currently - Kansas State Department of Education

Report
CTE Drive-In Workshop
Greenbush
9.22.14
RJ Dake
Don Gifford
Martin Kollman
Kirk Haskins
Kurt Dillon
Housekeeping
This Morning – General Session until 10:15 followed by a Break and
then Breakout sessions (color-coded)
Lunch from 11:45 to 12:45
This Afternoon – Cluster Updates from 12:45 to 2:00 followed by Wrapup and Door Prizes at 2:20
2:30 – Safe Travels Home
Objectives for Today
1. Assess a current Pathway in 4 component areas:
a. Partnerships
b. Physical Environment
c. Professional Development
d. Instructional Practices
2. Begin developing a Pathway Improvement Plan based on results of
the Pathway assessment rubric
3. Obtain answers to your CTE burning questions
Takeaways
CTE Swag
Another resource for highquality CTE Professional
Development
An action plan to engage your
advisory committee and build a
meaningful, strategic 3 year
Pathway Improvement Plan
A better understanding of
CTSO’s and their important
role in preparing students
for College and Career
The most current and up-todate information specific to
your Cluster area
KSDE CTE Team Purpose
Support and empower
schools in developing
quality pathways that
lead students to college
and career readiness
Vision
We will remain a national
leader in CTE.
We will meet the workforce
needs of Kansas.
Kansas CTE leading the way…..
QUANTITY
2298 Pathways in 13-14
2471 Pathway in 14-15
22,763 CTSO students in 12-13
23,653 CTSO students in 13-14
Statewide Articulated
Agreements:
13-14 = 73
14-15 = 91
QUALITY
1. Partnerships
2. Professional Development
3. Instructional Practices
4. Physical Environment
5. Student Outcomes
Success of Senate Bill 155
2011
2012
3,475
3,870
6,101
8,208
28,000 28,161
44,087
60,799
(Public & Private)
548
711
1419
$ Incentives for
Credentials
$0
HS Headcount
College Credit
Hours
# Credentials
# Districts
Participating –
Credential
Incentives only
2013
2014
$ 694,167 $ 1,419,000
108
160
• In 2014, College CTE courses taken
by HS students - a 112% increase in
headcount and 116% increase in
college credit hours over the
baseline year (2012)
• 1,419 secondary students earned
industry-recognized credentials
leading to a high demand
occupation - an increase of 159%
over the 548 credentials earned the
baseline year (2012)
• Major areas for secondary student
certifications: 73% Health; 9%
Construction; 7% Manufacturing;
6% Automotive; 4% Agriculture
Kansas Workforce Needs
1. Higher percentage of post-secondary education
completers
(most of the “new” jobs will require a credential and/or
an Associate’s degree)
2. Higher skilled employees
Here’s what we’re
facing…
Current % of Post-secondary
completers in Kansas
52%
Post-secondary completion = Credential through Advanced degree
Post-Secondary Enrollment %
Kansas Class of 2007
80.6%
% Completing 1 year of college
credit
Kansas Class of 2007
69%
Degree Completion
Kansas Class of 2007
45%
DNF a post-secondary degree
Kansas Class of 2007
55%
Think – Pair - Share
What are some of the reasons over half of our
students who start in post-secondary don’t
complete a degree?
What can we do in secondary education to
cause more students to complete a postsecondary degree?
College and Career Ready in
Kansas
College and Career Ready means an individual
has the academic preparation, cognitive
preparation, technical skills, and employability
skills to be successful in postsecondary
education, in the attainment of an industry
recognized certification or in the workforce,
without the need for remediation.
Closing the Gap
Focus on Career Awareness & Guidance and
CTE Pathways to help more students complete
a post-secondary credential or degree
Review Pathway Standards to ensure they
are relevant, rigorous, and reflective of
current business/industry standards
Statewide Update
Accreditation
Rigor
Relevance
Relationships
Responsive Culture
Results
ESEA Waiver
Approved for 14-15
Assessments
K – 12 CTE Accreditation
Components
•
•
•
•
•
•
Career Awareness & Guidance
Innovation
Instructional Practices*
Integration
Partnerships*
Strategic Planning
•
Support & Recognition
* also component for Pathway “accreditation”
Career Pathways Assessment
System (cPass)
General CTE Assessment
summative college/career ready assessment
measures academic, 21st century skills,
leadership, employability
Comprehensive Agriculture Assessment
measures technical skills in Ag
Career Pathways Assessments
System (cPass)
On the Horizon……..
Animal Systems
Plant Systems
Manufacturing Production
Design and Pre-Construction
Finance
Comprehensive Business
Marketing
Kansas Center for
Career
and Technical
Education
Greg Belcher, Director
Objective One of KCCTE
Summer
1st
All Cohort Groups would follow this schedule:
Fall
Spring
TTED 193 New Instructor
Workshop (one week)
TTED 445/845 Curriculum Development
TTED 391/893 Student
Assessment Development
TTED 479/779 Techniques for
Teaching Technical Education
TTED 308/708 Tool and Lab Safety
TTED 695 Using Technology as
an Instructional Tool
TTED 731 Adult Learners
TTED 608/808 Work-based Learning
TTED 698 School Improvement
Processes
TTED 697/897 Teaching Special
Needs Students
TTED 694/894 History and Philosophy of
CTE
Year
2nd
Year
3rd
Year
TTED 780 Classroom and
Laboratory Management in
CTE
TTED 483/873 Teaching
Internship
Objective Two of KCCTE
• On site mentorship of new CTE teachers
• Is to provide assistance to the new CTE teachers where they
need help most
• Is not an evaluation of the new CTE teacher
Objective Three of KCCTE
• Content specific workshops
• Example: Teacher who teaches within a Construction pathway
and wants to add a course on Plumbing Technology
• Updates with industry current technology
• Plan to have curriculum that could be used by the CTE teacher
• Only cost associated with these workshop will be travel and
lodging
Objective Four of KCCTE
• Web-based presence where CTE teachers can download
resource materials
• Will also allow CTE teachers to share best practices with other
CTE teachers
• Will develop databases of the different CTE teachers so
information regarding workshops and/or Center services can
be shared appropriately
Career & Technical
Student Organizations
Kansas State Department of Education
What is a CTSO?
Purpose of a CTSO?
Be an integral part of Classroom Instruction





To help students develop understanding of industry and
technology while learning teamwork and leadership skills
To support and enhance related school-based and work-based
learning
To contribute to the preparation of a world-class workforce
To prepare members for the challenges of a dynamic world
To develop relationships
CTSO Core Values
 Commitment  Professionalism
 Conviction
 Recognition
 Education
 Service
 Integrity
 Teamwork
 Leadership
CTSO Foundation Knowledge & Skills
CTSOs are Intra-Curricular
All Kansas Career and Technical
Student Organizations are IntraCurricular; all activities are linked to
what is learned in the classroom.
How Do CTSO’s Keep Students in
School?




Students are able to apply classroom knowledge to a
real world hands-on setting
Students have the opportunity for a leadership role
Students discover a wide range of career options
Prepare students to be college and career ready
Making an Impact

Students who participate in a CTSO demonstrate higher
levels of:
Academic engagement and motivation
 Civic engagement
 Career self-efficacy
 Employability skills
 Educational aspirations
 Grade point averages
They are more likely to be enrolled in college at 21 than others

All CTSO’s









Develop People & Teamwork Skills
Develop Leadership and Professional Development
Provide Citizenship and Communication Skills
Develop Responsibility
Provide Career-Related Training
Develop Sense of Community and Volunteerism
Promote Career Awareness
Link Academic Work to Technical Work
Develop Problem Solving & Critical Thinking Skills
Benefits for Students






CTSO experiences bring relevance to their
classroom
Global Awareness
Opportunity for travel & recognition
Develop 21st Century Skills
Networking
Scholarship opportunities
Benefits for Advisors
Engaged and Motivated
 Hands-on learning component
 Encourages parental involvement
 Professional Development
 Professional Networking

Benefits for Schools





Increase student interest in learning
Promotes positive community & school relationships
Publicizes the value of CTE & Academics to students
Enriches classroom & learning activities
Recognition
Benefits for Communities



Prepares students for community responsibilities
Increased attitudes towards youth & education
Lends support for community projects &
activities
Benefits for Business & Industry
 Expands
the workforce
 Trained & capable & reliable workers
 Internships
 Networking
Competitive Events
Directly contribute to every student being college & career ready when they graduate from high school.
Opportunities
BPA
DECA
FBLA
FCCLA
FFA
HOSA
SkillsUSA
TSA
Kansas Membership 2013-2014
24,000
Where might you fit?
BPA - Business Education pathways
DECA – Marketing pathways
FBLA – Business Education pathways
FCCLA – Family & Consumer Science pathways
FFA – Agricultural pathways
HOSA – Health Sciences pathways
SkillsUSA – Trade, Industrial & Technical pathways
TSA - Technology pathways
Indicators
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Is the instruction balanced between classroom & Lab instruction,
experiential learning and leadership & personal development?
Are authentic student experiences integrated into instructional
methods?
Is experiential learning and leadership development and personal
growth integrated into the instructional program?
Instruction is centered on industry standards, academic and technical
skill attainment with demonstration of strong employability skills.
Instruction methods and resources meet the learning styles and needs
of all students.
Contact your CTSO!
BPA: Emily Sanders-Jones, 785-296-1074

www.bpa.org

[email protected]
DECA: Emily Sanders-Jones, 785-296-1074
■
www.deca.org
■
[email protected]
FBLA: Connie Lindell, 785-760-1038
■
www.fbla-pbl.org
■
[email protected]
FCCLA: Pam Lamb, 785-296-2164
■
www.fcclainc.org
■
[email protected]
FFA: Mary Kane, 785-532-6424
■
www.ffa.org
■
[email protected]
HOSA: Wendy Pickell, 785-296-3860
■
www.hosa.org
■
[email protected]
SkillsUSA: Becky Warren, 620-820-9367
■
www.skillsusa.org
■
[email protected]
TSA: Carolyn Cole, 620-340-3766
■
www.tsaweb.org
■
[email protected]
Break Time
Creating A Quality Pathway Improvement Plan
Breakout Sessions will convene after the Break
Sessions begin again at 12:45 p.m.
Objectives for Today
1. Assess a current Pathway in 4 component areas:
a. Partnerships
b. Physical Environment
c. Professional Development
d. Instructional Practices
2. Begin developing a Pathway Improvement Plan based on results of
the Pathway assessment rubric
3. Obtain answers to your CTE burning questions
Takeaways
CTE Swag
Another resource for highquality CTE Professional
Development
An action plan to engage your
advisory committee and build a
meaningful, strategic 3 year
Pathway Improvement Plan
A better understanding of
CTSO’s and their important
role in preparing students
for College and Career
The most current and up-todate information specific to
your Cluster area
DOOR PRIZES

similar documents