P2 - Providing Context for RDA

Report
Providing Context for RDA
Derived from IFLA documents and various presentations delivered by
RDA Joint Steering Committee members at IFLA, ALA or CLA conferences
Compiled by:
Modified by:
Sue Andrews
University of British Columbia Library
[email protected]
Les Moor
University of Manitoba Libraries
[email protected]
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Objectives of this module
• Identify major developments in cataloguing that have
influenced RDA
• Introduce the Functional Requirements for
Bibliographic Records
• Understand the origins of the organization and
terminology of RDA
• Understand RDA’s role in an international cataloguing
context
RDA Influences
• Major events and studies influencing RDA
– Paris Principles (1961)
– AACR (1967); AACR2 (1978)
– Stockholm Seminar (1990)
– FRBR (1998)
– FRAD (2004)
– IME/ICC (2009)
• RDA (2010)
Paris Principles (1961)
• Originated from “The International
Conference on Cataloguing Principles” – Paris,
1961
• Influenced by > 100 years of previous codes
and principles
• Highly influential
AACR (1967)
AACR2 (1978)
• Originated from “The International
Conference on Cataloguing Principles” – Paris,
1961
• Influenced by > 100 years of previous codes
and principles
• Highly influential
Stockholm Seminar on Cataloguing
(1990)
• IFLA-sponsored seminar with participants from around the world
• Agreement on the need for a re-examination of existing
international cataloguing practices
• Proposed an IFLA-sponsored study to:
• Examine the relationships between the data elements in
bibliographic records and the user needs to be met.
• Recommend an internationally acceptable basic level of
functionality and a set of basic data requirements for records
created by national bibliographic agencies.
•
i.e. what do we really need in our records?
The findings were reported in the (1998) IFLA publication:
Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records
Functional Requirements for Bibliographic
Records (FRBR) (1998)
• A user-based approach
• No a priori assumptions
• An entity analysis technique
– entities
– attributes
– relationships
• Consideration of all users, all formats
• Independence from any particular cataloguing code
FRBR: Generic User Tasks
• To find (e.g. materials on a given topic, by a given author).
• To identify (e.g. confirm that the record retrieved
corresponds to the document or format sought, and to
distinguish between two resources with the same title)
• To select (e.g. have enough information to decide which of
multiple records best suits the user’s needs)
• To obtain (e.g. have enough info to find on shelf, order, access
electronically, the resource you’ve discovered)
FRBR Entities
1
Works
Expressions
Manifestations
Items
2
Persons
Families
Corporate
bodies
3
Concepts
Objects
Events
Places
Relationships between Group 1 Entities
The Movie
The Novel
Work:
Expression: Orig.
Text
Transl.
Critical
Edition
Manifestation:
Paper
Item:
Copy 1
Autographed
PDF
Copy 2
HTML
Orig.
Version
FRBR Relationships
• Persons, events, other works
– are the subjects of Works
• Authors, artists, composers
– create Works
• Editors, translators
– realize Expressions
• Publishers, printers
– publish or print Manifestations
• Donors, libraries
– own Items
FRBR in MARC
Work - red
Expression - blue
Manifestation - green
Item - orange
Functional Requirements for Authority
Data (FRAD) (2009)
What are the functions of Authority Data?
– To Document decisions
– To Serve as reference tool
– To Control forms of access points
– To Support access to the bibliographic file
– To Link bibliographic and authority files
FRAD User Tasks and Entities
User tasks:
– Find (e.g. information on an entity and its associated resources)
– Identify (e.g. confirm that the entity described corresponds to
the entity sought)
– Contextualize (rda: clarify) (e.g. clarify the relationship between
two or more entities)
– Justify (rda: understand) (e.g. understand why a particular name
or title is chosen as the “preferred” name or title)
• Entities:
– FRBR Group 1 (work, expression, manifestation, item)
– FRBR Group 2 (person, family, corporate body)
– FRBR Group 3 (concepts, objects, events, places)
FRAD basic relationships
IME-ICC General principles (2009)
General principles:
1. Convenience of the user.
2. Common usage.
3. Representation.
4. Accuracy.
5. Sufficiency and necessity.
6. Significance.
7. Economy.
8. Consistency and standardization
9. Integration.
“The rules in a cataloguing code should be defensible and not arbitrary. It
is recognized that these principles may contradict each other in
specific situations and a defensible, practical solution should be
taken.”
See http://www.ifla.org/files/assets/cataloguing/icp/icp_2009-en.pdf
RDA (2010)
• Scope: support of basic user tasks from FRBR (FISO)
and FRAD (FICJ)
• Principles: guided by IME-ICC:
– Differentiation, sufficiency, relationships,
representation, accuracy, attributions, language
preference, common usage or practice, uniformity
• Core Elements:
– Guided by FRBR/FRAD “high value” elements to support
user tasks, ISBD mandatory elements
Summary
AACR2
Paris
Principles
Stockholm
Seminar
FRBR/FRAD
IME/ICC
ETC.
• RDA is a convergence of a number of cataloguing codes,
principles, and initiatives
Questions

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