Standards, Assessment, and Curriculum Thursday, July 8, 2004 8:00 am – 1:00 pm Icebreaker • • • • • Get into groups of three One of you represents standards One represents assessment The.

Report
Standards, Assessment,
and Curriculum
Thursday, July 8, 2004
8:00 am – 1:00 pm
Icebreaker
•
•
•
•
•
Get into groups of three
One of you represents standards
One represents assessment
The other represents curriculum
Describe the ideal relationship that
should exist between the three of
you
Standards
• The National Association for the
Education of Young Children (NAEYC)
• Position Statement
• Your school’s standards for the age
group with which you work
My school’s standards
• Alignment with the
NAEYC Position
Statement
• Problems or areas
that need
improvement in
order to better
meet the principles
outlined in the
NAEYC Position
Statement
Assessment
• Write down your own definition of
“assessment” in relation to early
childhood
• Compare your definition with the
NAEYC definition
NAEYC defines
assessment as:
The ongoing process of
• observing
• recording
• documenting
the work children do and how they do it to
provide a basis for a variety of educational
decisions that affect the child
Assessment is integral to
curriculum and instruction
In EC programs, assessment provides a basis
for
1. Planning instruction and communicating
with parents
2. Identifying children with special needs
3. Evaluating programs and demonstrating
accountability
Standards and
Assessment System
• Using either your school’s standards
or another set of standards, fill in
the activity sheet
• Target specific performance
objectives
• Determine what collection method
you will use to collect the recordings
Curriculum
• Continuum…
• How do you define “curriculum” in
early childhood?
NAEYC defines
curriculum as
An organized framework that
delineates
• The content children are to learn
• The processes through which
children achieve the identified
curricular goals
NAEYC definition cont’d
• What teachers do to help children
achieve these goals
• The context in which teaching and
learning occur
Traditional Curriculum
• “Children are consumers of
curriculum.”
Deb Curtis and Marge Carter
Reflecting Children’s Lives
Child-Centered
Curriculum
• “Children are inventors and creators
of curriculum.”
Deb Curtis and Marge Carter
Reflecting Children’s Lives
Negotiated Curriculum
• “The child originates and the teacher
frames.”
Forman & Fyfe (1998)
Authentic Childhood: Exploring Reggio
Emilia in the Classroom
Case Studies
• Read each case study as directed
• Discuss with a partner the questions
at the end
• Share your discussion with the group
The Learning Cycle: The
Quest for Knowledge
• Awareness: recognition that
develops from experience
• Exploration: construction of meaning
through sensory experiences
• Inquiry: comparison of constructions
within context of culture
• Utilization: Understandings can be
applied and used in new situations
Early Literacy
• Confusabet Alphabet
• Four Components of Literacy
Listening
Speaking
Reading
Writing
Teachers should
use songs, chants,
poems, and rhymes
to promote
phonemic awareness
Teachers must monitor
children’s receptive
language
Hearing and listening
are different!
Teachers should
use descriptive
language and
information talk
to increase
children’s
vocabulary
Listening
Adults must model
listening
Listening can
be learned
© Linda Ruhmann, Child Development Department, San Antonio College
Listening is a valuable
academic and
social skill
Speech should
be included in daily
routines
Adults should create a
climate in which
children are comfortable
speaking
In order to learn to
speak well, children
must have many
opportunities to speak
Speaking well is
a valuable
academic and
social skill
Speaking
Using a variety
of questions
encourages speech
Sociodramatic
play encourages
speech
Adults should model
appropriate speech
© Linda Ruhmann, Child Development Department, San Antonio College
Teachers provide
Children with
Individualized
Information on
decoding
Children must perceive
reading as:
Functional
Purposeful
Meaningful
Reading
Teachers must
purposefully expand
children’s
knowledge about
print
Teachers must help children to
become hooked on books
through book-rich environments
and motivating read-alouds
Teachers must use
a variety of strategies
to promote
reading comprehension
© Linda Ruhmann, Child Development Department, San Antonio College
Composition is a
process
Modeling
Encouragement
Support
Social and physical
environment
Materials
Time
Space
Children's stages of
writing are
similar to their
stages of drawing
Writing
Reading and writing
are inter-related
Spelling is a
developmental
process
Requires both physical and
cognitive development
© Linda Ruhmann, Child Development Department, San Antonio College
One-to-One
Correspondence
Number Sense
and
Counting
Logic and Classifying
Measuring
Math Concepts
and Skills
Comparing
Ordering, Seriation
and Patterning
Spatial Sense
Parts and Whole
Shape
Observing
Comparing
Classifying
Hypothesizing and
Controlling Variables:
Investigations
The Basics of Science:
The Processes of Inquiry
Predicting
Measuring
Communicating
Inferring

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