Photography_Chapter1_forWikix

Report
Behind the Picture:
Process Makes Perfect
Yearbook content is
arranged using three
common coverage
approaches:
• traditional sections
• chronological presentation
• blended coverage
1.1
Where the
Story Starts:
Generating
Assignments
The best yearbook
photographers are
always thinking about
how every photograph
contributes to the story
being communicated.
1.1
Where the
Story Starts:
Generating
Assignments
A yearbook spread
presents an overall,
broad topic. The best
photos capture a specific
aspect of the topic called
an angle.
1.1
Where the
Story Starts:
Generating
Assignments
An event is often part of
the coverage, but the
event itself is generally
not the topic.
1.1
Where the
Story Starts:
Generating
Assignments
A good photo
assignment doesn’t
dictate:
• picture shapes
• photo content
But, picking out your page layout (page
surfer) at the beginning stages of your
work, can help you know how many
pictures and what types of pictures (how
many horizontal vs. vertical) you need.
This is not to say that you will only take that
many pictures, but it gives you an idea of
what to shoot for. I believe a good rule of
thumb is to figure that only 10% of the
pictures you take will be useable.
1.1
Where the
Story Starts:
Generating
Assignments
The best photos occur
when the photographer
have a variety of lenses
and compositional
techniques:
• close-up and super close-ups
• medium shots
• wide-angle shots
• long shots
1.3
On
Assignment:
Aiming for
the Best
Images for stories in your
yearbook fall into one of
these categories:
• visual narratives
• picture essays
• picture packages
• single images
• collages
• cut outs
• picture collections
• submitted photos
1.4
Making
Choices:
Visual
Editing
An example of a good layout.
1.4
Making
Choices:
Visual
Editing
Dominant
Photo
These visual problems
detract from an
attractive, evocative
yearbook spread:
• shape redundancy
• size redundancy
• busy bleeds
• busy content in small photos
• tonal inconsistencies
• weak cropping
>
MORE
1.4
Making
Choices:
Visual
Editing
>
VISUAL PROBLEMS CONTINUED
• pictures forced into layout
spaces
• best photo isn’t the dominant
• faces looking off the page
• generic pictures
• shooting inanimate objects
1.4
Making
Choices:
Visual
Editing
If the photographer
doesn’t pay attention to
the resolution when
shooting, the photo will
not reproduce well in a
larger size.
Pictures must be 300 dpi or higher in
order for us to be able to use them.
Where we find we have the most
trouble with that these days is when
trying to use photos submitted by
people that have been taken with their
cell phones.
1.5
Technical
Difficulties
How to Right
a Wrong
Cameras have shutter
speed settings that must
be used for flash.
Settings faster than the
recommended setting
will cause the shutter to
open for only a portion of
the exposure.
We have two cameras at our disposal that allow us to adjust the
shutter speed manually. For the most part you will probably even
use these cameras on the “Auto” setting. I do encourage you to
play with these settings from time to time.
1.5
Technical
Difficulties
How to Right
a Wrong
Photographers must
anticipate lighting needs
and take along a flash if
the lighting will be low.
Unfortunately, we do not have an external flash at
this time. You can however anticipate your lighting
needs and take the correct camera for what you will
be photographing.
Using a Digital SLR (D-SLR) camera will get you
better results at a sporting event than a point and
shoot camera. Using a D-SLR will also get you
better results when you are taking pictures under
the lights on the football field. The point and shoot
works great in the outdoors and even in some
indoor situations.
1.5
Technical
Difficulties
How to Right
a Wrong
Photographs shot in
fluorescent light will
need tonal adjustment in
an image-editing
software. A filter on the
front of your lens also
corrects tonality during
the exposure.
We don’t currently have a filter that will
do this, but I may look into purchasing
one as they are rather inexpensive.
1.5
Technical
Difficulties
How to Right
a Wrong
When shooting in low
light or action, make sure
you are using a camera
mode that will offer faster
shutter speeds such as
500, 1000 or higher.
All of our cameras have a “sports”
mode. This is usually a good setting
when taking photos of sporting events.
1.5
Technical
Difficulties
How to Right
a Wrong
Autofocus modes will
help you maintain focus
as long as the
autofocusing mechanism
is placed on the subject.
When manual focusing,
you need to be sure you
are focusing correctly.
1.5
Technical
Difficulties
How to Right
a Wrong
Preventable technical
difficulties can leave you
with no pictures at all:
1.5
Technical
Difficulties
How to Right
a Wrong
After photographing an event,
• incorrect format
always come back to class,
• corrupt images
download your photos, delete
them off the camera, place the
• dead batteries/full
camera battery in the charger
and put the camera away in the
memory card
cupboard.
• shooting over, deleting or
reformatting another
photographer’s pictures
•damaged equipment
Good communication and 1.6
Not-SoTechnical
a commitment to
Difficulties
professionalism can
prevent these problems:
• failed assignments
• time management issues

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