Alabama School Readiness Alliance

Report
Alabama School
Readiness Alliance
Seeking voluntary, high-quality pre-k programs
for all of Alabama’s four-year-olds
 Fall 2005—the membership of Alabama Giving
voted to collectively advocate and fund one
issue in Alabama—
School Readiness.
Who is ASRA?
ASRA
believes:
 School Readiness =

enthusiasm for learning

the ability to function in a social
setting
age appropriate physical and
emotional skills


optimal health
ASRA and OSR knowChildren Who Participate in High-Quality Pre-K:
 Demonstrate higher academic achievement
 Are less likely to participate in criminal activity during their juvenile




or adult years
Are less likely to repeat a grade
Are less likely to require special
education classes
Are more likely to graduate from
high school
Are more likely to enroll in college
Committee for Economic Development (2006). The economic promise of investing in high-quality preschool: Using early education to improve
economic growth and the fiscal sustainability of states and the nation. Washington, D.C.
ASRA and OSR knowChildren Who Participate in High-Quality Pre-K:
 Are more likely to have higher earnings than similar students who
do not participate in pre-k
 Are less likely to be victims of child
maltreatment or neglect
 Are less likely to be unemployed as adults
 Are less likely to depend on public assistance,
become teenage parents, or endanger their
health by smoking
Committee for Economic Development (2006). The economic promise of investing in high-quality preschool: Using early education to improve
economic growth and the fiscal sustainability of states and the nation. Washington, D.C.
Guiding Principles for
Expanding Pre-K:
 A voluntary program for those who choose it
 Focus on closing achievement gaps
 Research-based curricula
 Ongoing assessment of children’s
health, development, and learning
 Supports for parental and family
involvement
 Build upon existing pre-k, child care,
and Head Start programs
Guiding Principles
for Expanding Pre-K:
 Delivery in a variety of settings
 Funding for community-based
programs as well as schools
 Assurance that new dollars do not
displace current funding
 Funding level necessary to achieve
quality (including infrastructure)
 Accountability
Kindergarten
Teacher Survey
Virtually 100% who responded
agreed with the statement :
“Ensuring that all Alabama children
have access to quality preschool
programs is an important
investment in improving the overall
quality of education that children
receive.”
Kindergarten
Teacher Survey
 86% consider it “very important” for
children to spend time in a preschool
program before they start kindergarten.
 82% responded that “all children would
benefit” from spending time in a quality
preschool program.
 Reported fewer behavioral problems
Kindergarten
Teacher Survey

Nearly 90% reported that students who
participated in high-quality pre-k had greater:






Ability to share and play with other
children
Ability to follow instructions
Ability to pay attention
Color and shape recognition
Counting and early math skills
Early literacy skills
Voter Poll
 The Tarrance Group and
Peter D. Hart Research Associates
 Support for pre-k among Alabama
voters is 76%
 ALABAMA citizens…



understand that pre-k gives children a definite advantage,
believe the state is doing too little in this arena,
and think the time to act is now.
First in Quality,
Last in Access
 National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER)
ranked Alabama’s state-funded pre-k program first in the nation
in quality.
 NIEER ranked Alabama last in access.
 Less than four percent
of Alabama’s four-year-olds are
currently served by state-funded pre-k.
Legislative Funding
Increase
 Alabama Legislature passed a record-breaking
Education Trust Fund budget in Spring 2007.
 Annual budget of the Office of School
Readiness:
$4.6 million
$10 million
Coalition Building

ASRA members include over 200 individuals and
organizations








AARP
Business Council of Alabama
Rotary
Alabama Faith Council
Children’s Policy Councils
Head Start
child care centers
K-12 schools
Advocacy Areas for
2008
1.
2.
Legislative advocacy
Communications/Awareness-Raising



3.
Community leaders
Parents
Potential pre-k providers
Support the Office of School Readiness
State-Funded Pre-K
At A Glance
Annual Budget
# of Pre-K Sites
# Children Served
$ 10,000,000.00
129
2,263
Types of Programs
Public Schools
Private Child Care Centers
Head Start Centers
Colleges or University
Public Housing
Faith Based
55
44
21
03
01
05
(43%)
(34%)
(16%)
(2%)
(1%)
(4%)
# of Accredited Programs
Accredited
In Process
47
07
(36%)
(5%)
# Children w/Special Needs
# ESL Children
# Low Income Children/Families
149 (7%)
69
(3%)
1,379 (61%)
FIRST CLASS:
Alabama’s Voluntary
Pre-K Initiative
COUNCIL MEMBERS
Mark E. Dixon, Chair
Education Policy Advisor
Office of Governor Bob Riley
Richard H. Dorrough, Co-Chair
Commissioner
Alabama Department of Children's Affairs
Dr. Marquita Davis
Director
JCCEO Head Start & Early Head Start
Mary Sibert Davis
Executive Director
Childcare Resource Network
Carol Gordy
Chairman
Business Council of Alabama
Anita Humphrey
President
Alabama Head Start Association
Sue McInnish
President
Alabama Giving
Carol Novak
President
A+ Education Foundation
Gail Piggott
Executive Director
Alabama Partnership for children
Karen Porter
Alabama Reading Initiative Specialist
Alabama Department of Education
Jeana Ross
Community Education Director
Boaz City School System
Linda Tilly
Executive Director
VOICES for Alabama’s Children
The Council is grateful for the invaluable work and strong support of
Chris McInnish
Deputy Commissioner
Alabama Department of Children’s Affairs
Dr. Trellis Smith
Director
Office of School Readiness
Dr. Carolyn Cobb, Consultant
FIRST CLASS–
Executive Summary
BUILDING ON A FOUNDATION
Existing preschool infrastructure
Expand number served
FLEXIBLE AND AFFORDABLE
Meet needs of individual classrooms
Provide extra state funds based on family income
HIGH STANDARDS AND
STRONG TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
Assistance in reaching Quality
Professional Development
SOUND INVESTMENT
Stretches available state funds in strategic way
First Class Funding
Strategy
Federal
Funds
Community
Based
Funds
Other
+
Existing
Funding
=
State
Supported
Slots
Pre-K
Excellence
Grant
HighQuality
Pre-K
+
Other
Parent-Fee
Structure
Pre-K Excellence
Grants
$45,000
OSR competitive grant process
State-Supported Slots
Monthly Parent Fee Sliding Scale
Percent of Poverty Level
Payment
Component
0%-100%
101%-200% 201%-300%
301%-400%
> 400%
Parent Portion
$40.00
$40.00
$100.00
$200.00
$300.00
State Portion
$260.00
$260.00
$200.00
$100.00
$0
Total Per Child
$300.00
$300.00
$300.00
$300.00
$300.00
Income Range
For Family of 4
Up to
$20,000
$20,001$40,000
$40,001$60,000
$60,001$80,000
Above
$80,000
Classroom Budget
Scenario
Possible Scenario 1
Public school, private child care, or additional pre-k class in a Head Start
Center serving largely low to low-middle income children.
Number of
Children
Total Parent Fees
(all slots)
Pre-K Excellence Grant
State
Funds
$45,000
Non-State Supported Slots
0
$0
$0
State Supported (Low Income)
15
$5,400
$35,100
State Supported (Low Middle)
3
$2,700
$5,400
State Supported (Middle)
0
$0
$0
Totals
18
$8,100
$85,500
Total Budget
$93,600
Classroom Budget
Scenario
Possible Scenario 2
Public school, private child care, or additional pre-k class in a Head Start
Center serving children from various income levels.
Number of
Children
Total Parent Fees
(all slots)
Pre-K Excellence Grant
State
Funds
$45,000
Non-State Supported Slots
5
$13,500
$0
State Supported (Low Income)
0
$0
$0
State Supported (Low Middle)
4
$3,600
$7,200
State Supported (Middle)
9
$16,200
$8,100
Totals
18
$33,300
$60,300
Total Budget
$93,600
Classroom Budget
Scenario
Possible Scenario 3
Public school, private child care, or additional pre-k class in a Head Start
Center serving low-income children.
Number of
Children
Total Parent Fees
(all slots)
Pre-K Excellence Grant
State
Funds
$45,000
Non-State Supported Slots
0
$0
$0
State Supported (Low Income)
18
$6,480
$42,120
State Supported (Low Middle)
0
$0
$0
State Supported (Middle)
0
$0
$0
Totals
18
$6,480
$87,120
Total Budget
$93,600
Classroom Budget
Scenario
Possible Scenario 4
Public school, private child care, or additional pre-k class in a Head Start
Center serving upper-income children.
Number of
Children
Total Parent Fees
(all slots)
Pre-K Excellence Grant
State
Funds
$45,000
Non-State Supported Slots
18
$48,600
$0
State Supported (Low Income)
0
$0
$0
State Supported (Low Middle)
0
$0
$0
State Supported (Middle)
0
$0
$0
Totals
18
$48,600
$45,000
Total Budget
$93,600
First Class: Alabama’s
Voluntary Pre-K Program
•EVALUATION
•MONITORING
•PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
•TEACH Early Childhood
Alabama
Plans to Grow and
Grow…
2008
2009
2010
2011
High Quality Classrooms
131
400
800
1,105
State Supported Slots
1,512
3,040
6,080
8,398
Federal or Local Funded Slots
846
4,560
9,120
12,597
Total Children Served
2,258
7,600
15,200
20,995
Pre-K Excellence Grants
$18,000,000
$36,000,000
$49,725,000
State Supported Slots
$4,614,500
$11,217,600
$15,494,310
Total Grant Budget
$22,612,500
$47,217,600
$65,219,310
Program Monitors
4
20
40
55
Technical Assistants
5
27
53
74
Program Monitor Salary and Benefits
$220,000
$1,100,000
$2,200,000
$3,038,750
Technical Assistant Salary and Benefits
$375,000
$2,000,000
$4,000,000
$5,525,000
Administration
$448,759
$1,275,000
$2,050,000
$2,640,938
Travel
$120,000
$400,000
$800,000
$1,105,000
TEACH and Start Up Grants
$2,500,000
$2,500,000
$3,000,000
Evaluation
$287,024
$350,000
$350,000
$30,174,524
$59,117,600
$80,878,998
First Class Total Budget
$10,000,000
Alabama High-Quality
Pre-K Standards
1. Programs shall operate at least 180 days each year and at
least 6.5 hours a day.
2. Each classroom shall meet DHR Child Care Standards.
3. Each classroom shall have no more than 18 students with a
9:1 student to staff ratio.
4. Each classroom shall have a lead teacher with at least a B.A. or
B.S. in Childhood Development or Early Childhood Education.
Auxiliary teachers shall have a CDA.
5. Each program shall have signed parental contracts with the
legal guardian of each child and shall demonstrate parent or
guardian participation for at least 6 hours each year.
6. Each program shall utilize curricula approved by the Office of
School Readiness.
Alabama High-Quality
Pre-K Standards
7. Each child shall be assessed based on OSR assessment
requirements.
8. Each teacher shall have at least 40 hours per year of OSR
approved Pre-K professional development.
9. Each child shall receive health screenings including physical
health, developmental delay, vision, hearing, and dental before
the 10th week of school.
10. Each classroom shall have an appropriate environment as
indicated by a set score on the OSR approved program
assessment.
Procedure: In order for programs to be certified as meeting
these standards, they must allow OSR monitors and technical
assistants to conduct standard assessments, review
documentation, and observe each classroom.
Want more
information?
More information and additional resources on
ASRA available online:
www.alavoices.org/ASRA.aspx
www.dca.state.al.us/osr

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