Diverse Justifications for Selecting Data Collection and Analysis

Report
PDC14: Diverse pedagogical
practices and conceptual
considerations for developing and
teaching qualitative research
methods courses
Instructors:
Ron Chenail, Nova Southeastern
Mirka Koro-Ljungberg, University of Florida
Jan Nespor, Ohio State University
Purpose of this mini-course
 Purpose of this mini-course is to provide some
suggestions and possible guidance for attendees
regarding how to develop and teach introductory and
advanced qualitative methods courses
 It is important to note that examples presented here
today represent only a fragment of diverse pedagogical
practices and instructional preferences and priorities
Learning objectives
 to increase knowledge about diverse materials suitable for
both introductory and advanced qualitative methods
courses
 to understand diverse challenges such as students’ diverse
backgrounds and interests, diversity of the field,
integration of practice and theory and some solutions to
these challenges when teaching qualitative methods
courses
 to review a set of resources and materials that attendees
can draw from when designing their own courses
 to receive feedback from peers and facilitator regarding
attendee’s own course materials
Today’s activities
Presentation : course sequencing and course content (25 minutes)
Discussion
(10 minutes)
Presentation : assignments and activities (25 minutes)
Discussion
(10 minutes)
Working session: participants will discuss their own course sequencing,
content, assignments, and classroom activities in small groups. Peer
feedback. (20 minutes)
Break (15 minutes)
Presentation: evaluation (25 minutes)
Discussion
(10 minutes)
Presentation: readings and other class materials. (30 minutes)
Discussion
(10 minutes)
Working session (20 minutes)
Concluding discussion led by the organizers to address some general
challenges and promises related to how to create/facilitate/nourish a
community of qualitative scholars that builds on multiple ways of
knowing. Exchange of materials and network building (30 minutes)
Why does teaching QR merit more
attention?
 Many instructors are asked to teach QR without
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‘sufficient’ preparation
Diversity within QR- curriculum issues
Shifts in thinking about science and research –
different vocabularies
Work against assumptions related to the oversimplification of qualitative research and notions of
‘everybody can do QR intuitively’
Researcher as an instrument
Pedagogical consideration
 Mastery – introduction/beginning
 Diversity – singularity of epistemologies,
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methodologies, and methods
‘Step-by-step’ approaches- creative and openended/deconstructive applications
Theory -practice
Service –expertise function
Instructor-institutional characteristics
Resources (i.e. time, assistance, technology)
Mirka Koro-Ljungberg
University of Florida
[email protected]
Special thanks to the following
instructors for sharing their syllabi
in preparation for this presentation
Dr. Kakali Bhattacharya, Texas A & M
Dr. Alecia Jackson, Appalachian State University
Dr. Aaron Kuntz, University of Alabama
Dr. Patti Lather, Ohio State University
Drs. Rachel Holmes, John Schostak, Harry Torrance,
Maggie MacLure, Manchester Metropolitan University
Examples of classroom assignments
and activities
 Participants:
 Focus:
 Evaluation:
An individual
In person
A group
Online
A pair (student pairs, teacherstudent pair)
Creative exercise i.e. data
representation
Theoretical considerations
Introduction to a topic/ exploration
Inquiry/research practice
Critical reading, writing
Instructor graded
Self evaluation
Peer review
Not graded
Graded assignments across some
example institutions
Assignment
type
Assignment
Level
Due
Journal
Reflection journal
Advanced
Mid term
Weekly analytic memos
Advanced
Throughout
Web site postings
Advanced
Throughout
Theory statement
Intro
Varies
Research project report
I+A
End of term
Literature review
I+A
Mid term
Qualitative research podcast
(including picture, voice, video)
Intro
Varies
Journal article draft
Advanced
End of term
Dissertation chapter draft
Advanced
End of term
Report
Draft
Assignment Assignment
type
Level
Due
Performance
Theater or poetic reading
of data
Advanced
End of term
Subjectivity performance
Intro
Beginning of term
Literature discussion
Intro
Mid term
Group discussion
facilitation
Intro
Varies
Portfolio
Writing assignment
portfolio
Advanced
Throughout
Contract
Learning contract
Advanced
Beginning and mid
term
Exams
Mid term and final exams
Intro
Mid and end term
Discussion
Assumptions that guide my choices
of assignments
 Create assignments that can facilitate/nourish a community of
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learners that builds on multiple ways of knowing, co-construction
of knowledge, and that respects diversity (of theoretical
perspectives, epistemologies, subjectivities, methods,
interpretations, genres etc)
Vary assignments so that they highlight qualitative research as
theoretical, methodological, political, and personal
Create space for ‘not-knowing’, re/de-reading, and re/deconceptualizing
Encourage openness and diversity
Encourage to see beyond visible and to “theorize the outliers”
(Fine, 2007)
Educate/mentor researchers
 Consider assignments that deal with ambiguity,
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uncertainty, circularity, lack of closure associated with
many qualitative approaches
No one class is identical to another- variety of activities
Being reactive to students’ needs- adjustment of lesson
plans
Consider activities that prepare students for research
careers (or for other institutional focus if not research)
Be flexible- enable students to tailor assignments to their
needs i.e. by selecting focus, data sources, references,
format, and/or media
Promote activation and provocation
Consider available resources –assignment economy
Activity plan: Intro: Interview II
Activity
Goal
Time *
All
Questions from last class and
today’s readings
Discuss, reflect, and clarify,
critical reading
~10
min
Small group
Creation of semi-structured
interview questions (related
to class project )
Theory into practice
20-30
min
Feedback on created
questions
Peer review and revision
10-15
min
Pair
Practice interviewing (both
sides)
Theory into practice
20-30
min
All
Discussion on occurred
interviews
Reflection and improvement 10-15
suggestions
min
Teacher led
Lecture on transcription
(including examples and
equipment)
Information sharing and
exemplification
10-15
min
Activity plan: Collection: Mapping
Activity
Goal
Time *
One student Presentation about mapping *
or a group of and activities
students
Introduce the topic, share
examples located by
students, practice
~60
min
Small group
Focused discussion and
exploration of one type of
mapping 1) ecomap, 2) city
map, 3) daily timeline
Theoretical discussion,
exploration of main
concepts, critical reading
~20-30
min
Plan and design an activity for
other group regarding a type of
mapping (situated within a RQ
and data collection plan, use
student data)
Gaining deeper
understanding about the
method and its application
20-30
min
Exchange activities and carry
them out
Theory into practice
30-45
min
Discussion about occurred
exercises and today’s readings
and materials
Reflection and improvement
suggestions
10-15
min
All
Activity plan: Analysis:
Phenomenology II
Activity
Goal
Time *
All
Questions from last class and today’s
readings
Discuss, reflect, and clarify,
encourage critical reading
15-20
min
All
Term/process clarifications: write 2
puzzling terms/process aspects,
exchange papers with peers, provide
responses, share with class
Elaboration and clarification 30-45
of main concepts and central min
ideas
Pair
Articulate your understandings of
Theory into practice,
phenomenological analysis process, use individual insights and
examples from data. Write as you go.
applications
30-45
min
Pair
Practice imaginative variation, textural
and structural description at individual
and collective levels (with own data)
Theory into practice
~60
min
All
Discussion about occurred exercises
and today’s materials
Reflection and improvement 10-15
suggestions
min
Research project assignment
 Create a research question and purpose statement. Conduct
in-depth and thorough data analysis of your data. Keep
detailed memos during the analysis process. Write a report
(5-10 pages, double paged, excluding APA references, [cite
appropriately throughout your report]) describing your
analysis process in detail and your main findings. This
analysis report could include:
 brief literature review about your data analysis method
 description of analysis process and illustrative examples of
different stages of the process
 findings and data story (data representation)
 critical discussion about different limitations and strengths of
your analysis and findings
 your reflections on methodological lessons learned and how
this process enabled you to meet your learning goals (or not)
Differences in activities
Intro course
Advanced course
Activity types
More guided activities,
modeling, introductions to
peer review, constructive
criticism , and support groups
More independent activities,
peer reviews and feedback,
activities that require broader
knowledge base and deeper
synthesis
Focus
Shared focus with some
individualization (e.g. shared
research project)
Greater degree of
individualization and
tailoring
Mentoring
In groups
Individually
Professional
goals
Introduction, understanding,
getting involved, respect
Dissemination of knowledge,
career preparation , expertise
Some examples of students’ favorite
activities
 Support and discussion groups
 Reflection journals
 Lectures and guest speakers
 Question- answer sessions
 Data exercises
 Debates
 Performances
 Activities involving peer and instructor feedback
Food for thought
 Avoiding binary thinking e.g. qualitative- quantitative, theory
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practice, insider-outsider
Establishing passionate approach to teaching and research
Practicing critical scholarship
Using various examples (e.g. articles, studies, visuals, artifacts)
from diverse contexts and various fields to practice and reflect
on different aspects of research process
Defining common terms and asking students to use them in
class and in their assignments (dictionaries)
Encouraging students to publish and present their work –
modeling/mentoring
Revising assignments based on students’ feedback
Continuing learning and exploration after the class (support,
reading, writing groups, and other different forms of mentoring)

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