Change and Tension

Report
Tension and Change
[email protected]
[email protected]
Vision Tension
• The core emotional burden of facing the facts
Earth
Systems
Ecosystems and Species
Extinction &toxicity
Climate systems
Disturbance
Atmospheric systems
Ozone depletion, pollution
Oceanic systems
Disturbance to sea levels,
temperatures and currents, sea
life depletion
Geological and Soil systems
Desertification, land pollution,
mineral & resource depletion,
depletion of soil quality, toxicity
Hydrological systems
Water pollution & scarcity
Nutrient systems
Disturbance of nutrient flows,
toxicity
Vision Tension
• The core emotional burden of facing the facts
• The internal tension of having a larger vision
that exists in stark contrast to reality
What is the Unique Leadership Challenge Posed
by The Environmental Imperative?
The global environmental imperative requires us to
change the way in which we do almost everything. The
end goal, environmental sustainability, is a moving
target.
Therefore our organizations must develop a
greater capacity for change and the related
processes of continuous improvement and
organizational transformation.
Philosophically speaking our core shift is to attend to what is between. To
attend to the context in which individual elements interact. To tap the power of
the generative capacity in the relationship between individual elements.
To assume that the individual element is not fixed in its capacity or fully known
in isolation. To embrace the emergent source that exists between individual
elements and between systems.
As a profession we are perhaps being called upon to midwife an awakening of
the power and possibility that lies between all the people and processes that
we have heretofore structured into isolation and fragmentation in the mistaken
pursuit of mastery over.
Perhaps a large part of our destiny is to help ourselves and others to grow back
into the humbling life of ‘relationship with’ in place of ‘mastery over’. There is a
joy in this reunion, some part of us hungers for it – we have this going for us
right from the beginning.
Vision Tension
• The core emotional burden of facing the facts
• The internal tension of having a larger vision
that exists in stark contrast to reality
• The internal tension of framing vision into
components and selling points without losing
the bigger and deeper vision
Market Innovation (Technology, Products & Services)
Conceptual and stylised representation of waves of innovation
Source: TNEP (2005)
Policy and Regulation (State, Local and Institutional)
Climate Action
Greenhouse Gas Emissions Targets (20 states)
Emissions Caps for Electricity (16 states)
Climate Action Plans (36 states)
Active Climate Legislative Commissions and
Executive Branch Advisory Groups (23 states)
Regional Initiatives (32 states)
GHG Reporting and Registries (41 states)
Transportation Sector
Vehicle GHG Emissions Standards (17 states)
Mandates and Incentives Promoting Biofuels (39
states)
VMT-Related Policies and Incentives
Low Carbon Fuel Standard
Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicle Policies
Plug-in Electric Vehicles
Energy Sector
Public Benefit Funds (20 states)
Renewable & Alternative Energy Portfolio
Standards (33 states)
Net Metering Programs (52 states)
Green Pricing Programs (12 states)
Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (21 states)
Financial Incentives for Carbon Capture &
Storage (16 states)
Building Sector
Residential Building Energy Codes (38 states)
Commercial Building Energy Codes (37 states)
Green Building Standards for State Buildings (29
states)
Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE)
Programs….?
Green Jobs (Re-training existing, creating new green jobs)
New and Emerging Green Job
Training
Greater Demand for Existing
Occupations
Re-Training Existing Occupations
State
California
Green Jobs as %
of all Private and
Public Sector
Employment
3.4%
Northern California
8.1%
Oregon (Private only)
3.0%
Michigan
3.0%
Washington State
3.3%
What is our “True North”, the direction in which we can keep
resetting our compass as we travail the disorienting landscape
along the path of change?
Over time we have removed our senses further and further from the natural world.
As we have left our sensual connection to the natural world, as individuals,
communities and society – we have cut ourselves adrift from any feedback as to the
effects of our choices.
We have fallen out of relationship with the natural world and as a result almost
every natural life support system is now in decline.
Our core journey is a journey back into relationship with our living
planet, with each other and with ourselves.
Tensions of Working in Complex
Systems
• The scale of the task ahead, the enormous
complexity of our organizations/communities
and the relative lack of formal power and
resourcing we have
Tensions of Working in Complex
Systems
• The scale of the task ahead, the enormous
complexity of our organizations/communities
and the relative lack of formal power and
resourcing we have
• The emerging identity of our profession, the
expectations of others
Tensions of Working in Complex
Systems
• The scale of the task ahead, the enormous
complexity of our organizations/communities
and the relative lack of formal power and
resourcing we have
• The emerging identity of our profession, the
expectations of others
• Orienting ourselves to a diverse and ever
changing array of personalities, agendas,
power dynamics
Seeing Our Role More Clearly
• There is a degree of ongoing disorientation,
feeling torn, feeling unclear about where the
leverage is and generally feeling overwhelmed
• Can we start developing more mental models
(and continuously improving these) that will
give us a greater conscious grasp of the
landscape up front?
Earth
Systems
Ecosystems and Species
Extinction &toxicity
Climate systems
Disturbance
Atmospheric systems
Ozone depletion, pollution
Oceanic systems
Disturbance to sea levels,
temperatures and currents, sea
life depletion
Geological and Soil systems
Desertification, land pollution,
mineral & resource depletion,
depletion of soil quality, toxicity
Hydrological systems
Water pollution & scarcity
Nutrient systems
Disturbance of nutrient flows,
toxicity
Earth
Systems
Infrastructure
Systems
Ecosystems and Species
Extinction &toxicity
Climate systems
Disturbance
Atmospheric systems
Ozone depletion, pollution
Oceanic systems
Disturbance to sea levels,
temperatures and currents, sea
life depletion
Energy supply &
distribution
Geological and Soil systems
Desertification, land pollution,
mineral & resource depletion,
depletion of soil quality, toxicity
Material supply &
disposal
Hydrological systems
Water pollution & scarcity
Water supply & disposal
Nutrient systems
Disturbance of nutrient flows,
toxicity
Building operations
Food Supply
Building construction
Transportation
Landscaping
Earth
Systems
Infrastructure
Systems
Organizational
Systems
Ecosystems and Species
Extinction &toxicity
Climate systems
Disturbance
Leadership
Culture
Atmospheric systems
Ozone depletion, pollution
Oceanic systems
Disturbance to sea levels,
temperatures and currents, sea
life depletion
Finance & Accounting
Management Structures
Policy Instruments
Geological and Soil systems
Desertification, land pollution,
mineral & resource depletion,
depletion of soil quality, toxicity
Energy supply &
distribution
Procurement systems
Material supply &
disposal
Decision Making
Processes
Food Supply
Hydrological systems
Water pollution & scarcity
Human resources
Water supply & disposal
Planning Processes
Building construction
Regulatory, Market,
& Community Context
Nutrient systems
Disturbance of nutrient flows,
toxicity
Building operations
Transportation
Landscaping
Information Systems
Earth
Systems
Infrastructure
Systems
Organizational
Systems
Ecosystems and Species
Extinction &toxicity
Values
Spirituality/Meaning
Climate systems
Disturbance
Atmospheric systems
Ozone depletion, pollution
Oceanic systems
Disturbance to sea levels,
temperatures and currents, sea
life depletion
Individual
System
Leadership
Family
Culture
Financial Goals
Finance & Accounting
Culture/Community
Management Structures
Social Connections
Policy Instruments
Status
Information Systems
Occupation
Geological and Soil systems
Desertification, land pollution,
mineral & resource depletion,
depletion of soil quality, toxicity
Energy supply &
distribution
Procurement systems
Skills/Abilities
Material supply &
disposal
Decision Making
Processes
Health
Food Supply
Hydrological systems
Water pollution & scarcity
Human resources
Water supply & disposal
Planning Processes
Building construction
Regulatory, Market,
& Community Context
Nutrient systems
Disturbance of nutrient flows,
toxicity
Building operations
Transportation
Landscaping
Earth
Systems
Infrastructure
Systems
Organizational
Systems
Ecosystems and Species
Extinction &toxicity
Values
Spirituality/Meaning
Climate systems
Disturbance
Atmospheric systems
Ozone depletion, pollution
Oceanic systems
Disturbance to sea levels,
temperatures and currents, sea
life depletion
Individual
System
Leadership
Family
Culture
Financial Goals
Finance & Accounting
Culture/Community
Management Structures
Social Connections
Policy Instruments
Status
Information Systems
Occupation
Geological and Soil systems
Desertification, land pollution,
mineral & resource depletion,
depletion of soil quality, toxicity
Energy supply &
distribution
Procurement systems
Skills/Abilities
Material supply &
disposal
Decision Making
Processes
Health
Food Supply
Hydrological systems
Water pollution & scarcity
Human resources
Water supply & disposal
Planning Processes
Building construction
Regulatory, Market,
& Community Context
Nutrient systems
Disturbance of nutrient flows,
toxicity
Building operations
Transportation
Landscaping
Earth
Systems
Infrastructure
Systems
Organizational
Systems
Ecosystems and Species
Extinction &toxicity
Values
Spirituality/Meaning
Climate systems
Disturbance
Atmospheric systems
Ozone depletion, pollution
Oceanic systems
Disturbance to sea levels,
temperatures and currents, sea
life depletion
Individual
System
Leadership
Family
Culture
Financial Goals
Finance & Accounting
Culture/Community
Management Structures
Social Connections
Policy Instruments
Status
Information Systems
Occupation
Geological and Soil systems
Desertification, land pollution,
mineral & resource depletion,
depletion of soil quality, toxicity
Energy supply &
distribution
Procurement systems
Skills/Abilities
Material supply &
disposal
Decision Making
Processes
Health
Food Supply
Hydrological systems
Water pollution & scarcity
Human resources
Water supply & disposal
Planning Processes
Nutrient systems
Disturbance of nutrient flows,
toxicity
Building construction
Building operations
Transportation
Landscaping
Regulatory, Market,
& Community ContextA
lot of tension
emerges from the
interdependence of
these spheres
We Need to Make Change Easier: We Need to
Know How our Organizations Really Work
Our organizations are limited in their capacity for rationality
but they do still have patterns, rules and incentives that can
be understood.
O rg an izatio n s are sev erely lim ited in th eir cap acity to
b eh av e ration ally d u e to inh eren t ch aracteristics su ch as:
• co m p lex ity,
• lim ited cap acities to calcu late all p aram eters,
• th e tend en cy to w ard s ‘satisfycin g ’,
• frag m en tatio n o f p roblem an d so lution elem en ts,
• lim ited o rg an izatio n al rep erto ires,
• sh ifting co alitio n s,
• sh o rtag es o f tim e an d atten tion ,
• q u asi reso lution s to co n flict and
• u n certain ty av o id an ce.
(S im o n an d M arch 1 98 6 )
S aid another w ay, institutions like universities are
generally ‘plagued w ith goal am biguity an d conflict,
w ith poorly understood problem s that w ander in and out
of the system , w ith a variable environ m ent and decision m akers w ith other things on their m inds ’.
M ich a el D . C o h en and J am es G . M a rch . L ea d ersh ip and A m b ig u ity – T h e A m erica n C o lleg e P resid en t.
2 nd E d itio n. H a rva rd B u sin ess S ch oo l P ress.
We Need to Make Change Easier: Like our
own minds our organizations are largely
unconscious. They will are revealed to us
largely through the change process.
5% of what the individual does is
consciously processed
In large organizations most daily
operations have become a habit,
no longer done with awareness,
no longer examined for the true
costs/benefit.
This is why READY, FIRE, AIM can
be the right sequence in the early
stages of catalyzing change.
Tensions of Discovering How our Organizations
Really Work
• Dealing with the Image of Rationality, Hierarchy and
Linear Decision-Making and the reality of how our
organizations actually work
• Recovering from the blame that is coming your way.
• Walking the line between being honest, transparent
and principled – and doing what you need to do to
get progress and break through hierarchical gridlock
(or other institutional barriers).
The Great Challenge for ahead will be Navigating
Interdependence in a Fragmented Organization &
Society
Interdependence between:









Professional, departments, groups & organizations
Capital, Finance & Accounting
Leadership
Technology, products & Services
Information
Capacity Building/Education
Values and Culture
Policy
and more….
Interdependence Case Study: Changing Light bulbs at Harvard
Simple Light Bulb Changing Project at Harvard University
Full Process = 3 months of constant facilitation by change managers
Barriers: Time + Capital + Policy + Training/Education + Values + Service/product
School
4
Green
Campus
Loan Fund
20
19
8
1
2
7
My staff
6
14
Vendor
Sales Rep
Technician
Finance Mgr (capital budget) 18
Finance Mgr (operating budget)
17
3
9
10
House Master
15
12
Univ. Ops
16
Facility Director 5
Building Manager (Superintendent)
13
Maintenance
crew
11
House occupants (students)
REP coordinator (student)
Interdependence Case Study: Green Buildings at Harvard
Pilot Projects & Expand
Change Attitudes
Address Finance & Accounting Issues
Engage & Develop Capacities
Streamlining and Reforming processes
Engage Executive Leaders to Formalize Commitment
2001
2002
2003
3
3
2004
4
4
2005
5
5
2006
12
12
2007
16
16
23
2008
2009
23
2011
50+
50+
Rate of Growth re: Number of Green Building Projects on Harvard Campus
Extensive Change Management Process Used to Foster Organizational Conditions
Necessary for Wide Scale Engagement, Innovation, Learning,
Leadership and Commitment
80+
Letting go of Control and Taking up the Role of Midwife
28
We Need to Make Change Easier
Most people believe that humans are innately averse to change. This is not
true.
A more accurate assessment is that people have an aversion to instability and
risk and they assume that change equals instability and risk.
People are actually invigorated by change when it occurs with adequate
stability and low risk.
The most common source of unanticipated instability/risk is the failure to
address interdependence. In other words ignoring the system and focusing
only on certain parts.
Group Intelligence Will Matter More in the Green Economy
Than Individual Intelligence
“When it comes to intelligence, the whole can indeed be greater
than the sum of its parts. A new study co-authored by MIT,
Carnegie Mellon University, and Union College researchers
documents the existence of collective intelligence among groups
of people who cooperate well, showing that such intelligence
extends beyond the cognitive abilities of the groups’ individual
members….
They discovered that groups featuring the right kind of internal
dynamics perform well on a wide range of assignments, a finding
with potential applications for businesses & other organizations.”
http://web.mit.edu/press/2010/collective-intel.html
Change Management Progression for Organizations
Awakening
Pioneering
Transformation
Produced by Leith Sharp in collaboration with Julie Newman
Awakening
Defining
Awakening
Awakening phase puts
sustainability on the agenda for
the organization.
Produced by Leith Sharp in collaboration with Julie Newman
Awakening
a
=
wAttributes of
a
k
e •This stage is about campus sustainability being moved onto the
n organization’s agenda but with a low level of understanding as to
i
what it actually means or requires from the institution
n
g
=
There are a small number of early champions pushing forward
often in a voluntary capacity (not part of their real job)
•
Some little victories help to break through the initial inertia with
some early project and program successes and the numbers of
people vocalizing support grows
•
It might eventually produce enough commitment to fund a
sustainability professional to help organize and coordinate
efforts
•
Produced by Leith Sharp in collaboration with Julie Newman
Awakening
a
=
wTransitioning
a
k
e
n
The organization is ready to move into the PIONEERING phase
i
n when a threshold of top level commitment, dedicated
g sustainability staff and engaged champions has been reached
=
Produced by Leith Sharp in collaboration with Julie Newman
Pioneering
a
w
a
k
e
n
i
n
g
Defining Pioneering
The Pioneering phase is when the institution is
experiencing an acceleration of pilot projects and new
initiatives . The institution is now working at the
frontier, exploring how much change it can institute
and how quickly. The work involves integrating
sustainability into the small and large arena’s of
organizational life. It is largely about improving
procedures within the existing organizational
framework.
Produced by Leith Sharp in collaboration with Julie Newman
attributes of Pioneering
a
w
•Proliferation
of projects and programs across the campus
a
k
•Significant
expansion of active engagement across the campus
e
n
•Development
of new capacities, attitudinal shifts and confidence.
i
•The
above three factors makes it possible to drive new formal commitments,
n
g
goals,
policies and standards which in turn accelerate engagement across the
institution
•The sustainability staff are spending more time coordinating and supporting
the leadership of others than advocating and cajoling.
•The sustainability related governance structure of the institution is further
developed to formalize leadership and engagement in sustainability decisionmaking
•The organization is able to integrate a variety of new practices and
procedures into existing organizational systems and structures. There is no
real shift in power nor is there any process reform.
Produced by Leith Sharp in collaboration with Julie Newman
Pioneering
a Transitioning
w
a
k
e At a certain point the organization begins to reach a plateau
n whereby the capacity of the existing organizational systems and
i structures to integrate new practices is tapped out. Pressing for
n
g additional progress begins to reveal deeper institutional limitations,
barriers and resistance.
At this stage we must positioning the organization to move into the
TRANSFORMATION phase – by gaining enough formal power,
leveraging leadership, fostering understanding of necessity for
reform, building capacities to support the reform.
Produced by Leith Sharp in collaboration with Julie Newman
a
wDefining
=
a
k
e institution is in the Transformation stage of the cycle when sustainability
An
n
has
i become a central organizing principle that is leading to deep
n
organizational
reforms.
g
=
Transformation
The Pioneering stage was focused on integrating sustainability into the existing
power structures, decision making processes and organizational systems.
Transformation involves reforming these structures, processes and systems in
order to better enable sustainability to be achieved.
Produced by Leith Sharp in collaboration with Julie Newman
attributes of Transformation
Organizational
Systems
Attributes of an Organization in Transformation
Leadership
Deep & visible sustainability commitment, values/preserves trust,
drives collaboration as well as individual performance, leverages
influence & authority from bottom-up, horizontal, top-down
Governance
Distributed ownership and engagement, drives continuous
improvement, enables systemic reform
Management Structures Cross-departmental permeability, interdisciplinary collaboration,
bottom-up and horizontal interactivity
Finance and Accounting
Financial drivers for innovation and systems efficiency, rewards
performance, drives collaboration
Capacity Building
Empowered workforce that is engaged in life long learning, broad
engagement in implementation cycles for continuous testing and
learning
Knowledge
Effective prioritization, gathering and dissemination of knowledge
Sustainability Viewed as Change management team embedded with senior report and
Requiring a Change
organization-wide connectivity with the capacity to undertake all
Management Function
core change management functions for sustainability Produced by Leith Sharp
Green Building Design – Nathan Gauthier – 4.9.08
Owner
Designer
www.aangepastbouwen.nl
Contractor
Supplier
Traditional
Design
Process
www.hansa-klima.de
Understand the Team
Designer
Green Building Design – Nathan Gauthier – 4.9.08
Owner
Project
Team
Supplier
Integrated
Contractor
Design
Integrated Design Requires
Process Understand
Team
an Integratedthe
Team
What standard will we answer to as a new profession?
Is it enough to justify the existence of our profession?
Is it enough to get our institutions into the latest top ‘green’ ratings?
Is it enough to look good on our websites and to our students and alumni?
Just these battles are hard won, exhausting and humbling. To look beyond
the relative comfort and rewards of these achievements will take
something deep from within enough of us.
There may be just a window of time in which we build this depth into the
foundation of our professional identity. We should ask ourselves these
questions alone and together in the coming months/years.
Earth
Systems
Infrastructure
Systems
Organizational
Systems
Ecosystems and Species
Extinction &toxicity
Values
Spirituality/Meaning
Climate systems
Disturbance
Atmospheric systems
Ozone depletion, pollution
Oceanic systems
Disturbance to sea levels,
temperatures and currents, sea
life depletion
Individual
System
Leadership
Family
Culture
Financial Goals
Finance & Accounting
Culture/Community
Management Structures
Social Connections
Policy Instruments
Status
Information Systems
Occupation
Geological and Soil systems
Desertification, land pollution,
mineral & resource depletion,
depletion of soil quality, toxicity
Energy supply &
distribution
Procurement systems
Skills/Abilities
Material supply &
disposal
Decision Making
Processes
Health
Food Supply
Hydrological systems
Water pollution & scarcity
Human resources
Water supply & disposal
Planning Processes
Building construction
Regulatory, Market,
& Community Context
Nutrient systems
Disturbance of nutrient flows,
toxicity
Building operations
Transportation
Landscaping
Examples of how the 3
systems are
interdependent?
Earth
Systems
Infrastructure
Systems
Organizational
Systems
Individual
System
Ecosystems and Species
Extinction &toxicity
Relationships
Climate systems
Disturbance
Atmospheric systems
Ozone depletion, pollution
Oceanic systems
Disturbance to sea levels,
temperatures and currents, sea
life depletion
Geological and Soil systems
Desertification, land pollution,
mineral & resource depletion,
depletion of soil quality, toxicity
Hydrological systems
Water pollution & scarcity
Nutrient systems
Disturbance of nutrient flows,
toxicity
Provide information,
examples and support
pilots of new
technologies, practices
and products
Work to gain leadership
Goals/Commitments
Empathic connection
Sustainability Plan
Trust
Sustainability staff
Recognition
Training existing staff
Peer to peer modeling
Social marketing and
behavior change
Ownership and shared
determination
Inclusion
Leverage peer to peer
influence to prove
viability
What are we
already doing in
these 3 system
spheres?
Earth
Systems
Infrastructure
Systems
Organizational
Systems
Individual
System
Ecosystems and Species
Climate systems
Atmospheric systems
Oceanic systems
Geological and Soil systems
Hydrological systems
Nutrient systems
What traits might emerge at a
university/college in a
sustainable relationship with
our living planet?
Challenging conventional approaches to air change rates in
laboratories
Weld Hill Research Center
Seeking LEED Gold
Closed loop geothermal system for heating and cooling, ventilation rates for lab space
designed to 6 air changes per hour with night time set-back
Department: Arnold Arboretum
Building Type: Labs and Offices
Size: 45,000 square feet
Integration Design and Systems Thinking Can
Help Us Solve the Big Problems
Building Name
Leverett Towers F & G
Department
Faculty of Arts and Sciences
Description
Complex of 2 11-story towers
Age
Built 1959; renovations every 4 years
Size
121,697 square feet
Occupancy
158 suites, 20 tutor apartments; 300 residents
Demographics
Undergraduates, graduate tutors
Lease format
Academic year appointments; temporary summer housing
Building systems and
utilities
Heat/ventilation: Steam to forced air and radiant heat;
Hot water: steam
Air conditioning: window units
Electricity: tutor kitchenette appliances
Natural gas: dryers (1990-2001 only)
2006 GHG emissions
1537 MTCDE
Integration Design and Systems Thinking Can
Help Us Solve the Big Problems
Cost Neutral Climate Neutral Building Case Study
Leverett Towers Investment Summary
Component
Energy Conservation Measures
% of
Energy
Portfolio
Investment Period
MTCDE/yr
17%
2007-2009
255
3%
2007-2009
49
Fuel Switch
22%
2012-2020
345
Offsets
58%
2012-2020
888
((2%))
2007-2020
((33))
Renewable Energy Technology (onsite)
Behavior Program
Business Modeling for Cost Neutral Climate
Neutrality
Cost Neutral Climate Neutral Building Case Study
(Research provided by 2008 thesis student Debra Shepard)
Leverette Towers Financial Summary for Climate Neutrality
Net present value
through 2020
Financial Category
Investments (Energy Conservation Measures, Onsite Renewable Energy,
Fuel Switching, Behavior change)
Savings (Energy Conservation Measures, Fuel Switching, Behavior change)
Carbon Offset Purchases
($1,068,958)
$1,142,947
($68,268)
TOTAL PROGRAM Net Present Value (12yr timeframe)
Leverett Tow ers:
Climate Neutral Portfolio at 2020
17%
3%
ECMs
RETs
Fuel Sw itch
58%
22%
Offsets
51
$5,721
Capital Budget
Managers
Utility Budget
Managers
Maintenance Budget
Managers
Barrier: Accounting
structures are driving
inefficient design and
operations by limiting
the appropriate
movement of
investments and
savings
Human Resources
Managers
Harvard’s Green Campus Initiative 2000 Onwards
Green Campus Loan Fund
Green Campus Loan Fund:
$12 million interest-free capital for conservation projects
Existing Buildings
New Construction
Full capital cost covered
Cost delta funded
5 year payback maximum
10 year payback maximum
Simple payback used
Lifecycle costing used
$14.5+ million lent since 2001
180+ projects
27+% average return on investment
Common Practices:
1.
Capital Budget
Managers
Utility Budget
Managers
No capital budget consideration of
operating costs implications and
opportunities
2.
No efficiency funding in annual
maintenance/operating budgets
3.
No way to return savings to the
people that achieve them
4.
Reduced annual operating budgets
when energy costs reduced
5.
No funding for piloting and testing
new practices
Maintenance Budget
Managers
Human Resources
Managers
Transformation is about context
A finance and accounting context that would energize green
economic growth…..
Provide champions with timely access to funds for good paybacks
Allow for savings to be captured and reinvested
Share savings with the people making it possible
Provide seed funds for pilot projects
Consider the costs over the life of the project not just first cost
Savings exist within whole systems not just the parts
Produced by Leith Sharp
Transformation is about context
An organizational context to empower the full potential of
people as change agents…………
Stable experiences
of innovation and success
Context of institutional commitment and management support
Peer to peer interactions
Rewards, incentives and recognition
Removal of barriers and disincentives
Proper inclusion in decision-making processes
Ongoing training and opportunities to learn
Access to expertise
I am fully engaged in working
on my part of the solution in
every way possible!
Produced by Leith Sharp
Earth
Systems
Infrastructure
Systems
Organizational Systems
Individual System
Scienctific,
technical
knowledge
Picking the right focus
Finding early champions, and
determining who to focus your
relationship building on (and who to
leave until later)
Active listening skills
Engaging them in processes like
AI and other democratizing
processes to gather input
Sales and communications
Learning a inventory of techniques for
getting the middle majority to give
attention and become
engaged/empowered
Research – market innovations
Creating some early victories,
Benchmarking
Getting symbolic leadership signal of
support and evolving that to fully
engaged executive leadership
Setting goals
Cost benefit analysis
Experimentation/piloting
Project management
Peer to peer
core relationship building
(building trust and mutual
understanding, conflict
mediation, having difficult
conversations)
Learn about the cultures (student,
admin, faculty, other sub groupings)
Identify the influential people and build
alliances.
Knowing your policy and regulatory
environment and leveraging this to your
advantage
Campus sustainability planning process
Social marketing and behavior change
programs
Social technologies
Establishing mutual
empathetic connections
How to maintain respect in
the face of difference,
resistance
Understanding personalities
Authentic presence
Sustaining good will, trust
Appreciation and
acknowledgement
Acknowledging our own
biases/traits/strengths and
weaknesses
Earth
Systems
Infrastructure Systems
Organizational Systems
Individual
System
Scientific,
technical
knowledge
Understanding what their job is
Great meeting planning/
management/facilitation
Knowing thyself,
manage thyself and
continuously learn!
And acknowledge what they have
done already and defusing
Social technology for engagement
tendency of feeling that we are Organization development & learning theory Defining some of the
trying to tell them how to do
abstract words (what
Understanding org charts, informal power,
their job
is leadership?)
who the listens to who, where are the
Tracking, metric, evaluation
alliances – learning to conduct the voices
Celebrating, giving credit
Learn about successful programs/a
Elevating, giving a platform
Getting a seat at the table
Leverage points and
organizational analysis, systems
analysis, relationship and power
mapping
vocabulary of successful programs and
projects: eco rep programs, green office
programs, green building programs, green
cleaning program
Learning how to manage student
volunteers, staff etc
Leveraging student power/minimizing
student risk
Leveraging faculty power and minimizing
faculty risk
Learning from existing leadership
development resources/programs
Understand the emerging executive
leadership roles/demands/needs
Modes for Professional Development (how can we access this)
Modes
Better promotion existing courses/resources (Harvard extension school – shorten if possible)
Regional sustainability professional development workshops
Formal mentorship and/or buddy system programs/systems
Intensive workshops for targeted dilemmas (small groups, intensive, long)
Webinars – practitioners sharing best practices, perhaps organized by institutional types, different
regions
Core insights, frameworks
Practice learning opportunities
Visiting scholars program – we go for a term to work on other campuses
Engaging other experts from other professional arenas/tiers to help train us
Characteristics:
2-3 hours/wk – up to 10 weeks
$500ish
Travel – keep to minimum
Understanding that face to face is a foundation for online/virtual
County/regional wide – build regional networks/relationships. Campus based 1-1.5 days
We need to develop an easy way to host regional meetings – recipe/resource/expertise (could use
dilemmas from host institution)

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