Presentation

Report
Justin Swisher
Tools for Visualizing Information
Professor Eric Mountain
December 2014
General Information
 Project Purpose: To provide students the resources
necessary to research, describe, and create myth
stories.
 Audience: Sixth Grade Basic Skills
 Time Frame: Two weeks (10 class periods)
General Information (continued)
 New Jersey State Standards Addressed:
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6.2.8.D.3.d - Compare the golden ages of Greece, Rome, India, and China, and justify major achievements that represent
world legacies.
6.2.8.D.3.f - Determine the extent to which religions, mythologies, and other belief systems shaped the values of classical
societies.
6.2.8.D.2.a - Analyze the impact of religion on daily life, government, and culture in various ancient river valley
civilizations.
6.2.8.D.4.b - Analyze how religion both unified and divided people.
8.1.8.A.3 - Create a multimedia presentation using sounds and images
 Core Content Standards Addressed:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source;
provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.3 Identify key steps in a text’s description of a process related to history/social studies
(e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered).
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including
vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.5 Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively,
causally).
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.6 Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author’s point of view or purpose (e.g.,
loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts).
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.7 Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps)
with other information in print and digital texts.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.8 Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.9 Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same
topic.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.10 By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the
grades 6–8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Brain Based Concepts
Intelligence
Activities
Linguistic
Sharing thoughts out loud
Explaining / defending opinions
Presenting myths and technology projects
LogicalMathematical
Describing why early Greeks used stories, rather than science, to
understand the world.
Musical
Not applicable.
BodilyKinesthetic
Not applicable.
Spatial
Identifying Ancient Greece on a map
Interpersonal
Explaining why Greeks created myths to try and understand the world
Intrapersonal
Comparing modern tactics to explain the unknown with those of
Ancient Greeks
Brain Based Concepts
Mind Styles
Concrete
Sequential
- Each lesson builds upon the previous one
- Assessment activities are very structured and clear
- Very little down time
Concrete
Random
- Discussion around the morality of Greek Gods' behavior
- Hands-on nature of an online assignment
Abstract
Random
- Delving into theories of how Greeks understood the world
- Stories are independent learning opportunities
Abstract
Sequential
- Discussion around the morality of Greek Gods' behavior
Scaffolding Knowledge
Level
Activities
Remembering
- Define relevant key terms
- Describe characteristics and traits of Greek gods
- Recall settings in a story
- Explain how Greeks used religion to explain natural phenomenons
- Relate the way that Greeks viewed the unknown to the way that people in
modern society view the unknown
- Demonstrate understanding of myths through comprehension activities
- Produce a media presentation displaying a visual aid to go along with a
myth
- Investigate how gods, like humans, were imperfect
- Compare the traits of mortals with those of immortals
- Describe a "tragic hero"
- Discuss why Greek gods interacted with humans the way they did
- Decide whether gods had justified reason to be cruel to humans
- Compose a personal, modern interpretation of a myth
- Create a media presentation displaying visual aid to go along with a myth
Understanding
Applying
Analyzing
Evaluating
Creating
Check Points
Activity 1: What is a Myth / Persephone & Demeter / Quiz
Activity 2: Using Myths to Understand the World /
Beginning of the World / World Chart
Activity 3: Role of the Greek Gods / Gods Chart /
Mythological Glossary / Flow Chart
Activity 4: Pandora’s Box / Comprehension Quiz
Activity 5: Writing a Myth / Pre-Writing Questions / PreWriting Forum / Rough Draft Submission
Works Cited
 Felder, Richard M., and Barbara A. Soloman. Learning Styles and Strategies. Rep.
North Carolina State University, n.d. Web. 11
 Oct. 2013.
 Gardner, H. (1983). Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. New York:
Basic Books.
 Gregorc, A. Ph.D. (1985). Style Delineator. Columbia CT: Gregorc Associates, Inc.
 It's Greek to Me: Greek Mythology. N.p.: Mensa Education & Research Foundation,
2010. PDF.
 Moncrieffe, Karen. Understanding Myths and Legends. Bedfordshire, UK: Brilliant
Publications, 2012. Print.
 Smith, Charles R., and P. Craig. Russell. The Mighty 12: Superheroes of Greek Myth.
New York: Little, Brown, 2008. Print.
 Sousa, D. (2006). How The Brain Learns. 3rd Edition. California: Corwin Press, Inc.
 Worth-Baker, Marcia. Greek Mythology: Activities. New York: Scholastic, 2005. Print.

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