reflect as strong and as rigorous
an academic curriculum that you can handle successfully
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Unplug yourself from the Internet and TV.
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Learn to develop your “intellectual appetite”
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Find your passion and follow it! Develop yourself as a leader in that
area if possible
Select school activities that will demonstrate your passion or
leadership in the subject areas you are passionate about
Discover what is available in the community, your church, scouting,
recreational sports, charitable organizations, etc. that will enhance
your experience and resume
Volunteer as much as you can
Monitor Academic Progress
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Do not assume that someone will contact you if there is a problem with
your academic progress. Keep in contact with your teachers and your
counselors
Develop strong study skills and time management techniques
Work on building a strong vocabulary and refine your ability to speak in
public
READ, READ, and READ more! Practice and refine your talents
Take advantage of as many educational enrichment activities as you can summer workshops, camps, honor symposiums, leadership seminars, etc.
Build your college resume by engaging in a well rounded balance of
academically rigorous classes, athletic participation, participation in the
arts, membership in worthwhile clubs, leadership positions, community
service activities, and giving of your time for the betterment of mankind
Helpful Hints
If you see your grades slipping, try some of these interventions:
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ESS (Extended School Services) work after school with a teacher
Peer Tutoring (National Honor Society) work after school with outstanding
students
Staying after school to work with your own teacher
Form study groups with other members of your class
Weekly progress reports (available from your counselor)
Assignment notebooks and planners
Structured study time at home. School is not the only place to study and do
homework
Participate in class. Be visible and care about what you’re learning.
Maintain a healthy lifestyle which includes proper diet, exercise, sleep, and
stay away from the use of illegal drugs and alcohol and anyone you know who
may use them
Finding the Balance … Plan Ahead!
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With the everyday stresses of being a student, making good
grades, meeting new friends, making choices and decisions,
becoming involved in activities, etc… it is important to find the
PROPER BALANCE.
Plan Ahead - develop appropriate relationships with your
counselor and those teachers you will be asking to write your
letters of recommendation - they need to know who you are now
so they can speak highly of you in comparison to other students
they have known throughout their career.
Identify special characteristics about yourself that set you apart
from other students who have the same GPA and Test Scores.
Clean up your face-book and my-space accounts now! 25% of
all colleges and universities now look at your accounts when
making college admission decisions.
Facebook, MySpace, Email Address, and
College Applications
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Consider that the information posted on these sites is
basically public domain.
In as few as 10 minutes after you have posted something on
these sites they are archived forever in over 20 locations
throughout the world.
Your personal sites can be viewed by college admission
counselors, college professors, employers, stalkers, that
creepy kid obsessing over you, as well as campus and local
police
Make sure your email address is a professional or generic
name and not something that causes one to pause and doubt
your integrity or character
Time To Do Some Cleanup?
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Remove photos showing you doing anything that could be
interpreted as inappropriate
Remove rude gestures, inappropriate comments,
questionable photos, etc.
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Unsubscribe to questionable groups
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Remove contact information
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Choose attractive/professional looking photos to post
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Un-tag any unflattering photos your friends may have posted
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Perhaps let your grandmother approve of what you have
posted!!!
EXPLORING
COLLEGES & CAREERS
Explore and Research
Colleges/Careers – Your Future!
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Identify what you like to do – How do you want to spend the rest of your
life?
Will you be happy with the financial resources available to you as a result of
that career choice?
Gather as much information as you can from informal visits to colleges and
attending college fairs.
Search college websites for minimum GPA and test score requirements –
look at the school profile – do you match?
Refine what you possible college major may be and explore colleges strong
in that area.
What careers are available to people with a degree in your chosen field?
Identify at least 10 Colleges/Universities you are interested in and spend
this summer researching everything you can about those colleges.
Top Occupations in the U.S. Based on
Growth Rate
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Network Systems & Date
Communication Analysis
Medical Assistants
Physician Assistants
Computer Software Engineers,
Applications
Physical Therapist Assistants
Dental Hygienists
Computer Software Engineers,
Systems Administrators
Dental Assistants
Personal and Home Care Aides
Database Administrators
Physical Therapists
Forensic Science Technicians
Veterinary Technologists and
Technicians
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Diagnostic Medical
Sonographers
Medical Scientists
Occupational Therapists
Preschool Teachers
Cardiovascular Technologists
and Technicians
Postsecondary Teachers
Hydrologists
Computer Systems Analysts
Hazardous Materials Removal
Workers
Biomedical Engineers
Environmental Engineers
Paralegals and Legal Assistants
In-State vs. Out-of-State
What’s the Difference?
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In-state institutions are subsidized by taxes collected by
state government offering lower tuition rates to residents
of that state
Out-of-State institutions will require you to pay higher
tuition rates because your parents did not pay the other
state’s taxes - tuition rates are sometimes more than
double what you pay for your own in-state institutions
Kentucky Colleges – Four Year Public
Universities
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Eastern Kentucky University - Richmond
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Kentucky State University - Frankfort
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Morehead State University - Morehead
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Murray State University - Murray
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Northern Kentucky University - Highland Heights
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University of Kentucky - Lexington
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University of Louisville - Louisville
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Western Kentucky University - Bowling Green
Kentucky Colleges – Four Year Private
Nonprofit Colleges and Universities
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Alice Lloyd College
Asbury College
Bellarmine University
Berea College
Brescia College
Campbellsville Univ.
Centre College
Embry-Riddle Univ.
Georgetown Univ.
Indiana Wesleyan Univ.
Kentucky Christian Univ.
Kentucky Mountain Bible
College
Kentucky Wesleyan College
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Lincoln Memorial Univ.
Lindsey Wilson College
McKendree College
Mid-Continent Univ.
Midway College
Northwood University
Pikeville College
St. Catherine College
Spalding University
Thomas More College
Transylvania University
Union College
University of the
Cumberlands
Most Common In-State Colleges
By Enrollment from duPont Manual
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University of Louisville (679)
University of Kentucky (460)
Western Kentucky University (158)
Jefferson Community & Technical College (107)
Centre College (74)
Murray State University (58)
Northern Kentucky University (53)
Bellarmine University (48)
Eastern Kentucky University (36)
Transylvania University (23)
Georgetown College (16)
Morehead State University (16)
Kentucky State University (13)
Most Common Out-of-State Colleges
By Enrollment from duPont Manual
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Indiana University Bloomington (32)
University of Cincinnati/CCM (27)
Washington University in St. Louis (22)
Vanderbilt University (21)
Indiana University Southeast (20)
Duke University (15)
The Ohio State University (14)
Boston University (12)
Maryland Institute, College of Art (12)
Purdue University – West Lafayette (12)
University of Chicago (12)
Columbia College Chicago (11)
U.S. News & World Report
Rankings of Best Colleges - National Universities
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Harvard University
Princeton University
Yale University
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology
Stanford University
California Institute of Technology
University of Pennsylvania
Columbia University
Duke University
Northwestern University
Washington University/St. Louis
Cornell University
Johns Hopkins University
Brown University
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Rice University
Emory University
University of Notre Dame
Vanderbilt University
University of California - Berkeley
Carnegie Mellon University
Georgetown University
University of Virginia
University of California - Los
Angeles
University of Michigan
University of Southern California
Tufts University
Wake Forest University
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
U.S. News & World Report
Rankings of Best Colleges - Public National Universities
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University of CaliforniaBerkeley
University of California - Los
Angeles
University or Virginia
University of Michigan
University of North Carolina
College of William & Mary
Georgia Institute of Technology
University of California
University of Illinois
University of Wisconsin
Pennsylvania State University
University of Florida
University of Texas
Ohio State University
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University of Maryland
University of Pittsburgh
University of Georgia
Clemson University
Purdue University
Texas A & M University
University of Minnesota
Rutgers University
University of Connecticut
University of Delaware
Indiana University
Michigan State University
University of Iowa
Virginia Tech
Miami University of Ohio
U.S. News & World Report
Rankings of Best Colleges - Liberal Arts
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Williams College
Amherst College
Swarthmore College
Middlebury College
Wellesley College
Bowdoin College
Pomona College
Carleton College
Davidson College
Haverford College
Claremont McKenna College
Vassar College
Wesleyan University
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Grinnell College
Harvey Mudd College
United States Military
Academy
Washington & Lee University
Smith College
Colgate University
United States Naval Academy
Hamilton College
Colby College
Oberlin College
Colorado College
Bates College
Some Top Schools for the
Visual Arts - listed alphabetically
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Art Academy of Cincinnati (Cincinnati, Ohio)
Art Institute of Chicago (Chicago, Ill.)
Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, Pa.)
Cleveland Institute of Art (Cleveland, Ohio)
Kansas City Art Institute (Kansas City, Mo.)
Maryland Institute College of Art (Baltimore, Ma.)
Memphis College of Art (Memphis, Tenn.)
Minneapolis College of Art & Design (Minneapolis,
Minn.)
Montserrat College of Art (Beverly, Mass.)
Pratt Institute (Brooklyn, N.Y.)
Rhode Island School of Design (Providence, R.I.)
Savannah College of Art & Design (Savannah, Ga.)
Some Top Schools for
Mathematics, Science, & Technology
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Massachusetts Institute of
Technology
Harvard University
Princeton University
University of Chicago
University of Michigan – Ann
Arbor
Columbia University
New York University
Yale University
Cornell University
Brown University
Northwestern University
Duke University
Johns Hopkins University
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Washington University in St. Louis
Carnegie Mellon University
University of California – Berkeley
University of Washington
Georgia Institute of Technology
University of Wisconsin – Madison
Purdue University – Indiana
Rice University
University of Massachusetts –
Amherst
California Institute of Technology
University of North Carolina –
Chapel Hill
Scripps Research Institute
University of Illinois
Some Top Schools for
Journalism & Communications
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Arizona State University
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Indiana University
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Iowa State University
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Michigan State University
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Northwestern University
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Ohio University
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Syracuse University
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University of Florida
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University of Georgia
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Kansas University
University of Iowa
University of Maryland
University of Minnesota
University of Missouri
University of North Carolina – Chapel
Hill
University of Oklahoma
University of Oregon
University of Southern California
University of Texas at Austin
Some Top Schools for Music, Dance, Theatre, and
Design & Production
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Cleveland Institute of Music
Indiana University (music)
Juilliard School of Music
Northwestern (music)
Oberlin Conservatory (music)
University of Cincinnati (music)
University of Michigan (dance)
Butler University (dance)
Ball State University (musical
theatre)
Notre Dame (musical theatre)
DePaul University (D&P)
Northern Kentucky (D&P)
University of Louisville (D&P)
Western Kentucky (D&P)
Carnegie Mellon (musical theatre)
Boston Conservatory (musical
theatre)
Roosevelt University (musical
theatre)
Florida State University (dance)
Stephens College (dance)
University of Florida (dance)
University of Illinois (music)
Manhattan School of Music
Yale University (music)
Duke University (theatre)
Emerson University (theatre)
U.S. News & World Report
Rankings of Best Colleges – A+ Options for B Students
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Pepperdine University
Syracuse University
Fordham University
Purdue University
University of Connecticut
Southern Methodist University
University of Delaware
Indiana University
Michigan State University
University of Iowa
Miami University of Ohio
University of Colorado
Baylor University
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SUNY College of Environmental
Science and Forestry
Marquette University
University of Denver
Auburn University
Clark University
Drexel University
Iowa State University
North Carolina State University
St. Louis University
University of Vermont
SUNY - Stony Brook
University of Alabama
Hints For A Campus Visit
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Make an appointment for your
tour
Visit In-session
Stay overnight when possible
Include your parents
Meet with an admissions officer
Verify admissions requirements
Discuss your chances for success
Obtain a school calendar and
catalogue
Determine college costs
Ask about financial aid
opportunities
Ask about student/teacher ratio for
freshmen
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Meet Faculty
Ask about Honors Program
Ask questions about academic
requirements and offerings
Attend a class
Ask about placement record
Identify career-planning services
Tour the campus/classrooms/labs
Tour the dorms/dining facilities
Tour the recreational facilities
Tour the city or town
Talk to students
Find out about student activities
Inquire about campus life
Investigate transportation options
Keep note about your visit
Write thank you notes
COLLEGE APPLICATION
PROCESS
Class of 2014
Top Five Tips for Juniors in
Preparation for College Applications
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Standardized Tests - complete all standardized tests your junior year and retake those
with low scores.
Grades and Classes - junior year grades are the most important (you are now settled in
your routine; more demanding courses predict college performance; classes you choose
speak volumes about your motivation and intellectual curiosity).
Teacher/Counselor Recommendations - if you share an intellectual interest with a
teacher they are more likely to give you a good college recommendation. Get to know
your counselor and connect with teachers you want to write for you.
Activities - the way in which you spend your time outside the classroom serves as
testimony to your moral fiber; assess whether your activities reflect a depiction of your
interests and passions.
Opportunities - admissions officers look for students who step out of their comfort zone
and seek new experiences. Ignoring an opportunity does not appeal to college
admissions officers.
College Admissions Criteria by Importance
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Academic Rigor, Talent,
and/or Mastery of Skills
Cumulative GPA
Grades in Advanced
Placement Courses
Grades in College Prep
Courses
Grades in All Subjects
ACT & SAT Test Scores
Class Rank (JCPS does not
rank)
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Essay or Writing
Samples
Honors, Awards, etc.
Counselor
Recommendations
Teacher
Recommendations
Interviews (if required)
Community Service
Work and Extra
Curricular Activities
Are You Ready to Apply?
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Have you decided what your college major will be?
Are you happy with the lifestyle and eventual pay scale you will be earning upon
graduation?
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Are you satisfied with your employability upon graduation?
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Will you be happy doing this for the rest of your life?
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Have you researched to find the schools that are strong in that area?
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Have you found a Kentucky College you would happy attending?
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Have you visited the college campuses, experienced the culture on campus, satisfied with
safety concerns, checked out the dormitory and food services, explored the town or city,
met with admissions counselors, and talked with your prospective primary teacher?
Do you know the entry requirements, audition repertoire you will be expected to perform,
and have a good grasp of that material so it will be prepared by audition day?
If you have answered yes to all of these questions – you are ready to begin the college
application process!!!
How Many Colleges Should I Apply To?
For most students it will be a list of about six schools
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Reach Schools (1 or 2): Aim for one or more “reach”
colleges/universities that are highly desired and highly
selective. These “dream” schools will have about a 10%
acceptance rate. If you don’t, you’ll always wonder, “what if?”
“Fit” Schools (1 or 2): It is wise to include one or two “fit”
schools where the odds are 50/50 that you will be accepted
based on your talent, GPA, and test scores
“Safety” Schools (1 or 2): Include at least one or two “safety”
colleges where admission is highly likely and a college where
you can afford to attend if you receive very little financial aid
What Will Be Your First Impression?
The appearance of your college application is very
important:
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If you are completing your application on-line, make sure all
the blanks are filled in and your application is complete
If submitting a hard copy – type the application or print
VERY NEATLY in black ink.
Make sure all the components of the application are in the
correct order
If you are mailing the application – address the envelope in a
very professional way – typed address labels are great
Most College Applications are
Completed Online
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Students access the application through the
college website, usually under “admissions”
Generally, a username and password will be
provided that will allow you to save your work
from multiple sessions
The final copy is either transmitted through
the Web or printed and sent via snail mail – be
prepared to pay the application fee with a
credit card
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJZjSVuCTl
g&feature=player_detailpage
The Common Application
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Available online at www.commonapp.org
Approximately 300 schools, including the
most selective liberal arts colleges, accept the
Common Application
You can either download the application or
transmit through the web
Use the college’s own application form if they
have one – but many have adopted the
common application as their own
Cultivating Colleges
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Many colleges are reluctant to accept an applicant unless they have reason to believe
that he/she is seriously interested.
Many colleges track every contact the applicant initiates and are more likely to accept
students who have made multiple contacts
A few ways to communicate interest include:
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Visit the college – if you do not have a personal interview stop by the admissions
office and let them know you came
If the college sends a rep to Manual or YPAS, go to their session and communicate
your interest
Attend a college fair in your local area and speak to the representative
Get a business card from any college representative you meet and write or email that
person to thank them and emphasize your interest
Note in your application that a particular college is your first choice school or one of
your top choices
Make sure your email address stays the same throughout the college search process –
if it changes tell the colleges
Listing Activities
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Always list activities from most important to least
important
The ones that are significant, as evidenced by leadership
and time commitment
Marginal activities should be de-emphasized
Don’t make a big production out of honors from
companies that put your picture in a book and then ask
you to buy it
Follow the college’s preferred format for listing activities
Listing Activities
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If one of your activities was chairing the Founder’s
Day Committee, it won’t mean anything to the
admissions office unless you explain what you did
and why the committee was important
If it was an honor bestowed on only one senior,
say so
If it involved presentations to alumni and
coordination of twenty volunteers for six months,
spell that out
You could also have the sponsor, counselor, or
principal write a letter outlining the significance
Get It In Early
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Keep on top of deadlines - there will be different
ones for each college and for each part of the
application process
Some deadlines are as early as Oct. 1st
If the college offers rolling admissions they admit
the first good applicants that come along leaving
fewer slots for later applicants
If the college evaluates in one big pool, applying
early shows you are interested and they know that
stronger applicants tend to file early
Early Decision vs. Early Action




Both require students to apply by an early deadline - usually
between October 15th and December 1st
Decisions are usually rendered between December 15 and
February 1
Borderline students are usually deferred and considered with
the regular applicant pool at a later date
Only students that have thoroughly investigated colleges and
completed most standardized testing by the end of the
eleventh grade with high test scores will be in a strong
position to consider early application
Early Decision



Early decision involves a BINDING DECISION to enroll if
accepted - you have to attend that school regardless of other
offers and without knowing any financial aid package that
may or may not be offered
You may only apply to one school through Early Decision and
if accepted, you must withdraw your applications to all other
schools
Early Decision offers a slight advantage of acceptance colleges usually accept a higher percentage of applicants than
those that apply for regular decision - colleges desire students
that really want to attend their school
Early Action




Entails NO commitment to enroll and therefore
offers little advantage for admission
Early Action students, however, are often first in
line for merit scholarships and housing
Competition in Early Action pools at highly
selective schools is generally tougher than in the
regular pool
Some Early Action colleges now ask that students
apply early only to their institution, however, you
may still apply regular decision to any other
institution
Your College Essay Can Make the Difference!!!

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




Admissions officers are looking for spark, vitality, wit,
sensitivity, originality, and signs of a lively mind
They want to know how well you can express yourself in
writing
Try to be as concise and specific as possible
Don’t waste words that aren’t essential to your point
Reread the essay several times for word choice and typos
If you have time - put your essay aside for a few weeks and
reread again to see if it still makes sense
When talent, GPA, and test scores are equal - the essay will
often determine who is chosen for admittance
College Essays





Show, don’t tell - a skillful writer lets evidence show that a proposition is
true; a clumsy one tells because his writing is not powerful enough to show
Use your own experiences - put yourself in the starring role and use your
own real life thoughts and feelings. Give the reader a piece of your mind
Use the first person - the better the reader gets to know you as a person the
more likely you will be admitted
Begin with a flourish - the most important sentence in your essay is the
first one; hook the reader with a first sentence that surprises and piques
interest to read further – polish that first sentence until it sparkles!!!!
Proofread - nothing is more damaging than an essay sull of typoes, speling
misteaks, and grammar that ain’t no good
Common Application Essay
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Evaluate a significant experience, achievement, risk you have
taken, or ethical dilemma you have faced and its impact on you.
Discuss some issue of personal, local, national, or international
concern and its importance to you.
Indicate a person who has had a significant influence on you, and
describe that influence.
Describe a character in fiction, a historical figure, or a creative
work (as in art, music, science, etc.) that has had an influence on
you, and explain that influence.
A range of academic interests, personal perspectives, and life
experiences adds much to the educational mix. Given your
personal background, describe an experience that illustrates what
you would bring to the diversity in a college community or an
encounter that demonstrated the importance of diversity to you.
Topic of your choice.
Recommendations







Letters of recommendation matter because of substance, not because of who
is writing them
They should tell the committee something about you as a person that comes
out nowhere else in your application
Find people who are familiar with your goals and aspirations and can write
about you in vivid detail
You will not be able to see the recommendation before it is sent
Most selective colleges require one recommendation from a teacher - pick
one who has taught you in your junior or senior year, who can testify to
some of your deeper and less obvious qualities
In general, do not send more recommendations than the application calls
for
October 1st is the deadline to ask teachers to write a letter of
recommendation
How To Use Your Red Folder




During your senior class meeting, each student will receive a
red folder with a cover sheet and additional information
inside
Please write on the cover sheet the date that you turn the
folder into your counselor or teacher
You must submit this folder to your counselor at least 10
school days in advance of your first application deadline in
order to give us time to process your applications
Send the actual application and fees separately (online or
through the mail). Do not submit money or checks to the
guidance office
The Red Folder - Front Cover



Complete all information requested on the
front cover
When listing what is inside your folder, only
list what is actually being turned in that day
and not all of the colleges you are applying to
for the whole year
The order colleges are listed on the front cover
needs to be the order they are inside the folder
from earliest due date to the latest
The Red Folder - Inside Contents
LEFT SIDE OF FOLDER



Letter to your counselor
stating information
about you that we may
not be aware of and is
not on your resume
Resume
Any information that
will help us write a rich
and substantial letter of
recommendation
RIGHT SIDE OF FOLDER


Secondary School Report,
Counselor Form, or
Curriculum Verification
Form, Scholarship
Applications
Manila Envelope with Stamps
for Postage
Large - 4-5 stamps


Paper-clip forms to envelope
Place forms and envelopes in
the order they are listed on
the front cover page
Name
Address
Phone Number
Email
Personal Information
Magnet
College major
Career goals
GPA (weighted/unweighted)
Total # AP courses taken
Test scores
Awards
Extracurricular
Leadership
Academic
Attendance
Extracurricular
Clubs
Sports
Music/arts
Leadership
Offices held—describe leadership roles/activities involved in leading/creating/etc.
Community Service
Volunteering
Work Experience
References
Red Folder
Letter to Your Counselor/Teacher

Include additional information that is not on your resume

You should include more personal information

Explain what is unique about you

Describe your strengths and weaknesses

Describe any hardships you have overcome



Describe how the university would benefit from accepting you
- what special traits do you have that will benefit the school
Who has been your greatest influence in life and how have
they have helped shape the kind of person you are
What are you passionate about and why?
The Red Folder – Common Applications



Make sure you indicate which schools need the common
application
The common application usually requests counselors to
submit on line – when you finish filling out your portion
of the Common Application, there should be a feature
that allows you to send an invitation to your counselor to
submit the Secondary School Report online.
The counselor will receive an email from you at this
point which requests them to fill out the Secondary
School Report Online.
Stamps, Official Transcripts, School Profile



Make sure you bring in stamps for anything that has to
be mailed to a college you are applying to or to
organizations/corporations that sponsor scholarships
All transcripts sent to colleges are OFFICIAL - inside a
sealed envelope with the principal’s signature and
official school seal
In addition to the above, we are required to send a
school profile with your transcript – the profile
highlights the school’s grading scale and important
statistics about our academic curriculum, test scores,
and student body
FINANCIAL AID &
SCHOLARSHIP
INFORMATION
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tY7yPIcxkV
Q&feature=player_detailpage
Kentucky Educational Excellence
Scholarships (KEES)

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The state of Kentucky rewards students for good grades
2.5 is the minimum GPA you have to earn in a year to
receive KEES money
15 is the minimum ACT score to receive additional funds
Better grades and higher ACT scores earn you more
dollars
Students on free/reduced lunch may earn additional
bonus funds for passing AP classes and exams
The funds can be used at any college in Kentucky
Types of Financial Aid – Merit Based Aid




Awarded solely on the basis of academic record or
outstanding ability in many areas
Usually merit aid starts with GPA’s around 3.8
and ACT scores around 28 or is based entirely on
your college audition
The amount of aid increases with higher scores
Each college sets it’s own criteria for granting
merit based aid - search the scholarship section of
their websites
University of Louisville
General Admission ( 24 ACT; 2.5 GPA)
Honors Program: (28 ACT or 1250 SAT; and 3.5 GPA)
Competitive Scholarships
 Brown Fellows (31 ACT or 1360 SAT and 3.35 GPA)
 McConnell (Based on academic merit and leadership, 3.35 GPA)
 Grawemeyer (31 ACT or 1360 SAT and 3.75 GPA)
 Vogt Hallmark (30 ACT or 1330 SAT and 3.75 GPA)
 Trustee’s Scholarship (25 ACT or 1130 SAT and 3.35 GPA)
 Eagle/Gold Scout (25 ACT or 1130 SAT and 3.35 GPA)
 Woodford Porter (African American students selected on merit, leadership &
service
Guaranteed Entrance Programs (Requirements to Apply):
 Medical School (30 ACT and 3.75 GPA)
 Dentistry (30 ACT and 3.75 GPA)
 Law School (24 ACT and 3.35 GPA)
 Nursing (25 ACT and 3.35 GPA)
 Communication Art & Design (24 ACT and 3.2 GPA)
Types of Financial Aid – Need Based Aid


Need is the difference between what it costs to attend a school
and what you and your family are expected to pay
You might think of this as a formula:
Cost of Education
-
Expected Family Contribution
Need


The Expected Family Contribution is calculated through use
of the FAFSA
In order to receive any financial aid you must fill out the
FAFSA
The FAFSA




FAFSA stands for Free Application for Federal
Student Aid
The form requests financial information for the
2012 calendar year
Colleges use the FAFSA to determine eligibility for
financial aid, including scholarships, grants, loans,
and work study programs
The State and Federal government will use the
FAFSA to determine eligibility for grants and loans
http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/
The Academic Common Market



If the program you are interested in isn’t offered
in Kentucky, you may be able to pay in-state
tuition at an out-of-state school through the
Academic Common Market.
Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Kentucky,
Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Oklahoma,
South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West
Virginia participate at the undergraduate and
graduate levels.
Florida, North Carolina, and Texas participate at
the graduate level.
Financial Aid & Scholarship Myths
1. Myth:
Since most schools will offer you an aid
package based on your need, there’s little
reason to shop around
Truth:
Colleges have very different ways of dealing
with your “need.” They can manipulate their
offers based on how much they want you to
attend their school, offering more in grants
and less in loans, for example. If you receive a
better offer of aid from one of your schools,
you should by all means let the other schools
know and see if you can use that information
to receive a better offer.
2. Myth:
College costs consist of room, board, and
tuition
Truth:
When calculating college costs, you must add
in tuition, room, board, fees, books,
transportation, clothing, entertainment, and
the 10% rule – take whatever you think a year
will cost and add 10% to cover the numerous
unexpected costs associated with college
attendance, as well as inflation
Financial Aid & Scholarship Myths
3. Myth:
Once you get a financial aid
package from your chosen
school, you can’t change it
4. Myth:
All scholarships are more-orless legitimate, so it’s a good
idea to apply to as many as fit
your profile
Truth:
Actually, you will be renewing
your financial aid package
each year, and it’s not
unheard of for more money to
become available, especially
for high-achieving students
Truth:
There are many scholarship
scams out there, so beware
How Much Will College Cost?








Tuition - payment for required courses, study abroad, exchange
programs
Fees - registration, parking, activities, health, laboratory, many
others
Books and Materials - computer, required texts and supplies
Room - cost of dorm or apartment plus furniture, utilities, internet
access, and telephone
Food - meal plans, eating out, groceries
Transportation - two to three trips home or, if you keep an auto on
campus, your gas expenses, insurance, parking fees, etc.
Personal - clothes, laundry, recreation, medical and dental,
insurance
Miscellaneous - catchall for anything that doesn’t fit in another
category - think about adding 10% of the total amount of above
University of Louisville




Tuition
Room Rates (avg. cost)
Meal Plans (avg. cost)
Books (avg. cost)
TOTAL
$9,466 ($4,733 per sem.)
$4,650
$2,920
$1,000
$18,036
The Net Price Calculator




Available since the 2011-2012 school year on every
college website
Provides students and parents with the college’s annual
cost of education
Also provides an easy estimation of what your financial
aid package may look like
The Net Price Calculator will be fairly accurate, but does
not substitute for actually going through the process of
submitting your FAFSA Form
College Costs








The cost of attending the most prestigious colleges for four years is nearing $200,000
- more than double the price of 20 years ago.
Tuition at public universities has risen more than 50% in inflation adjusted dollars in
the past ten years.
As college costs have risen, government aid has failed to keep pace - as a result,
student debt has ballooned.
Persistence - continue to apply regardless of setbacks and rejections; if you apply for
95 scholarships you may only win a very few but they may be just the amount you
need to make the difference
Creativity - adapt methods to pay to your own situation
You don’t necessarily have to be Einstein, Van Gogh, Pavarotti, or Peyton Manning,
but you do have to be a detective
Finding scholarships is like a game of “Where’s Waldo?”
There are scholarships for almost everything:
bagpipe players
people under 4 feet tall
majors in parapsychology
women who want to be engineers
So How Do You Win Scholarships?





You must be able to organize and prioritize
You must be able to write about a variety of topics that may or may
not be exciting to you in a fluid and thoughtful way, demonstrating
that you are a scholar or would like to be a scholar
You must understand yourself well enough to create a compelling
portrait of who you are.
You must understand your audience well enough to be able to
position your skills and strengths as deserving of their support.
Scholarship committees award funding to candidates they can
understand and relate to and who distinguish themselves from
other candidates by their ability to communicate.
When to Start Looking



The senior year is the time to APPLY for scholarship, not
LOOK for them … You don’t have time!
You need to be searching NOW!
Explore the financial aid and scholarship pages on college
websites you are interested in

Explore free scholarship search websites

Learn what is out there so you will be ready your senior year


Read books, articles, start a college savings account as soon as
possible
Begin compiling a list of possibilities
Start With A Personal Inventory

Year in school, citizenship, state of residence, religion, ethnic background, disability, military
status, employer, membership organizations

Do you want to be in a competition? What are you talents and interests?

What subject do you plan to major in?

What career do you plan to pursue?

Do you want to apply for all types of aid or only scholarships?

Research local scholarships first – check your email/school website/PTSA electronic newsletter

Check the college aid section of your public library – scholarship handbooks


Check out the national scholarships such as National Merit, Gates Millennium, Intel Science
Search, Coca-Cola Scholars, Ron Brown, etc.
Check out your membership organizations, employers, religious, community service, fraternal,
military, union, and professional groups

Check out fast food companies, department stores, supermarkets, awards related to employment

Use the internet for free scholarship searches

Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority – KHEAA

Research Institutional Scholarships – automatic, merit, talent, financial need, intended major,
departmental, ethnicity, or a variety of other factors
The Scholarship Application







Read the eligibility criteria carefully (GPA, test scores, other)
Collect all supporting documents early (transcripts, recommendations,
resume, etc.).
Ask the person writing your recommendation to address your personal
qualities that match the scholarship criteria with specific examples; If the
recommender would not know about these examples, then you have to tell
them in a letter
If you are asked to document your financial need, list all family obligations
and then explain your situation honestly and completely
Be neat, thorough, and creative!
There may be thousands of students competing for the same scholarship take it seriously and write essays with your most distinguished effort.
Don’t miss the application deadline!
10 Tips for Writing Effective Scholarship Essays
1.
2.
Read the instructions and make sure you understand them before you start writing
Think about what you are going to write and organize your thoughts before you
start writing
3.
Begin the process by writing an outline
4.
Make sure your outline touches on every aspect required per the instructions
5.
Write your essay by elaborating on each of the points in your outline
6.
Use clear, concise and simple language throughout the essay
7.
State your accomplishments without coming across as if you are bragging
8.
Make sure your grammar and spelling are impeccable
9.
10.
Read the question again and then read your essay to be certain that the essay
addresses every point
Have someone with strong writing and editing skills proofread the essay before
you submit it
School Websites







www.dupontmanual.com
Click on Counselors
Click on Senior Scholarships
Start Browsing
www.ypas.org
Click on Counselor Connection
Click on Scholarship Information
The Power of the Internet

www.louisvillescholarships.com

hispanicscholaship.com

adventuresineducation.org

iefa.org

brokescholar.com

internationalscholarships.com

cappex.com


careersandcolleges.com

clubscholarship.com

salliemae.com

collegeanswer.com

scholarships.com

collegenet.com

scholarships101.com

collegescholaships.com

scholarships4you.com

fastaid.com

scholarships.kachinatech.com

fastweb.com

studentsawards.com

finaid.org

supercollege.com

free-4u.com

wiredscholar.com

gocollege.com

zinch.com
http://aid.military.com/search-forscholarhips.do
Scholarship Sources

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

Big Businesses
Professional Organizations
Extracurricular Activities
Workers Unions
Religious Organizations
Service Clubs
Parents Employer
Parent’s or Grandparents Military
Service
Student’s Employer
Businesses Big and Small - check
with the Chamber of Commerce
The College Financial Aid Office
Career Service Offices
Visit Your College Department’s
Administrative Assistant
Contact Your Local Politician









Search the Courier Journal Website
for Scholarship Announcements
Scholarship Books
Dollars for Scholars - double your
scholarship dollars at
www.scholarshipamerica.org
Scholarships based on Personal
Challenges and Hardships
Turn Your Hobbies and Talents into
Scholarships
Scholarship organizations love
Leaders - check into Leadership
Awards
Turn Your Community Service into
Scholarship Dollars
Ace your College Application to Get
More Scholarship Dollars
Negotiate with your college if they try
to take away your scholarship money
Scholarship To Do List:






Contact the financial aid counselors at your selected colleges to determine
what scholarships they offer.
Watch the deadlines – some are as early as the fall semester and some are
in October.
Keep applying. Check to determine if any essay you’ve written can be used
for more than one award. Be careful not to get carried away with this – you
might waste time and lose money.
Follow the directions of the application to the letter. Omitting information
can disqualify you.
Ask for letters of recommendation early.
Notify the college you’ve decided to attend of scholarships you will be
receiving (after they have offered your financial aid package and you have
accepted what you want from the package).
Insider Tips





Remember the 10% Rule – total costs of a college, then add 10% to account
for unexpected expenses.
Start Early – start working with the financial aid office even before being
admitted.
Non-citizens be prepared. It is even more difficult to receive financial aid if
you are not a U.S. Citizen because most colleges have little to no funds
available for such students
Ask and Ask Again – If your financial aid package will not cover your costs,
contact the financial aid office and ask them to review your application.
Beware of Scams – any scholarship fund that requests an application fee,
operates out of a residence, guarantees you a return, or has a name
suspiciously close to an organization you know to be legitimate, is probably
a scam. Research funds thoroughly before sending money
Questions?


Please see your counselor if you have
any questions.
This PowerPoint and other
information will be posted on
Manual’s website under the Counselor
tab, and click on College & Career
Center.

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