Hybrid 1 - City of Pasadena

Report
Public Meeting
November 9, 2010
Agenda
 What is the Water Integrated Resources Plan
(WIRP)?
 How was the WIRP developed?
 What are the WIRP major findings?
 What are the WIRP Recommendations?
 How to provide input on the draft report?
 What are your thoughts on what is presented
today?
WIRP Mission Statement
The Pasadena Water Integrated Resources
Plan will provide an achievable, long-term
strategy to meet current and future water
needs. The goals of the WIRP are to
sustainably and cost-effectively address
local and regional water supply and
demand issues, reflect community values,
and adapt to changing conditions.
Why is the WIRP Needed?
 Reliability and costs for imported water are
becoming more uncertain
 Pasadena’s local groundwater is being reduced
 WIRP is the source document for the City’s
2010 Urban Water Management Plan, which is
required by state law to be submitted every
five years
WIRP Stakeholder Input
 A WIRP Advisory
Committee, appointed by
the Mayor, met 7 times
to provide direction,
input and ideas
 Three (including this one)
public meetings
 Outreach via public
polling on internet
Planning Assumptions
 All plans require projections and forecasts to
be made regarding growth, availability of
water, price of water, etc.
 California requires that utilities planning for
water utilize “official” demographic
projections
 Pasadena recognizes these assumptions may
not unfold exactly as planned
PWP’s Service Area
 Pasadena Water &
Power (PWP) serves
the City and several
other communities
 WIRP represents a
strategy to meet the
entire service area
Service Area Demographics
Table A-1
Historical and Projected Demographics for PWP Service Area
Year
Population
Single-Family
Housing Units
1990
146,840
31,469
26,253
115,710
2005
168,997
34,195
27,316
119,072
2010
175,957
36,560
27,713
124,860
2015
180,691
37,578
28,907
128,985
2020
185,640
38,646
30,184
131,588
2025
190,436
39,420
31,236
134,653
2030
195,089
40,151
32,264
137,921
2035
199,562
40,717
33,157
141,047
Annual Change (1990-2010)
0.9%
0.8%
0.3%
0.4%
Annual Change (2010-2035)
0.5%
0.5%
0.8%
0.5%
Source:
1990-2010, US Census and California Department of Finance
2015-2035, Southern California Association of Governments
Multifamily
Housing Units
Employment
Water Demand Forecast
50,000
Actual
Water Demand (Acre-Feet Per Year)
45,000
Projected (average weather, no economic
recession, no additional conservation)
40,000
35,000
very wet &
cool weather
30,000
25,000
20,000
mandatory water
restrictions &
economic
recession
mandatory water
restrictions &
economic
recession
15,000
10,000
5,000
1990
1995
2000
2005
2010
2015
2020
2025
2030
2035
WIRP Evaluation Process
Analyze
Portfolios
Identify Supply Options
(building blocks)
Define Planning
Objectives &
Performance
Measures
Build Portfolios
(Combinations of Options)
Refine
Analysis
(create
hybrids)
Raw Performance
Score Card
Rank
Portfolios
WIRP
Strategy
WIRP Objectives
 Provide a reliable water supply
 Maintain affordability, while addressing fairness and






equity
Protect and enhance source waters and the
environment
Protect cultural and recreational resources
Maximize efficiency of water use
Maintain quality of life and positive economic climate
Reduce risk and maximize opportunity
Reduce energy footprint for water operations
WIRP Options










Recycled water for irrigation & cooling towers
Recycled water for groundwater recharge
Expanded water conservation
Increased surface water diversions
Groundwater storage of imported water
Stormwater capture and groundwater recharge
Graywater
Water transfers (purchases from others)
Ocean desalination (agreement with coastal partner)
Increased reliance on imported water from MWD
Initial Portfolios
Status Quo
Represents the “do nothing” future, and includes only existing
groundwater and surface water diversions (it has the heaviest
emphasis on imported water from MWD).
Minimize MWD Supply
Represents the “do everything” future by maximizing use of all local
options, as well as water transfers and ocean desalination.
Maximize Stewardship
Maximizes “green” solutions such as maximum water conservation,
all stormwater best management practices and graywater, and also
enhances habitat restoration with environmental streamflows.
Low Cost
Consists of all options that have lower or comparable unit costs to
the current price of MWD water.
Maximize Surface Water
Supply and Groundwater
Recharge
Maximizes use of local surface water diversions and enhanced
groundwater recharge.
Non-potable Reuse (NPR)
Maximizes recycled water to meet non-potable demands via a new
non-potable water distribution system.
Combined NPR and Indirect
Potable Reuse (IPR)
Maximizes recycled water for indirect potable reuse (via groundwater
recharge), coupled with a smaller non-potable reuse system.
Hybrid Portfolios
After initial portfolios were analyzed, several
other portfolios were created and evaluated
Hybrid 1
Combines best elements of top performing initial alternatives and
optimizes the size of projects in order to provide maximum benefits
at lower cost
Hybrid 2
Starts by targeting top 10% of single-family residential users and
applies very aggressive pricing in order to reduce demands by 70%,
then implements other conservation programs to multifamily,
commercial and the rest (90%) of single-family users.
Portfolio Rankings
The larger the color bar, the better it Ranking Score
achieves
the
0
0.1 objective
0.2 below
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
8Hybrid
Hybrid 1
5 Maximize SW
Max SW/GW
Supply/GW Recharge
Min MWD
2 Minimize
MWDSupply
Supply
3 Maximize
Stewardship
Max Stewardship
4
LowCost
Cost
Low
9 Top User Conservation
Hybrid 2
6 Non-potable Reuse
NPR
Recycled
(NPR)
7 Combined
and IPR
NPR/IPRNPR
Recycled
1 StatusQuo
Quo
Status
Provide a reliable water supply
Protect & enhance source waters and the environment
Maximize efficiency of water use
Reduce risk & maximize opportunities
Maintain affordability, while addressing fairness and equity
Protect cultural & recreational resources
Maintain quality of life & positive economic climate
Reduce energy footprint for water operations
Sensitivity of Ranking to Different
Weights for Criteria
Hybrid
1
Max
SW/
GW
Min
Max
MWD Steward
Supply
ship
A.C.
Rank
1
2
3
Equal
Rank
1
2
50%
Reliab
1
30%
Afford
50%
Efficen
Low
Cost
Hybrid
2
NPR
NPR &
IPR
Status
Quo
4
5
6
7
8
9
3
5
6
8
4
7
9
2
3
4
6
7
5
8
9
1
2
8
5
4
3
6
7
9
3
5
1
2
6
4
7
8
9
Sensitivity of Ranking to Different
Weights for Criteria
A.C.
Rank
Hybrid
1
Max
SW/
GW
1
2
Min
Max
MWD Steward
Supply
ship
3
4
Low
Cost
Hybrid
2
5
This portfolio ranks
number
1 in5 all but 6
3
one of the scenarios,
making
3 it a preferred
4
6
strategy for PWP
NPR
NPR &
IPR
Status
Quo
6
7
8
9
8
4
7
9
7
5
8
9
Equal
Rank
1
2
50%
Reliab
1
2
30%
Afford
1
2
8
5
4
3
6
7
9
50%
Efficen
3
5
1
2
6
4
7
8
9
Overview of what is in the Preferred
Strategy (Hybrid 1)
 Aggressive water conservation
 Devils Gate diversion to Eaton Canyon
 Groundwater storage of imported water
 Small phase 1 non-potable recycled water,
with tunnel augmentation
 Tertiary-treated recycled water for
groundwater recharge
 Stormwater projects
Aggressive Conservation Program
 Convert about 70% of existing SF homes to comply with California Model
Landscape Ordinance – through PWP rebates and rate structures
 All new SF homes will have drought landscaped front yards, with warm
season lawn (model landscape compliant) back yards – through
ordinances and PWP rebates
 Convert 60-70% of existing MF and Commercial landscapes to comply with
California Model Landscape Ordinance – through PWP rebates and rate
structures
 Double the implementation of PWP’s current indoor conservation for
single-family – through PWP rebates and ordinances
 Continuation of PWP’s current indoor conservation for MF and
Commercial – through PWP rebates
 Individual meters for all new MF accounts – through ordinance
Devil’s Gate to Eaton Canyon
 County conservation project
to reduce discharges to
ocean by storing water
behind Devil’s Gate Dam
(along Arroyo Seco)
 Recharge water behind dam
and provide environmental
releases
 Convey stored water to Eaton
Wash spreading basins to
help with flood management
and additional recharge
 Collect urban runoff/
stormwater flows along pipe
conveyance
Groundwater Storage of Imported Water
 Known as the Pasadena





Groundwater Storage Program
Build groundwater storage bank
through spreading, injection, and
in-lieu use
In-lieu means reduced
groundwater pumping in some
years in order to build storage (use
an in-lieu source to meet
demands)
Treated water spreading and some
injection wells are already in place
Reduced MWD rate for recharge
water
New extraction wells to recover
stored water during shortage
periods
Source of Photo: PGSP Final Conceptual Design Report, October 2007
Recycled Water
 Recycled Purchases from LA-Glendale Water Reclamation Plant (Tertiary Treatment)
 Non-potable Reuse: Phase 1 (Brookside Golf Course & customers adjacent)
 Indirect Potable Reuse: Recharge at Eaton Canyon spreading grounds via LA County
pipeline (Devil’s Gate to Eaton Canyon project)
Phase 1
LA County Pipeline
(Devil’s Gate to Eaton Canyon)
Two proposed alignments shown
Stormwater Projects – Residential
 Residential Cisterns: Collect rainwater from rooftops and
store in 100 gallon cisterns for non-potable use
 Residential Rain Gardens: Downspout from rooftop to
garden bio-retention area (approx. 30 ft2)
 Residential Infiltration strip/bioswale: Bio-retention strip at
edge of lot to capture storm runoff and overwatering from
property, implemented on a neighborhood scale
PWP would provide rebates for ~10,000 homes
(or 25 percent participation) for each type of residential
option
Source of photos:
California Sea Grant Green Sheet #3
Surfrider Foundation Ocean Friendly Gardens
Georgia Stormwater Management Manual
Stormwater Projects – Comm/Ind
 Commercial Parking Lot Swales: Large bio-retention area to collect runoff
from parking lot areas
 Permeable Pavement Parking Lots
PWP would provide rebates for:
 30 percent participation of parking lot swales
 20 percent participation of permeable pavement
Photos provided by Sean Van Delist,
Cement Council of Texas
2035 Average Annual Supply Mix
Benefits of Preferred Strategy
Status Quo
Preferred Strategy
(Hybrid 1)
Annual Shortage Under
Delta Restrictions (AFY)
7,500 (17%)
0
Monthly Shortage Under
MWD Shut Down (AFM)
2,000
200
Annual Groundwater
Recharge (AFY)
3,600
15,500
Reduced Stormwater
Pollution (AFY)
0
1,350
Greenhouse Gases (mt/yr)
42,400
22,100
Compliant with 20 x 2020
NO
YES
Compliant with MWD
Regional Planning (IRP)
NO
YES
Benefits
Average Cost to PWP
854
853
853
852
$/Acre-foot
851
850
849
848
847
847
846
845
844
Status Quo
Preferred Strategy
Potential Climate Change Impacts
 Greater outdoor
water demand
 Reduced imported
water supplies
 Lower
groundwater levels
Source: SIO data for Pasadena vicinity
Benefits of Preferred Strategy in
Mitigating Climate Change Impacts
 Reduces greenhouse gas emissions by
almost 50% by 2035
 Reduces outdoor demands through
conservation, lessening impact of hotter
temperatures
 Develops recycled water, which is not
affected by climate change
 Increases storage in Raymond Basin
Implementation Issues
 Uncertainty in growth projections
 Rate structure re-examination
 New conservation ordinances
 Partnerships with Los Angeles County &
Pasadena Public Works
 Regulatory approval for indirect potable reuse
 Outside funding from MWD, state & others
Adaptive Implementation
 If growth and water supply issues unfold as
assumed, implementation of Hybrid 1 should
occur within next 20 years
 If water demands do not increase as planned,
only elements of Hybrid 1 that cost less than
MWD imported water should be implemented
 Other elements should then be phased in as
needed
Draft WIRP Report Review
 Draft report posted at:
www.pwpweb.com/waterplan
 Sections 1-6 available now
 Section 7 available on Dec 9th
 Public comments via on-line survey will be possible
from Dec 9th – Dec 16th
 WIRP will be presented to City Council in January
2011.
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