Bouman GRiSP November 20 2014

Report
GRiSP: does it meet
expectations and where do we
go next?
Bas Bouman, Director GRiSP, IRRI Seminar, Nov 20, 2014
Reminder…
•
A CGIAR Research Program
•
A global partnership led by IRRI
•
Coordinating and founding partners: IRRI,
AfricaRice, CIAT, CIRAD, IRD, and JIRCAS
•
Shared vision, goals, objectives, R&D
•
For a value of ≈100 M $/year (CGIAR only)
•
Current phase: 2011-2015
Content
• What works well (2x)
• What can be strengthened (2x)
• Towards GRiSP II
What works well: value adding
1: Alignment and synergies
Leveraging global knowledge
Pathology
Markers
Belgium
-University
-University
Abiotic
stress
-IRD
- CIRAD
Germany
Abiotic
stress
France
USA
- Cornell U.
- U. Arizona
-Duke U.
JAPAN
-NIAS
- NICS
- JIRCAS
Markers
Donor
Pathology
AfricaRice
IRRI
Genomics
Germplasm
Breeding lines
Markers, etc
NARS
CIAT
Embrapa
Breeding
lines
- Shuttle Breeding
- Breeding TF
- Hub
M Wopereis, GRiSP OC meeting November, 2014
Breeding
lines
China
Breeding Task Force Africa
Internal
Breeding Program
IRRI
Promising
lines
Internal
Breeding Program
CIAT
Internal
Breeding Program
NARS in Africa
Promising
lines
Promising
lines
Internal
Breeding Program
AfricaRice
Fixed breeding lines with data supporting performance
Africa Wide Rice Breeding Task Force (MET)
Country decision to release
Breeding Task Force Annual Meeting 2014, Feb 25-26, 2014 Cotonou, Benin
Promising
lines
Nominations for MET
Breeding Task Force presentation, M Sie, STRASA meeting, Senegal, 2013
ARICAs nominated in 2014
Breeding Line
Ecology
Appealing point
Lowland
Fe toxicity
tolerance
Lowland
Irrigated
Fe toxicity
tolerance
Burkina Faso
Ghana
Lowland
Irrigated
Cold tolerance
Senegal
WAT 1046-B-43-2-2-2
Lowland
Irrigated
Fe toxicity
tolerance
Guinea
Burkina Faso
Cote d'Ivoire
SIM2 SUMADEL
Lowland
Irrigated
Cold tolerance
Mali
Senegal
WAS 200-B-B-1-1-1
Lowland
Irrigated
Cold tolerance
Mali
Senegal
Mangrove
Salt tolerance
Gambia
IR75887-1-3-WAB1
WAS 21-B-B-20-4-3-3
IR 63275-B-1-1-1-3-3-2
Country
Guinea
Ghana
Cote d'Ivoire
AfricaRice Science Week 2014, Cotonou, February 24- 27, 2014
Hybrid Rice Consortium Latin America
IRRI to CIAT => partners
 Original females pre HRDC
 New CMS pairs
 Selection of R Lines
 Selection of B lines
CIAT to IRRI
 CT Elite Lines for testing at IRRI
 Two hybrids included in HRDC MYT
 R lines
 Testing in Santa Rosa
GRiSP Phenotyping Network
Anaerobic
Chem
YP, Chem,
Aerobic rice
Panicle structure
YP flooded rice
YP aerobic & upland
Analytics
Heat
Cold,
YP, phenology
YP, Heat
YP, photosynthesis,
YP Aerobic rice, anatomy,
Panicle structure
Chem
Aerobic
Hi-altitude
(ORYTAGE)
Chem
Dissecting GxE using ORYZA2000
High stem biomass translocation
to the panicles after flowering
C. Rebolledo, D. Jimenez, CIAT, September 2014
High biomass production
after flowering
Predicting yield loss due to BLB current and future climates
A230
A250
RICEPEST and EPIRICE
A1B30
A1B50
B130
B150
Tanzania
Crop management advice
IRRI
AfricaRice
Rice mapping
IRRI
AfricaRice
2: Strong outcome orientation
From mission…
• Reduce poverty and hunger
• Improve human health and nutrition
• Reduce the environmental footprint and
enhance the ecosystem resilience of
rice production systems
…to objectives…
To increase rice productivity through
development of improved varieties and
other technologies along the value chain
To foster more sustainable rice-based
production systems that use resources
more efficiently
To improve the efficiency and equity of the
rice sector through better and more
accessible information and strengthened
delivery mechanisms
…to development outcomes…
1. Increased production that meets local and
global demand
2. Increased profitability producers and
affordability consumers
3. Increased efficiency and value added along
value chain
4. Increased sustainability and reduced
environmental footprint
5. Increased health and nutrition from rice and
diversification
6. Increased capacity and resilience in the rice
sector
7. Increased gender equity,
…to full IP and Theory of Change
IDOs increased food security
reduced poverty, increased,
sustainability
Increased
productivity
Large numbers
of farmers adopt
Large scale
dissemination
Collaborative partner
adopters, and
benefits seen
Pilot site farmer
adopters, and
benefits seen
Assumptions and risks
Assumption:
product actually
delivers its benefits
Assumption: product responds to
a need on large scale; benefits
accrue to adopters
Risk: practices are not adopted
Assumptions: partners disseminate
product; benefits accrue to
adopters
Risk: products not adopted
Assumption: product responds to
farmers’ needs
Risk: product not adopted
Product
Enabling actions
See early action at
development of improved
practice
Awareness campaigns,
demonstration fields,
marketing by private sector,
penetrate remote areas
(identification of target domain
– see below)
Involvement of partners in
product development;
capacity building of partners;
development of business
models; demonstrated
benefits to adopters
Conduct of Needs and
Opportunities Assessments;
target domain identification,
involvement of farmers in
development of product
(participatory approaches);
develop technologies with local
R&D partners, scientific evidence
that porduct ‘works’
Impact at three scales
GRiSP enabling
actions
Global
National
District,
province
Local
research
Interm
ediate
users
Action site
End users
(farmers,
valuechain
actors)
GRiSP products
and services
GRISP OUTCOME
OUTCOME INDICATOR
1. Food security –
Rice Production
National: rice production, consumption, and import/export
volumes; rice area; yield; yield gap; domestic rice price
Acton site: yield; yield gap; adoption rates of improved
rice varieties and practices to close yield gap; adoption
rates of practices and machinery to reduce postproduction losses
2. Poverty
(producers income,
consumers
expenses)
National: rice price; economic producer and consumer
surplus (modeled)
4. Sustainability
and environmental
footprint
National: ??
Action site: cost of production; local rice price; farmer
profitability; adoption rates of improved rice varieties,
production and post-production practices
Action site: Increased resource use efficiencies (water,
nutrients, etc); reduced emission of greenhouse gases,
pesticide residues, water and air pollution; adoption rates
of improved practices
Yield gap simulations
Crop modeling like this
is complicated, but more
powerful than statistical
or empirical methods.
It is an excellent
platform for food
security scenarios, yield
gap analysis, targeting.
The map on left is the
actual yield per province.
The map on right is the
obtainable yield.
It also shows yield
histograms for different
management and
environmental situations
within each province.
A Nelson, IRRI BOT meeting November, 2014
Rice Sector Development Hubs, Africa
2.1
1.7
1.6
4.0
2.4
1.9
Irrigated lowland
Rainfed lowland
M Wopereis, GRiSP OC meeting November, 2014
Rainfed upland
What can be strengthened?
1: GRiSP themes
Disciplinary Themes constrain interdisciplinary
research.
Current themes too “technocratic”?
Collaboration across continents and centers can still
be strengthened
Theme leaders need to be better resourced and
empowered; clarity on role global Theme Leader
2: Partnerships
Capturing outcomes by GRiSP partners:
• Little reporting of NonCGIAR center achievements;
• Capturing boundary partner achievements
Documentation of value adding
• Strength of partnerships; 900+?
• Enhanced collaboration and synergy
• Results of this
Designing improvements
GRiSP adaptations now
Improve empowerment theme leaders: more
resources, clarify roles and responsibilities
Thematic workshops started in 2014: foster
collaboration and generation of ideas
Theme leader meetings => inter theme
collaboration
Engage nonCGIAR partners in reporting; internal
workshops for enhanced visibility
Mapping partnerships by Institutional Learning
and Change Initiative (ILAC) in 2015
GRiSP Extension Proposal 2016
Approval by Fund Council
November, 6, 2014
Builds on Impact Pathways,
Theories of Change, IDOs,
indicator framework
T4 => T2, T3, T6
T3 => rice value chain
A strong GRiSP II 2017-20..
Agreement to develop a strong GRiSP II
Looking forward: Drivers of change and foresight
=> what does this mean for GRiSP II?
Respond to priorities, goals, objectives, outcomes
of CGIAR (Strategy and Results Framework);
strong donor input
Respond to rice sector development priorities of
our partner countries and stakeholders
Typical CGIAR center ‘niche’ (plus partners)
Focused agenda; strategic use of W1,2 funds
GRiSP II R&D structure
Two R&D structures for further exploration:
1. Current Themes
2. Themes that are less disciplinary; maybe
production/cropping systems basis, socio-economic
agro-ecologies
Value-chain approach; vertical integration
Use Theory of Change and Impact Pathway;
implement strong M&E; feed back loops
Rice value chains in Africa
Products &
Services:
Suitability,
Reliability,
Affordability…
M Wopereis, GRiSP OC meeting November, 2014
Partnerships /
MSPs:
Trust,
Win-Win,
Equity…
Planning GRiSP II – next steps
•
•
•
•
•
Dec/Jan 2015: CIAT Rice planning
Jan 26-30: IRRI planning
February 9-12: AfricaRice planning
Cirad, IRD, JIRCAS
February 23-27: LAC Rice Conference Brazil: PPMT
bring results together
•
Senior research management meeting (Theme
leaders, focal persons)
Stakeholder engagement (continues process)
•
•
External review: preliminary report July 2015,
final report October 2015
Thanks for your attention
Example: Rice deltas
Foresight: population increase; urbanization;
megacities; urban poverty and food security; demand
high quality & diverse food; rural labor scarcity;
mechanization; land consolidation; private sector
presence; market-oriented farming; env. issues: CC
=> sea level rise; land loss; water scarcity and
degradation; ecosystem services
Example: Rice deltas
GRiSP research domain: “Coastal zones and inland
deltas”: rice main crop; rice production (volume); high
quality and value added; low GI rice; export
orientation; value-chain connection; PH losses; low
rice price for consumers; env. protection (water,
energy, nutrients, greenhouse gas reduction);
complement private sector in R&D; engage private
sector for technology dissemination
Example: Forgotten Hinterlands
Foresight: areas lagging behind; rural poverty and
home-food security; harsh environment; little private
sector; little advisory services; limited markets; NGOs;
especially vulnerable to climate change effects;
resilience needed; classical agricultural growth motor
of economic growth
Example: Forgotten Hinterlands
GRiSP research domain: “Unfavorable environments”:
improved technologies as stepping stone out of
poverty (vicious cycle); multiple crops; stress tolerant
varieties (drought, flood,st
salinity, etc); enhanced
IRRI
DG: Finish 1 Green Revolution
nutrition irt home consumption; CC adaptation;
enhancing resilience (insurance); market information;
seed system development; strengthen NARES capacity
all-round; support SMEs as engine of growth;
POORMINA
R-RF-68
R-RF-69
IR 70215-70-CPA-3
IR 74371-70-1-1
DGI
307
IR 74371-54-1-1
R-RF23
IR 70844-10-SRN-43-1-B
IR 72667-16-1-B-B-3
AR
B-6
IR 5541904
IR 74371-46-1-1

similar documents