Homeless Education 101 - Region 10 Education Service Center

Report
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Spend anytime discussing the moral or
ethical pros and cons with regards to
providing services to the homeless.
Homeless Education History
 Homeless Liaisons
 Definition
 Required Services
 Unaccompanied Youth
 Other
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Federal
› McKinney-Vento Act
› McKinney-Vento Federal Guidance
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State
› Texas Education Code
› TEA Legal Guidance
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Other
› Local/TASB Policy
Nine titles within the act
 Title VII addresses
education
 Signed into law in 1987
 Largest amendment took
place in 2002 as it
became part of NCLB
 Named after Stewart
McKinney & Bruce Vento

Identification
 Enrollment & Success
 Head Start and Pre-K
 Health, Mental Health & Dental Care
 Informing Parents and Posting Rights
 Dispute Resolution
 Immunizations
 Unaccompanied Youth

Lack a….
FIXED
 REGULAR
 ADEQUATE
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Nighttime residence
Column 79
 0= Not Homeless
 1= Sheltered
 2= Doubled-Up
 3= Unsheltered
 4= Hotel/Motel
Column 80
 0= Not Unaccompanied
 1= Unaccompanied & Receiving
Services Under a MV Program
 2= Unaccompanied & NOT Receiving
Services Under a MV Program
Written Explanation of the Decision
 Immediate Enrollment While Dispute is
Resolved
 All Services While Dispute is Resolved
 Arrangements at the Same School
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Written notice should include:
› Contact information for the local homeless education
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liaison
A simple, detachable form that parents, guardians, or
unaccompanied youth can complete and turn in to the
school to initiate the dispute resolution process; the school
should copy the form and return the copy to the parent,
guardian, or youth for their records when it is submitted.
A step-by-step description of how to dispute the school’s
decision
Notice of the right to enroll immediately in the requested
school pending resolution of dispute
Notice that “immediate enrollment” includes full
participation in all school activities
Sample Letter
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Automatic Eligibility
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Letter from Homeless Liaison with a list of
names is sufficient documentation
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Comparable Service
Immediate Enrollment
 Even if Lacking Proper Paperwork
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Proof of Residency
Guardianship
Immunizations
Birth Certificate
School Records
Federal Law: SoO or Local
 Texas Education Code: Any
 Dispute Resolution
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Evaluate the Housing Status of All
Students at a Regular Interval
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Student Residency Questionnaires
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Incomplete or Confusing Forms
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School of Origin
› The term ‘school of origin’ means the school
that the child or youth attended when
permanently housed OR the school in which
the youth was last enrolled.
› Students can possibly have 2 schools of
origin.
School of Origin
Suzy’s family was
recently evicted and
had to move into a
shelter in a neighboring
district.
Which school is the school
of origin?
A
What are this student’s
options for transportation?
School of Origin from
A, or as a comparable
service from B
Where can this student
enroll?
Anywhere in Texas
that is in their best
interest
School of Origin
Suzy decided to enroll in
District B.
Recently, Suzy’s mother
got a job at a temple near
District C.
Which school is the school
of origin?
A&B
What are this student’s
options for transportation?
School of Origin from
A, or as a comparable
service from B
Where can this student
enroll?
Anywhere in Texas
that is in their best
interest
School of Origin
Suzy decided to enroll in District
C. Eventually, they were able to
get in a shelter closer to district C.
After 2 months, she decided she
did not like District C and is
thinking of moving to district D.
Which school is the school
of origin?
A&C
What are this student’s
options for transportation?
School of Origin from
A, or as a comparable
service from C
Where can this student
enroll?
Anywhere in Texas
that is in their best
interest
Determining Feasibility
 Related to Enrollment
 More Factors Than Distance
 Case by Case Basis
 Written Notice for Denial
 Dispute Resolution
 Keep Records
Determining the Method
 School Bus
 District Vans & SUVs
 Contracted Transportation Services
 Public Transportation
 Shelter Transportation
 Reimbursement to Parents
 Other (Possibly SPED)
Common Concerns
 After School- Comparable
 DAEP- Comparable (Unless SoO)
 Pre-School- Comparable
 2-Mile Radius- Comparable (Unless SoO)
 Discipline- Comparable & Written Policy
 No Exception for High Mobility
 No Transportation-Still Must Provide
 Field Trips/ Testing- Use other funds, Title-I
A Test
Other services via Title I,
part A-Set Aside
 School Supplies
 Health Related Needs
 Field Trip Costs
 School Uniforms/Clothing
 Tutoring/Educational Aides
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
 PEIMS 100 Record Column 80 Indicates Unaccompanied
 0= Not Unaccompanied
 1= Unaccompanied and Receiving Services Under M-V
 2= Unaccompanied and Not Receiving Services Under M-V
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
Homeless
Unaccompanied
Students not with legal guardians
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
 Unaccompanied Youth. The term unaccompanied youth
includes a youth not in the physical custody of a parent or
guardian. This would include youth living in runaway shelters,
abandoned buildings, cars, on the streets, or in other
inadequate housing and children and youth denied housing
by their families (sometimes referred to as “throwaway”
children and youth) (Federal Guidance)
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
In 1938, Huey, Dewey and Louie
are sent to live with Uncle
Donald because their father was
in the hospital and their
mother, Della Duck (Donald’s
twin sister), could not
care for them.
Homeless & Unaccompanied
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
By 1941, the boys had
permanently moved in with Donald.
However, guardianship transfer was
never sought.
Students not with legal guardians
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
In 1987, Donald joined the navy.
He made a plan with his Uncle,
Scrooge McDuck, to watch the
boys while he was away.
Students not with legal guardians
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
Homeless & Unaccompanied
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
 1 in 10 report being raped
 1 in 100 die each year, the vast majority from suicide
 75% report at least one parent who abused drugs or alcohol
 20-40% were sexually abused in their homes
 40-60% were physically abused
 Many youth have been thrown out because of their sexual
orientation (20-40% identify as LGBT)
 10% of currently homeless female teenagers are pregnant
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
 Homeless Liaisons
 parent or guardian (or in the case of an unaccompanied
youth, the liaison)
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
 UIL
 Homeless students need their school administrator to apply to
the UIL for a waiver of residence if the student plans to
participate in varsity athletics.
 Residence rules for athletic varsity eligibility are found in Section
440 (b) and 442 of the Constitution and Contest Rules.
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
 Health/Immunizations
 Immediate referral to HoLi
 Age 16 and up can consent to own medical treatment (FC)
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
 Tex. Fam. Code § 32.003: Consent to Treatment by Child
(a) A child may consent to medical, dental, psychological, and
surgical treatment for the child by a licensed physician or dentist if
the child:
(2) is:
(A) 16 years of age or older and resides separate and apart from
the child's parents, managing conservator, or guardian, with or
without the consent of the parents, managing conservator, or
guardian and regardless of the duration of the residence; and
(B) managing the child's own financial affairs, regardless of the
source of the income;
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
 Grades and Credit Recovery
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90% rule has exceptions
Encouraged to get creative
TXVSN is an option
Flexible Schedules (Mobile, AL and Anchorage, AK)
Review transcripts to see if credit can be given
Award credit for employment
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
 Texas Codes > Education Code > Title 2 > Subtitle E > Chapter 25 > Subchapter C >25.092
(a-1) A student who is in attendance for at least 75 percent but less than 90 percent of the days a class is
offered may be given credit for the class if the student completes a plan approved by the school's principal
that provides for the student to meet the instructional requirements of the class. A student under the
jurisdiction of a court in a criminal or juvenile justice proceeding may not receive credit under this subsection
without the consent of the judge presiding over the student's case.
(b) The board of trustees of each school district shall appoint one or more attendance committees to hear
petitions for class credit by students who are in attendance fewer than the number of days required under
Subsection (a) and have not earned class credit under Subsection (a-1). Classroom teachers shall comprise
a majority of the membership of the committee. A committee may give class credit to a student because of
extenuating circumstances. Each board of trustees shall establish guidelines to determine what constitutes
extenuating circumstances and shall adopt policies establishing alternative ways for students to make up
work or regain credit lost because of absences. The alternative ways must include at least one option that
does not require a student to pay a fee authorized under Section 11.158(a)(15). A certified public school
employee may not be assigned additional instructional duties as a result of this section outside of the regular
workday unless the employee is compensated for the duties at a reasonable rate of pay.
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
 Truancy and Drop-Out
 Method for reviewing absences?
 Which are related to homelessness and which are not?
 What are the students’ expectations of themselves?
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
 ARD Meetings and Special Education
 Legal framework (ESC18) assigns a surrogate
 Also defines “parent” broadly
 “An individual acting in the place of a biological or adoptive
parent (including a grandparent, stepparent, or other relative)
with whom the child lives, or an individual who is legally
responsible for the child's welfare”
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
 FAFSA and Post-Secondary Education
 Unaccompanied Homeless students meet the definition of
“Independent Student”
 Verification can be made by the HoLi (Sample Letter)
 Youth who are in foster care at any time after age 13 are also
considered independent students
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
 Foster Care and CPS
 Students who run away from Foster Care are considered
Homeless
 Students who are awaiting Foster Care Placement are
considered Homeless
 When do I call CPS? (FC)
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
 SSI, TANF, Medicaid, Housing etc.
 SSI
 Student must be disabled
 Ages 16-18 can apply on their own
 Food Stamps
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No age minimum
No parent signature required
No denial based on lack of address of ID
Eligibility is based on household not family
Couch Surfing youth are considered their own household
Educating Unaccompanied and
Homeless Youth
 SSI, TANF, Medicaid, Housing etc.
 TANF
 Large barriers for Unaccompanied Youth
 Medicaid
 Most students would qualify
 Youth under the age of 21 who are financially eligible but not
“dependent children” (i.e. because they do not live with parents).
Financial eligibility levels vary greatly among states, but are often very
low. Parental income is not considered if the youth does not live with
parents.
 Housing
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Policy
Procedure
Protocol
Practice
Plan
Process
Steps
Method
Arrangement
System
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Strategy
Course
Order
Habitude
Manner
Mode
Praxis
Approach
Scheme
Recipe

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