Chapter 1: Introduction to Database Processing

Report
Database
Database Processing
Processing
Chapter 1
Introduction to
Database Processing
David M. Kroenke
© 2000 Prentice Hall
Chapter 1
Database Example 1
Mary Richards Housepainting
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Self Employed Entrepreneur
Single User Database
3 Tables (Customers, Jobs, Source)
Data Needs:
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Track how customers, jobs, and referrals relate
Record bid estimates
Track referral sources
Produce mailing labels
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SOURCE
CUSTOMER
JOB
Page 4 Tables of Data for Mary Richards Housepainting, Figure 1-1
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Chapter 1
Database Example 2
Treble Clef Music
– Multi-User database on LAN
– 3 Tables (Customers, Instruments, Rentals)
– Data Needs:
• Track instrument rentals
• Handle multi-user issues
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Customer Form, Figure 1-5a
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Rental Agreement Form, Figure 1-5b
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Instrument Form, Figure 1-5c
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Chapter 1
Database Example 3
State Licensing & Vehicle Registration
– 52 Centers, 37 Offices, Hundreds of Users
– 40 Tables
– Data Needs:
• Track drivers licensing issues
– traffic violations, accidents, arrests, limitations
• Track auto registration issues
– revenue, law enforcement
• Integrate the needs of many departments
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Chapter 1
Database Example 4
Calvert Island Reservations Centre
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Chamber of Commerce
Promotional database provides access to data
Customer and reservation database processes
Data Needs:
• Store multimedia data (photos, video clips, sound clips)
• Must be Web / browser accessible
• Uses Web technologies including HTTP, DHTML, and XML
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Chapter 1
Comparison of Database Examples
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Figure 1-8
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DBMS Relationships
Chapter 1
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Figure 1-9
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Chapter 1
File-Processing Systems
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Figure 1-10
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Chapter 1
Problems with FileProcessing Systems
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Data are separated and isolated
Data are often duplicated
Application program dependent
Incompatible data files
Difficult to understand
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Chapter 1
File-Processing Systems
Create problems with data integrity
because data is:
duplicated duplicated
duplicated duplicated
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Chapter 1
Benefits of DBMS
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Data is integrated
Data duplication is reduced
Data is program independent
Data is easy to understand
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Chapter 1
Database
“a self-describing collection of
integrated records”
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Chapter 1
Data Dictionary
“a description of the structure of the
database; data directory; metadata”
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Chapter 1
Hierarchy of Data Elements
Figure
Page 161-11 (a) File Processing (b) Database Systems
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Chapter 1
Transactions
“representations of events”
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making a sale
receiving a payment
authorizing a new hire
accepting a shipment
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Chapter 1
Early Relational Model
• 1970, E.F. Codd
• Normalization Process
• Compute Intensive
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Chapter 1
Microcomputer DBMS
• Ashton - Tate: dBase II, now Borland
• Oracle, Focus, Ingress ported down
• Paradox, Revelation, MDBS, Helix,
Foxpro, Access built specifically for
microcomputers
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Chapter 1
Current Database Trends
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Client-Server Applications
Integration of Internet Technology
Distributed Processing
Object-Oriented DBMS
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