Apostrophe flow chart

Report
Apostrophe flow
chart
December 2013. Kindly contributed by Richard Scott, Warwickshire Adult and
Community Learning. Search for Richard on www.skillsworkshop.org
This resource is accompanied by a matching PDF file. To find related links and
resources, please visit the download page for this resource at
skillsworkshop.org .
Underpins the following Functional English coverage & range statement.
Level 2
•
Punctuate written text using commas, apostrophes and inverted commas accurately
http://www.ofqual.gov.uk/
and the following Adult Literacy curriculum elements
Rs/L1.2 Use punctuation to help their understanding
(a) understand the function of the omissive apostrophe to indicate an contracted word form in
texts written in an informal style
(b) understand the use of the possessive apostrophe to show ownership or close link
Ws/L2.4 Punctuate sentences correctly, and use punctuation correctly (e.g. commas,
apostrophes, inverted commas)
(b) understand the use of the apostrophe to show a missing letter(s) (e.g. they're, we've, I'm)
(c) know the full verb equivalents and that the writer can choose short or full forms depending on
the formality required
(d) understand the difference between it's (it is) and its (belonging to it)
(e) understand the use of the apostrophe to show where a final -s indicates that something
belongs to someone/thing.
http://www.excellencegateway.org.uk/sflcurriculum
Apostrophes (’)
START
How many
are there?
one
Do they
own
anything?
no
Do nothing
m
a
n
y
Do they
own
anything?
y
e
s
Add an s
AND an
apostrophe
(‘) after the s
(e.g. s’
no
Just add s
OR follow
the plural
rule (e.g. add
–ies,
-es, etc)
Add an
apostrophe
(‘) before the
s (e.g. ‘s)
Apostrophes have 2 uses:
1/ to show possession e.g. “The dog’s bowl.”
2/ to show letters are missing e.g. in “didn’t” the o
is missing and has been replaced by an apostrophe
(omission)
!!!WARNING!!!
its and it’s do not follow the above rules.
its is the possessive
it’s is the omissive
So, for these, think is it “it is”. If so, use “it’s” (with the apostrophe).
If not, use “its” (no apostrophe)
Created by Richard Scott from Warwickshire Adult and Community Learning

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