Application and Learning from Household Vulnerability and

Report
Application and Learning
from Household Vulnerability
and Food Security Tools
FHI 360, DAI, Self Help Africa
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Overview
• Session objectives
• Meet the projects and partners
• Three projects implemented by FHI 360, DAI and Self-Help Africa
• Introduce vulnerability and food security tools
• DAI HEA, HEA/IHM, PPI, Household Hunger Score, Household
Dietary Diversity
• Discuss selection, adaptation and use of tools
and analysis
• Lessons learned and future directions
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Learning Objectives
• Learn about the objectives and purpose behind
vulnerability and food security assessments by different
projects and partners
• Learn about several household (HH) poverty and food
security measurement methods utilized
• Discuss selection, adaptation and lessons learned based
on use of the tools
Programming contexts: poor and economically vulnerable
HHs, cross-sectoral and technical assistance oriented
programs addressing household economic strengthening,
livelihoods and/or food security, serving HIV and AIDS affected
communities
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Uganda Community Connector
 Five year USAID Feed the
Future project (2011-16)
 Implemented by FHI360 –
as the Prime Contractor
 Sub-contractors -SHA, Brac;
CDFU, GF, Gulu University
and Mbarara University of
Science and Technology.
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Uganda Community Connector
1. Improve the nutritional status of
women and children, and;
2. Improve the livelihoods of vulnerable
populations in an equitable and
sustainable manner.
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Project Result Framework
CC project Goal: Improve nutrition and achieve food and livelihood
security through integrated nutrition and agriculture interventions
IR1: Improve nutritional status of
women and children
1.1: Households adopt improved
nutrition behaviors
1.2: Households adopt improved
hygiene behaviors
1.3: Households increase access
to more diverse and quality diets
1.4: Increase demand for later
timing and spacing of pregnancies
6
Project Result Framework
CC project Goal: Improve nutrition and achieve food and livelihood
security through integrated nutrition and agriculture interventions
IR2: Livelihoods of vulnerable
populations improved in equitable and
sustainable manner
2.1: Household’s assets, income and
consumption increased
2.2: Appropriate technologies to improve
productivity and post-harvest handling and
decrease women’s workload
2.3: Hhds and communities adopt improved
risk management techniques to mitigate shock
2.4: Vulnerable hhds linked to FtF
economic growth activities
2.5: Gender based constraints around
household decision making are reduced
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Uganda Community Connector
• Situation Analysis
– Household Economy Approach (adapted)
– Individual Household Method
• Monitoring and Evaluation/Baseline
– Progress out of Poverty Index
– Food Security Measures
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Tanzania IMARISHA
• Improving Multisectoral AIDS Responses to Incorporate Economic
Strengthening for Households Affected by AIDS (IMARISHA- to strengthen
in Kiswahili)
• 4-year, $5.99 million USAID and PEPFAR funded project (January 2011December 2014) implemented by DAI
• Objective: Improve the effectiveness of economic strengthening
approaches led by PEPFAR Community Care Partners and the Government
to mitigate the impact of HIV/AIDS on vulnerable households in Tanzania
• DAI serves as specialized TA provider to IPs and Government, linkage
facilitator to development partners, funder of innovation, convener or
multisectoral partners in civil society and government to address
economic issues within a health context
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Tanzania IMARISHA
• Original footprint: Dar es
Salaam, Dodoma, Iringa,
Mbeya, Morogoro,
Mwanza and Shinyanga
• Expanded due to partner
demand to: Kilimanjaro,
Tanga, Arusha, Singida,
Kigoma, Zanzibar, Pwani,
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Tanzania IMARISHA
• Rationale for Vulnerability and Food Security Assessment Household Economic Assessment (DAI-HEA)
– IMARISHA Initial Partner Assessment showed only 55% of MVC and HBC
partners assessed income or vulnerability… with caveats
– Limited data on economic constraints captured during partner baselines;
IMARISHA could be additive and capture more information for partners to use
for programming
– In some instances, partners not allowed to do HEA, e.g., those funded by CDC
– DAI wanted a rigorous baseline for our work as a TA provider and allow us to
monitor outcomes throughout the project
– Learn more about household vulnerability, resilience and allow us to have data
to test new approaches
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Livelihoods and Food Security
Technical Assistance Project (LIFT II)
•
•
•
•
Global TA Mechanism
USAID 2013-2018
Ceiling $24 million
PEPFAR
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Malawi
DRC
Nigeria
Lesotho
Namibia
Tanzania
Zambia
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Livelihoods and Food Security
Technical Assistance Project (LIFT II)
• Improved access to ES/L/FS services for clinical health and NACS
clients and families, through referrals and community support
services.
• Strengthened community services that provide ES/L/FS support as a
component of a continuum of care for families.
• Expanded evidence base for ES/L/FS programming impacts on
health and nutrition
• Provision of global technical leadership and strategic support to
improve the quality of ES/L/FS programs and activities that support
PEPFAR, GHI and FtF investments
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
LIFT MODEL FOR LINKING NACS with ES/L/FS
OPPORTUNITIES
Poverty &Food Security
Diagnostic Tool
Understand segmentation of
population to inform demand for
services
Organizational Network
Analysis (ONA)
Assesses supply of services
POVERTY AND FOOD SECURITY
DIAGNOSTIC TOOL
STEP 1
Conduct Poverty
& Food Security
Diagnostic w/
Health Facility
Client



Progress out of
Poverty Index
(PPI)
Household
Hunger Scale
(HHS)
Household
Dietary
Diversity Score
(HDDS)
STEP 2
STEP 3
STEP 4
Score diagnostic
results &
segment HH
based on 3 Ps
framework
Qualitative
interview/
counseling
based on
available
services
Make
informed
referral(s) to
services
 Provision
 Protection
 Promotion
 Preferences/
interests
 Skills
 Geography
 Time
constraints
 Other
priorities
Why Vulnerability and Food Security
Analysis?
Providing appropriate assistance to the households
based on their needs and resources
• Activity and intervention design
• Technical Assistance to implementing partners in
Economic Strengthening
• Assessing health client household vulnerability and
food security status to inform connection to
available services for improved food security,
improve adherence/retention
• Project and activity M&E (especially baselines)
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Vulnerability and Food Security
Approaches and Tools Utilized
• Household Economic Assessment (HEA),
modified by DAI
• Household Economy Approach (HEA by Save,
EDF)
• Individual Household Method (IHM)
• Progress out of Poverty (PPI)
• Household Hunger Scale (HHS)
• Household Dietary Diversity Scale (HDDS)
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Household Economy Approach (HEA)
and Individual Household Method (IHM)
• Household Economy Approach and Individual Household Method
– How people in different social and economic circumstances get the food and
cash they need
– Identify assets available, opportunities open to them and constraints they face
– Analysis of options open to them at times of crisis
– Analysis of the connections among different groups and different areas,
providing a picture of how assets are distributed within a community
– IHM subanalysis of HEA allows for a focus at the household level
HEA Website for more information
• Community Connector adapted it to inform Situation Analysis
– Definition of vulnerability by livelihood zones
– Development context/drivers of malnutrition and poverty
– How to break apart food security within vulnerable groups
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
DAI Household Economic Assessment
(DAI HEA)
HEA is a livelihoods-based framework for analyzing the way people obtain
access to the things they need to survive and prosper.
• HEAs typically try to answer 3 questions:
1. How people in different social and economic circumstances get the
food and cash they need;
2. What assets, opportunities are open to them and what constraints
they face; and
3. The options open to them at times of crisis
• HEA survey tool developed by DAI for use with PEPFAR Implementing
Partners (IPs)
Modeled on a survey instrument developed by SC-UK for food security
but updated to include other questions (E.g., HIV)
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Progress Out of Poverty Index (PPI)
• Poverty measurement tool developed by the
Grameen Foundation
• Video Introduction “What is the PPI?” (utilize link below)
http://www.progressoutofpoverty.org/about-ppi
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Household Hunger Scale (HHS) &
• Household hunger in food insecure areas
• Validated for cross-cultural use
Household Hunger Scale SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Household Dietary Diversity Score
(HDDS)
• Food access proxy
indicator
• Validated approach
• Useful when
resources for
measuring are
limited
Household Dietary Diversity Score
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Key Questions and Considerations in
Selecting Approaches
• What are the objectives and data needs?
• What do we want to do with the information
once we collect it?
• What existing approaches are out there and how
can we build off them?
• What are the gaps or what else is needed to meet
our objective?
• Who is doing data collection and what are the
requirements to use the approach?
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Types of Adaptation
• Streamlining and tailoring of approach or tool
• Customizing to local context
• Addressing gaps by supplementing (ie food
security, gender) or combining with other
approaches and tools
• Incorporate learning and experience (ie HEA+,
LIFT diagnostic tool)
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Small Group Discussion
• Selection: What and why?
• Adaptation of tools/approaches: How and why?
• Application: Experience utilizing the approaches
and analysis
–
–
–
–
Time taken, financial resources (high/low/med)
How useful/effective was it in meeting your objectives
Benefits and challenges
Lessons learned
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Discussion Q&A- What did you
hear/discuss in your group?
What does this mean for your work?
What considerations are there in other contexts and
programming? Where are these approaches going
next?
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches
Learn More
Uganda Community Connector
http://commconnector.org
LIFT II
http://theliftproject.org/
IMARISHA
http://dai.com/our-work/projects/tanzania--economic-strenghthening-households-affected-aidsimarisha
Contact Us
Robert Gensi [email protected]
Khalid Mgaramo [email protected]
Meaghan Murphy [email protected]
Robert Mwadime [email protected]
SEEP Annual Conference 2013
Partnerships and Cross-Sector Approaches

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